Old Faithful and the Surrounding Geothermal Activity at Yellowstone National Park

I still remember the first time I visited Yellowstone National Park. It was the summer after my freshman year of college, and a big group of my friends had orchestrated a giant road trip to Wyoming. I was taken away by the beauty of the park with its endless forests, rolling mountains, pristine lakes, and rocky canyons. The other detail that caught my eye was the fact that the entire park looked like it might explode at any minute. Geothermal activity was everywhere!! The most famous of course is Old Faithful.

people waiting by Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park
people waiting by Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park

Old Faithful

Yellowstone is organized around several different villages. Old Faithful is one such village. There is a huge visitor center with places to eat and memorabilia to empty your wallet. Right outside is a benches in front of Old Faithful where people wait for the famous geyser to makes its hourly appearance.

I remember my first visit. My friends and I waited with anticipation along with the rest of crowd. Finally, Old Faithful begin steaming. Then boiling hot water towered into the sky. After a couple of minutes, it was over. Don't get me wrong, it was cool. However, it is definitely not the coolest thing in Yellowstone. In fact, by wandering down the boardwalk just a few feet beyond Old Faithful, all sorts of wondrous, weird sights await you.

Hot Springs

Hot springs are the most common hydrothermal features in Yellowstone. They occur when superheated water cools as it reaches the surface. The water then sinks and is replaced again with hot water. Because the water is circulating, it does not reach a high enough temperature to erupt like a geyser.

Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park
Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park
Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park
Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park

Geysers

Geysers are basically hot springs that have some type of restriction in their plumbing. This prevents the water from circulating freely like a hot spring. Some of the deep water reaches temperatures exceeding the boiling point. Pressure increases deeper down. Increased pressure keeps the water from boiling, and as it rises, it turns to steam. The steam expands as it rises, and eventually the bubbles reach a point where they cause the water to overflow. As the pressure decreases, violent boiling begins. All of this steam forces the water to erupt out of the geyser.

Mudpots

Mudpots are thermal activity that has a limited water supply. They are caused in part by microorganisms that use hydrogen sulfide from deep inside the earth as an energy source. These microorganisms then convert gas into sulfuric acid. This acid breaks down rock and turns it to clay. As gasses escape the this clay, it bubbles.

Mudpots, Yellowstone National Park
Mudpots, Yellowstone National Park

Fumaroles

Fumaroles are basically steam vents. They do not have a lot of water so it all turns to steam before it reaches the surface. These features represent the hottest hydrothermal activity at Yellowstone

You could easily spend weeks in Yellowstone and not see all the park has to offer. The walk around the boardwalk at Old Faithful is a great way to see a wide variety of thermal activity in a short time. This would probably be particularly attractive to those with little ones.

This area of the park is definitely crowded, but it's worth seeing. Afterwards you can hike off into the backcountry for some peace and quiet or get a room at the rustic Old Faithful Inn. Make sure to book it far in advance! The inn is a national historic landmark and it is often booked up to a year in advance.

I have visited Yellowstone three times and each time I have marveled at the strange sights the park has to offer. Our world is cool and interesting! Get out there and enjoy it!!

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Comments 11 comments

cactusbythesea profile image

cactusbythesea 4 years ago from Seattle

Great hub! It's been a long time since I've been to Yellowstone, so I appreciate the reminder of how beautiful and unique it is. Thanks for posting this!


brenda12lynette profile image

brenda12lynette 4 years ago from Utah Author

Thanks for stopping by cactusbythesea! I'm glad I could bring back some old memories :)


mecheshier profile image

mecheshier 4 years ago

Fabulous Hub. Wonderful pics and info. Thank you for sharing. Voted up for interesting and awesome.


brenda12lynette profile image

brenda12lynette 4 years ago from Utah Author

Thanks mecheshier! My husband takes all the pictures for me. It's fun reliving the hikes by writing the hubs.


mecheshier profile image

mecheshier 4 years ago

Beautiful area. I love Yellowstone and Jackson Hole.


Outbound Dan profile image

Outbound Dan 4 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

Awesome Hub with great descriptions of the geothermal features you can find in the park. Someday soon I'll be visiting Yellowstone. I already have my topo maps and guidebooks.


brenda12lynette profile image

brenda12lynette 4 years ago from Utah Author

Enjoy Dan! There is so much to see!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

How come I'm not getting notifications when you write? I just realized it this morning when I saw your comment on my site....I thought....hmmm, I haven't seen a hub by Brenda in quite some time. I really am sorry; I simply did not know you had been writing anything new.

This is my favorite place on Earth. I go there every summer and I worked there for a few months. This is where I want my ashes spread....so I loved your hub...it was great!


brenda12lynette profile image

brenda12lynette 4 years ago from Utah Author

Don't worry about it. Last week I didn't get around to any writing, but I'm trying to do better this week.

I also worked in Yellowstone for a summer cleaning cabins! It was so much fun... being in Yellowstone, not the toilet part.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Another great read from you and voted up plus shared.

Eddy.


brenda12lynette profile image

brenda12lynette 3 years ago from Utah Author

Thanks again!! I recently moved to NE Utah so I live pretty close. I need to visit again. I love Yellowstone :)

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