Paris; A Photographic Tour of the Main Sites along the Seine

The Cathedral of Notra-Dame
The Cathedral of Notra-Dame

NOTRE DAME, THE LOUVRE, ARC DE TRIOMPHE, LES INVALIDES, THE EIFFEL TOWER AND OTHER SITES ALONG THE RIVER SEINE

This is a photographic record in 3 pages of a 3 day vacation in Paris, focusing on the main tourist sites, and the challenges and possibilities for photographers. This is Page 1.

INTRODUCTION

In September 2011 I spent three days in the city of Paris, capital of France and regarded by many as the most romantic city on Earth. It was, as I say, only three days, so for me it became something of a whistle-stop tour, cramming as much as possible into the time available, with my eye pressed too often to the viewfinder of my camera, when perhaps I should have been taking in the whole city panorama, and cementing memories of Paris in my mind. (But then, taking photographs is my hobby, so that's what I do).

These pages are not an in-depth guide to the city (not possible after such a brief personal experience). They are a record of the major buildings of this great city; the attractions which are on everyone's must-see list for a first-time visit. And the pages include accompanying notes on a few of the challenges involved in photographing these sites as seen from the point of view of an amateur with limited technical skills, but hopefully some compositional ability. The aim is to encourage everyone to try a fresh approach to their photography when on vacation, and to make the most of their holiday time in creating a lasting memory of the experience.

This page looks at sites to be seen within one kilometre of the great River Seine.

  • All photos on this page were taken by the author between 5th and 7th Sept 2011

CONTENTS

Page 1: Sites to be seen in the centre of Paris, within one kilometre of the River Seine - Notre Dame, the Louvre, Place de la Concorde, the Grand Palais and Petit Palais, the Arc De Triomphe, Les Invalides, the Eiffel Tower, Palais du Luxembourg and others

Page 2: Sites to be seen beyond the banks of the river - the Palace of Versailles and Sacre-Coure. Also aerial views of Paris and additional notes

Page 3: The artistry and architecture of Paris - Decorative ornamentations, wall paintings, stained glass and statues, modern artists at work, and glittering lights

Under the bridges of Paris
Under the bridges of Paris
One of the many boats which ferry tourists along the most scenic stretch of the water. The boats offer a relaxed platform from which to photograph the buildings of Paris, and a trip along the river is well worth taking
One of the many boats which ferry tourists along the most scenic stretch of the water. The boats offer a relaxed platform from which to photograph the buildings of Paris, and a trip along the river is well worth taking
Padlocks and symbols of everlasting love on Le Pont des Arts, as described in the text. This is a pleasing tradition; there isn't room for many more padlocks, but hopefully a way will be found to allow the practice to continue
Padlocks and symbols of everlasting love on Le Pont des Arts, as described in the text. This is a pleasing tradition; there isn't room for many more padlocks, but hopefully a way will be found to allow the practice to continue
A view of Pont Neuf's ornamental detail from close up. The tourist boats allow buildings and bridges to be photographed from an angle not possible on dry land, and they make for a peaceful break from traipsing the streets
A view of Pont Neuf's ornamental detail from close up. The tourist boats allow buildings and bridges to be photographed from an angle not possible on dry land, and they make for a peaceful break from traipsing the streets

THE SEINE AND ILE DE CITE

The Seine is the historic lifeblood of the city of Paris, and the majority of Paris's most famous landmarks are to be found within a very short distance of its banks. If we are going to tour the major sites of Paris which lie along the Seine, then a good starting point is Ile de la Cité, one of two islands sat in the middle of the river, right in the very heart of Paris. But this is not merely where our tour begins, it is where Paris itself began. In 52 BC, Julius Caesar seized control of a small village called Lutetia which was built on this island in the Seine, and here he established a garrison. Gradually the settlement was built upon and became the centre of a much wider community and ultimately the seat of French kings for many hundreds of years. Although the power has now moved away from the Ile de la Cité, the site remains very much the centre of Paris, and home to the Palais de Justice (former home of the French kings), Sainte-Chapelle (Louis IX's chapel) and above all, the Cathedral of Notre Dame.

The bridges over the Seine could really be a photographic subject in their own right. Most famous is Pont-Neuf - one of several bridges which connect the Ile de la Cité and its sister island Ile St-Louis to the river-banks. Le Pont des Arts, depicted opposite, is a little further west. This bridge is the site of a new romantic 'tradition' in the City of Romance where lovers lock padlocks adorned with their names and ribbons to the bridge and throw away the keys into the Seine.

And speaking of which, a slow night-time cruise along the Seine has long been regarded as one of the most romantically sentimental things to do in the city (I didn't do that - no time in my 3 days, and no one to be romantic with). But if you can't do the night-time cruise, then a daytime cruise is a must, to enable you to get a rather different perspective on the Parisian architecture, and to get a little breather away from the traffic and the crowds on the streets.

Although much of Paris lies to the east of the Ile de la Cité, the majority of the most celebrated sites and monuments are to the west - down river - and many of these can easily be seen from the river. So on this page these will be described in sequence as we sail (or walk) down river from the islands.

Pont-Neuf, or 'New Bridge' is the oldest (despite its name) and probably the most famous of 37 bridges over the Seine. It was completed in 1607, and connects the Ile de la Cite with both the left and the right banks of Paris
Pont-Neuf, or 'New Bridge' is the oldest (despite its name) and probably the most famous of 37 bridges over the Seine. It was completed in 1607, and connects the Ile de la Cite with both the left and the right banks of Paris
The Cathedral of Notre Dame
The Cathedral of Notre Dame
Click thumbnail to view full-size
A boat in the foreground helps to add interest and break up an expanse of monocoloured water - it's worth waiting for the boat!Notre Dame rises above the trees. Trees are useful framing devices, though here I think they obscure a little too much of the cathedralSometimes it can create quite a good effect to stand close and point the camera upwards; a tower really does seem to 'tower' over youThe East Face of Notre-Dame showing the arched flying buttress supports on the exterior, designed to strengthen the wallsClearly, very pale stonework such as this, benefits from a background sky which is blue, or grey, or cloudy, but not all white
A boat in the foreground helps to add interest and break up an expanse of monocoloured water - it's worth waiting for the boat!
A boat in the foreground helps to add interest and break up an expanse of monocoloured water - it's worth waiting for the boat!
Notre Dame rises above the trees. Trees are useful framing devices, though here I think they obscure a little too much of the cathedral
Notre Dame rises above the trees. Trees are useful framing devices, though here I think they obscure a little too much of the cathedral
Sometimes it can create quite a good effect to stand close and point the camera upwards; a tower really does seem to 'tower' over you
Sometimes it can create quite a good effect to stand close and point the camera upwards; a tower really does seem to 'tower' over you
The East Face of Notre-Dame showing the arched flying buttress supports on the exterior, designed to strengthen the walls
The East Face of Notre-Dame showing the arched flying buttress supports on the exterior, designed to strengthen the walls
Clearly, very pale stonework such as this, benefits from a background sky which is blue, or grey, or cloudy, but not all white
Clearly, very pale stonework such as this, benefits from a background sky which is blue, or grey, or cloudy, but not all white

THE CATHEDRAL OF NOTRE DAME

The great Gothic Cathedral of Notre Dame dominates the Ile de la Cité. It was built between 1160 and 1345 AD, though with some additions including the steeple, in the 19th century. The most famous and photogenic aspect of the building must be the imposing west face which features two great towers standing 69m (226 ft) high. The famous bell of Notre Dame is housed in the south (right) tower. Other significant features of the west face include one of the cathedral's many rose windows, a frieze of 28 statues of Biblical figures called the Gallery of Kings, and the three great arched doorways or portals.

During the French revolution Notre-Dame suffered along with the rest of Paris, and many of the sculptures, as well as the interior furnishings were damaged or removed. The Gallery of Kings in particular was vandalised - revolutionaries thought the figures were not Biblical, but the hated aristocracy of France. Extensive restoration however took place in the 19th century to return the cathedral to its former glory.

For the whole building, Notre Dame is best photographed from the river, or from the left (south) bank. On the island, one is a little too close to fully embrace the entire building. Several more photos of the cathedral - and specifically details of the West Face, and images of the stained glass windows of Notre Dame - will be shown on Page 3 of this tour.

The Louvre - perhaps the most famous museum in the world
The Louvre - perhaps the most famous museum in the world
The Pavillon Richelieu at the Louvre
The Pavillon Richelieu at the Louvre
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Ancient and modern. Juxtaposition of architecture at the Louvre. The building in the background is the Pavillon Richelieu, part of the north wing of the museumNote how a slight change in the angle and intensity of light can change the colour of stonework and the reflectivity of glass compared to the previous image Pavillon de l'Horoge. If you like your photos relatively free of passers-by (some of whom inevitably seem to wear distracting bright red clothing) images like this take perseverance!The Pavillon de l'Horoge (Clock Pavillion) built in the mid 17th century, is probably the Louvre's most famous wing, also now commonly known as the Pavillon SullyThe east facing wing and original main entrance to the Louvre which fronts on to the Place du Louvre and the road named after the museum - the Rue du Louvre
Ancient and modern. Juxtaposition of architecture at the Louvre. The building in the background is the Pavillon Richelieu, part of the north wing of the museum
Ancient and modern. Juxtaposition of architecture at the Louvre. The building in the background is the Pavillon Richelieu, part of the north wing of the museum
Note how a slight change in the angle and intensity of light can change the colour of stonework and the reflectivity of glass compared to the previous image
Note how a slight change in the angle and intensity of light can change the colour of stonework and the reflectivity of glass compared to the previous image
Pavillon de l'Horoge. If you like your photos relatively free of passers-by (some of whom inevitably seem to wear distracting bright red clothing) images like this take perseverance!
Pavillon de l'Horoge. If you like your photos relatively free of passers-by (some of whom inevitably seem to wear distracting bright red clothing) images like this take perseverance!
The Pavillon de l'Horoge (Clock Pavillion) built in the mid 17th century, is probably the Louvre's most famous wing, also now commonly known as the Pavillon Sully
The Pavillon de l'Horoge (Clock Pavillion) built in the mid 17th century, is probably the Louvre's most famous wing, also now commonly known as the Pavillon Sully
The east facing wing and original main entrance to the Louvre which fronts on to the Place du Louvre and the road named after the museum - the Rue du Louvre
The east facing wing and original main entrance to the Louvre which fronts on to the Place du Louvre and the road named after the museum - the Rue du Louvre

THE LOUVRE

Not far down river from Notre-Dame is the most extensive of all buildings in central Paris. This is the Louvre, for many centuries the home of the French court, but now the site of perhaps the most famous art gallery in the world, the Musée du Louvre. Originally built as a fortress in 1200, the building became home to French king Charles V In the mid 16th century, and the Louvre took on the design of a true king’s palace as the fortress was demolished. Louis XIV eventually moved court to Versailles, but the Louvre then took on a new life as a museum. This first opened in 1793, and the collection of works rapidly expanded over the next decade with the acquisitions of Napoleon Bonaparte during his battles throughout Europe. Works on display number more than 35,000 including paintings, sculptures, antique objects, furnishings and tapestries. Most famously the museum houses the ancient sculpture of the Venus de Milo, and of course, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

Amidst much publicity and not a little controversy, the latest architectural addition to the Louvre was the Pyramid constructed in 1989 in the Cour Napoléon (Napoleon's court). Some find the Pyramid a beautiful modern design, some regard it's angular metal frame and plain glass panels rather jarring, when set against the traditional architecture of the Louvre. Personally, I like the Pyramid, but perhaps not so much in this setting.

The Louvre - medieval architecture, modern design, and the natural appeal of water. To do the Louvre justice, a full day at least is required, and not the couple of hours or so available to me to take these pictures.
The Louvre - medieval architecture, modern design, and the natural appeal of water. To do the Louvre justice, a full day at least is required, and not the couple of hours or so available to me to take these pictures.
Perhaps the best time to see the Place de la Concorde, is at night, when the obelisk is most attractively lit, and passing traffic is minimal
Perhaps the best time to see the Place de la Concorde, is at night, when the obelisk is most attractively lit, and passing traffic is minimal

PLACE DE LA CONCORDE

A few hundred metres west from the Louvre is Place de la Concorde - a site of great notoriety. it was here that so many executions took place during the time of the French revolution. It is estimated 1300 people died under the guillotine at Place de la Concorde including King Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette, as well as Robespierre.

The site is marked today by a 3200 year old obelisk from the Temple of Luxor, a gift from the Viceroy of Egypt in 1829. It is not really the easiest of monuments to photograph, surrounded as it is by a sea of traffic during the daytime. Nor are the surroundings particularly attractive - a vast expanse of concrete and a massive roundabout, albeit adorned with fountains and statues. But at night the obelisk is lit up, and this perhaps is the time to see it at its best.

'Immortality outstripping Time' One of two copper sculptures by Georges Récipon which sit atop the northeast and southeast corners of the Grand Palais
'Immortality outstripping Time' One of two copper sculptures by Georges Récipon which sit atop the northeast and southeast corners of the Grand Palais
The bird-cage like roof of the Grande Palace
The bird-cage like roof of the Grande Palace

THE CHAMPS ELYSEES, THE GRAND PALAIS AND THE PETIT PALAIS

Place de la Concorde marks the start of the road touted by the French as the most beautiful avenue in the world. The Champs Elysées stretches from the Obelisk in a northwesterly direction taking us away from the Seine and towards the Arc de Triomphe. But if we briefly detour south to the Seine we find a couple of buildings known as the the Grand PalaIs and the Petit Palais.

The Grand Palais is an attractive domed building which was built to house a major exhibition in 1900, and still serves as an exhibition centre today, as does the Petit Palais, which faces it from the other side of Avenue Churchill. Both buildings are well worth a look, because they are among the most attractive buildings in Paris.

The world's most celebrated triumphal arch - appropriately called the Arc de Triomphe
The world's most celebrated triumphal arch - appropriately called the Arc de Triomphe
The Arc De Triomphe houses Frances's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
The Arc De Triomphe houses Frances's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
A difficult building to photograph, with trees, motor cars and people obscuring the view
A difficult building to photograph, with trees, motor cars and people obscuring the view

THE ARC DE TRIOMPHE

The most famous building of its kind in the world was initially conceived by Napoleon as a tribute to himself and to the armies of his empire. Work began on the arch in 1806, but it was not completed until 1836, due to various interruptions, not least the death of Napoleon himself. Since then the Arc has been the focal point of many ceremonies including the annual Bastille Parade. Underneath the Arc lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

The Arc is most associated with, and should be approached via, the Champs Elysées. In fact of course, the Arc stands on a roundabout which is the confluence of not just the Champs Elysées, but roads converging form eight different directions, and all bear nice leafy trees near the junction with the roundabout. Attractive, yes, but that poses major problems for photography of the Arc, as it’s virtually impossible to get an angle which takes in the whole of the building without the view being obscured by the trees. The solution may be to get close with a wide angle lens, or else to stand in the middle of one of those busy roads away from the tree-lined edges (photography can be a hazardous hobby).

This gilded statue on a 17m (56 ft) high granite plinth, is one of four which guards the entrances to the Pont Alexander III Bridge. The bridge spans the River Seine between the Grand Palais on the north (left) bank, and Les Invalides to the south
This gilded statue on a 17m (56 ft) high granite plinth, is one of four which guards the entrances to the Pont Alexander III Bridge. The bridge spans the River Seine between the Grand Palais on the north (left) bank, and Les Invalides to the south
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tombThe Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tombThe Church of St Louis at Les Invalides is a beautiful sight after sunset when the dome is brightly illuminated. The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tombThe Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of St Louis at Les Invalides is a beautiful sight after sunset when the dome is brightly illuminated.
The Church of St Louis at Les Invalides is a beautiful sight after sunset when the dome is brightly illuminated.
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb
The Church of Les Invalides, just one of many treasures of the fanmous old building, and home to Napoleon's tomb

LES INVALIDES

Returning from the Arc de Triomphe and crossing the Pont Alexander III Bridge to the south side (left bank) of the Seine for the first time, we come to the pleasant green Esplanade des Invalides which leads to the Hôtel des Invalides. This impressive, extensive building was first built under Louis XIV in the 1670s as a sanctuary for old and injured soldiers - quite an altruistic idea for the times. Today, the building is home to two museums including the national war museum, as well as two churches, and the most distinctive feature of the architecture is the golden domed roof of one of these, known as the 'Église du Dôme des Invalides' dedicated to Saint Louis and designed in 1680. Beneath the dome lies the tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Les Invalides will hold interest for many visitors because of the varied functions and exhibits to be found here, and for the photographer, a brief visit after sunset is recommended, as the domed church is one of Paris's best illuminated buildings at night.

The Eiffel Tower by night
The Eiffel Tower by night
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Eiffel Tower photographed from the green lawns known as the Parc du Champs de Mars which stretch out in front of the edificeThe weather wasn't kind for photography of the Tower when this photo was taken. A uniform white sky is not ideal as a backdropThe Eiffel Tower. Again - problems with the drab background. Also, I undoubtably should have had a wide angle lens for this visit! (See the text)The Eiffel Tower rising above the treetops - a good illustration of the immense height of the building; once the world's tallestThe Tower from across the river. The boat adds interest, but perhaps the composition is not so pleasing as in the earlier picture of Notre Dame
The Eiffel Tower photographed from the green lawns known as the Parc du Champs de Mars which stretch out in front of the edifice
The Eiffel Tower photographed from the green lawns known as the Parc du Champs de Mars which stretch out in front of the edifice
The weather wasn't kind for photography of the Tower when this photo was taken. A uniform white sky is not ideal as a backdrop
The weather wasn't kind for photography of the Tower when this photo was taken. A uniform white sky is not ideal as a backdrop
The Eiffel Tower. Again - problems with the drab background. Also, I undoubtably should have had a wide angle lens for this visit! (See the text)
The Eiffel Tower. Again - problems with the drab background. Also, I undoubtably should have had a wide angle lens for this visit! (See the text)
The Eiffel Tower rising above the treetops - a good illustration of the immense height of the building; once the world's tallest
The Eiffel Tower rising above the treetops - a good illustration of the immense height of the building; once the world's tallest
The Tower from across the river. The boat adds interest, but perhaps the composition is not so pleasing as in the earlier picture of Notre Dame
The Tower from across the river. The boat adds interest, but perhaps the composition is not so pleasing as in the earlier picture of Notre Dame
The Eiffel Tower photographed from the Montparnasse Tower to the south - you can ascend Eiffel's Tower itself to take photos, but 'Tour Montparnasse' is a better alternative for shooting bird's eye pictures (see also Page 2)
The Eiffel Tower photographed from the Montparnasse Tower to the south - you can ascend Eiffel's Tower itself to take photos, but 'Tour Montparnasse' is a better alternative for shooting bird's eye pictures (see also Page 2)

THE EIFFEL TOWER

And so now to the most famous pile of wrought iron in the world. A dismissive comment - but only in jest, because in my opinion the Eiffel Tower is possibly the most beautiful building in the world. I appreciate it’s a point of view which is strongly contested by some. Many will dislike the angular struts and beams of metal, and regard it as little more than a glorified electricity pylon, a metal monstrosity bound together with more than two million rivets. Indeed in 1889 when first erected, some described it as 'useless' and 'monstrous'. But for many others, myself included, all aspects of the Eiffel Tower just work perfectly - the shape, the structure, the size and even the rust-brown colour perfectly compliment each other.

The tower was completed in 1889 for the Exposition Universalle. It was the tallest building in the world at 300m (984 ft), and was to remain so for the next 40 years before being superseded by first the Chrysler Building and then the Empire State Building in New York.

But love it or hate it in the daytime, I would suggest that a visit to Eiffel’s Tower at night-time is an absolute must. The whole structure is lit from top to bottom by 20,000 light bulbs, and on the hour every hour, a sprinkling of white lights flicker on and off over five minutes. I defy anyone not to find that show the most beautiful of man-created architectural sights.

Any pretence I might have to claim to be a photographer was lost here! Being a short trip, I chose to travel light, and that meant leaving some camera gear behind; it is a cardinal sin to try to take dramatic dynamic photos of a building like the Eiffel Tower without the aid of a wide angle lens, but that is what I had to do. Getting in close and shooting upwards at the tower creates great images. The tower becomes - literally - towering. Practise what I say, not what I did - take a wide angle lens if you want good images of the Eiffel Tower.

THe Eiffel Tower lights up the night sky. Several more photos showing the Eiffel Tower in all of its night time spleandour will appear of Page 3 of this series
THe Eiffel Tower lights up the night sky. Several more photos showing the Eiffel Tower in all of its night time spleandour will appear of Page 3 of this series

ONE MORE PHOTO FROM THE RIGHT BANK

Back on the right bank between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde is this small version of the Arc de Triomphe known as the Arc du Carrousel, built like its famous bigger brother by Napoleon to commemorate his victories
Back on the right bank between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde is this small version of the Arc de Triomphe known as the Arc du Carrousel, built like its famous bigger brother by Napoleon to commemorate his victories

AND SOME MISCELLANEOUS PHOTOS OF LEFT BANK & ILE DE LA CITE BUILDINGS

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Musee d'Orsay, the second great museum of the arts in the centre of Paris, which houses works of art from the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century The Richelieu Chapel at The Sorbonne - France's most celebrated University - is a 17th century construction which houses the tomb of the famous French cardinal The Pantheon - a difficult building to photograph at ground level without buildings on either side (just out of frame here) or cars and people encroaching on to the image The Pantheon, showing detail of the upper levels. The near proximity of neighbouring buildings makes a close-up like this rather easier than taking a photo of the whole edifice A confession and a lesson - I cannot remember which building this dome adorns. Always take notes when you take photos; a picture is so much more worthwhile if we can put a name to it * See identifying note at the bottom of the page*
The Musee d'Orsay, the second great museum of the arts in the centre of Paris, which houses works of art from the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century
The Musee d'Orsay, the second great museum of the arts in the centre of Paris, which houses works of art from the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century
The Richelieu Chapel at The Sorbonne - France's most celebrated University - is a 17th century construction which houses the tomb of the famous French cardinal
The Richelieu Chapel at The Sorbonne - France's most celebrated University - is a 17th century construction which houses the tomb of the famous French cardinal
The Pantheon - a difficult building to photograph at ground level without buildings on either side (just out of frame here) or cars and people encroaching on to the image
The Pantheon - a difficult building to photograph at ground level without buildings on either side (just out of frame here) or cars and people encroaching on to the image
The Pantheon, showing detail of the upper levels. The near proximity of neighbouring buildings makes a close-up like this rather easier than taking a photo of the whole edifice
The Pantheon, showing detail of the upper levels. The near proximity of neighbouring buildings makes a close-up like this rather easier than taking a photo of the whole edifice
A confession and a lesson - I cannot remember which building this dome adorns. Always take notes when you take photos; a picture is so much more worthwhile if we can put a name to it * See identifying note at the bottom of the page*
A confession and a lesson - I cannot remember which building this dome adorns. Always take notes when you take photos; a picture is so much more worthwhile if we can put a name to it * See identifying note at the bottom of the page*

ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS

Just time here to mention a few other sites mainly on the left bank of the Seine, (and one on the right) for which I either had no time to visit, or too few photos to present.

MUSÉE D'ORSAY

Musée d'Orsay was originally designed as a railway station in the year 1900, serving the towns and cities of the southwest - a function it fulfilled until 1939. Post war, the station fell into disuse, and was nearly demolished before the decision was taken to transform the redundant building into an art gallery featuring works dating from the mid-nineteenth century. The manner in which the design of the station has been harnessed to show off the artwork to best effect has received many plaudits, and some regard a visit to the museum as a Parisian highlight.

THE SORBONNE

France's most famous college and university building stands in the Latin quarter on the left bank. Nowadays the Sorbonne comprises just a part of the University of Paris, but it is the historic heart of the university dating back to the late 12th century. Maybe the most attractive part of the building, as might be expected, is the chapel built in 1635.

THE PANTHÉON

The Panthéon, superficially resembling its truly ancient namesake, the 2000 year old Panthéon of Rome, was built on the orders of Louis XV when he was recovering from illness in 1744 and he dedicated it to St Genevieve, patron saint of Paris. After the end of France's revolution, the Panthéon became a mausoleum which now holds the remains of Voltaire, Victor Hugo, Emile Zola, Marie Curie and other luminaries.

The Palais du Luxembourg
The Palais du Luxembourg
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The rather small Statue of Liberty in the Jardin du Luxembourg - the very first bronze model of the famed American iconThe neatly laid out lawns and flower beds of the Jardin du Luxembourg. A popular yet tranquil place for Parisians to walkThis is a marble statue attributed to Michel Anguier who lived from 1613 to 1686 and believed to be called L'Hiver - The Winter  The Palace and lawns of the garden. Always try to include some foreground interest when taking photographs of this kind This attractive bronze sculpture dates from 1885 and is entitled Herd of Deer. It was created by Arthur Jacques Leduc
The rather small Statue of Liberty in the Jardin du Luxembourg - the very first bronze model of the famed American icon
The rather small Statue of Liberty in the Jardin du Luxembourg - the very first bronze model of the famed American icon
The neatly laid out lawns and flower beds of the Jardin du Luxembourg. A popular yet tranquil place for Parisians to walk
The neatly laid out lawns and flower beds of the Jardin du Luxembourg. A popular yet tranquil place for Parisians to walk
This is a marble statue attributed to Michel Anguier who lived from 1613 to 1686 and believed to be called L'Hiver - The Winter
This is a marble statue attributed to Michel Anguier who lived from 1613 to 1686 and believed to be called L'Hiver - The Winter
The Palace and lawns of the garden. Always try to include some foreground interest when taking photographs of this kind
The Palace and lawns of the garden. Always try to include some foreground interest when taking photographs of this kind
This attractive bronze sculpture dates from 1885 and is entitled Herd of Deer. It was created by Arthur Jacques Leduc
This attractive bronze sculpture dates from 1885 and is entitled Herd of Deer. It was created by Arthur Jacques Leduc
Sometimes it's a good idea to get down low and hide a boring expanse of lawn or concrete (or people or garbage bins) behind some foreground interest such as this flower bed
Sometimes it's a good idea to get down low and hide a boring expanse of lawn or concrete (or people or garbage bins) behind some foreground interest such as this flower bed

THE JARDIN AND PALAIS DU LUXEMBOURG

Finally (if you're in need of a little rest and recuperation before heading off to Page 2), close to the Sorbonne and the Panthéon is the Palais and Jardin du Luxembourg. The Palace was built in 1615 for Marie de Medicis, the mother of Louis XIII, and named for a local dignitary, the Duke of Luxembourg. Subsequently the Palace has served varied functions including those of a museum, a prison, one-time home of Napoleon Bonaparte, and even briefly the WW2 residence of Herman Goering during the Nazi occupation. Today the Palace serves a very important role as home to the French Senate.

The gardens are open to the public and are popular for recreation purposes, featuring an ornamental pool, formal gardens, many statues, and tennis courts - a pleasant place to escape from the city buildings for a few hours.

THE STATUE OF LIBERTY

Special mention should be made of one statue, which all Americans will recognise - well, not just Americans actually, but everybody in the world - because it is one of the most iconic images on Earth. The Statue of Liberty stands in the Jardin du Luxembourg. But make no mistake, this is not a copy - the one in New York City is the copy, albeit a vastly more impressive and bigger copy - this one is the original sculpted by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi in 1870, which served as the model for the statue gift to America, presented and dedicated, 16 years later.

The flowers of Jardin du Luxembourg
The flowers of Jardin du Luxembourg

CLOSING REMARKS

The Palais du Luxembourg concludes this little tour of the major attractions to be found within one kilometre of the River Seine in Paris. It is of course by no means complete - some buildings have only been viewed superficially, and indeed each and every one could be the subject of a page to itself. Some buildings which lie further afield, notably the Palace of Versailles and the Church of Sacre-Coure, have not been covered at all, but will be the subject of the next page in this series. Hopefully the photographic advice, limited though it is, may be of some value in helping some visitors to this great city to enjoy taking their pictures more whilst improving on their results. Further advice and information will follow in subsequent pages.

*FOOTNOTE - 'DOME' PHOTO IDENTIFICATION*

Since publishing, the dome in one of the pictures above has been identified. It is the dome of the Tribunal de Commerce, a law court dealing with trading and commercial matters. For the time being I will leave the caption above, as the lesson about taking notes when doing photography of this kind is an important one; travel guide pictures with identifying info are so much more useful than travel guide photos without identifying info.

Many thanks to Derdriu for providing the identification

Page 1: Sites to be seen in the centre of Paris, within one kilometre of the River Seine - Notre Dame, the Louvre, Place de la Concorde, the Grande Palais and Petit Palais, the Arc De Triomphe, Les Invalides, the Eiffel Tower, Palais du Luxembourg and others

Page 2: Sites to be seen beyond the banks of the river - the Palace of Versailles and Sacre-Coure. Also aerial views of Paris and additional notes

Page 3: The artistry and architecture of Paris - Decorative ornamentations, wall paintings, stained glass and statues, modern artists at work, and glittering lights

MAP OF ATTRACTIONS NEAR THE SEINE

show route and directions
A markerCathedral of Notre Dame -
Cathédrale Notre-Dame, 75004 Paris, France
[get directions]

B markerThe Louvre -
Musée du Louvre, 75001 Paris, France
[get directions]

C markerPlace de la Concorde -
Place de la Concorde, Paris, France
[get directions]

D markerGrand Palais -
Grand Palais, 1 Avenue du Général Eisenhower, 75008 Paris, France
[get directions]

E markerArc de Triomphe -
Arc de Triomphe, 75017 Paris, France
[get directions]

F markerLes Invalides -
Les Invalides, 70 Rue de Babylone, 75007 Paris, France
[get directions]

G markerEiffel Tower -
Eiffel Tower, 75007 Paris, France
[get directions]

H markerMusee D'Orsay -
Musée d'Orsay, 75007 Paris, France
[get directions]

I markerThe Pantheon -
Le Panthéon, 75005 Paris, France
[get directions]

J markerPalais du Luxembourg -
Palais du Luxembourg, 75006 Paris, France
[get directions]

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PLEASE ADD COMMENTS IF YOU WILL. THANKS. ALUN 25 comments

Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 months ago from Essex, UK Author

CYong74; Thanks Cedric for commenting and for the compliment. I agree about the route - and so easy too. Just follow the river! :)


CYong74 profile image

CYong74 3 months ago from Singapore

This is a wonderful route that no visitor to Paris should miss. Great pictures too! I long to be right there now.


visite parisienne profile image

visite parisienne 8 months ago from Paris

Nice pics!

If you want to discover the city anew, go for a guided visit! Always interseting : www.desmotsetdesarts.com/offres/visites-guidees-paris


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Greensleeves Hubs 11 months ago from Essex, UK Author

aesta1; thanks Mary very much. My visit to Paris was brief, but I will have to return soon I think, because there is so much I haven't yet really seen, including the interior of the Musee d'Orsay.


aesta1 profile image

aesta1 12 months ago from Ontario, Canada

What a comprehensive guide you have here. My favourite is the Musee d'Orsay. Of course, I always visit my favourites in the Louvre. Paris is really an exciting city.


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Greensleeves Hubs 2 years ago from Essex, UK Author

promisem; Thanks Scott. It's a really nice city isn't it? And quite easy for visitors to find their way around too. Cheers, Alun


promisem profile image

promisem 2 years ago

Wow. It's an ambitious hub and it works. Great photos. It makes me want to go back to Paris again.


elfinn 3 years ago

The photo missing a caption appears to be as Derdriu says le Dôme du Tribunal de Commerce by the Concierge along the River Seine.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thankyou travelholidays; I appreciate your comments on the information and photos and also on the presentation of the article. Glad you liked it.

By the way, I see you are quite new on HubPages, so my best wishes to you. Hope you find the site both useful and interesting to work on. Alun.


travelholidays profile image

travelholidays 3 years ago from India

The way of presentation is really nice. temping to read all your hubs:) Thanks for sharing all photos and great information !


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Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thank you Suki C for visiting and leaving that nice comment. Much appreciated!


Suki C profile image

Suki C 5 years ago from Andalucia, Spain

I love Paris and go whwnever I can - thank you for your great hub and lovely pictures :)


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Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Seafarer Mama; many thanks for visiting and for your generous comments, and also for sharing your memories. Hope you get to see all that you wish to on your next visit to Paris, including the Mona Lisa - something I didn't get the time to see on my brief visit.

Oh, and don't forget the wide angle lens! Alun.


Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama 5 years ago from New England

Thank you for this breathtaking tour of Paris, Alun! Brings back memories of my short tour of Paris with a friend in March of 1986, while on "holiday" from studying in Galway, Ireland.

It also brings home the location of some of the sites mentioned in Hugo's "Les Miserables." I climbed Notre Dame when I was there, and saw the famous bell. :0) Meeting some of the gargoyles along the way was fun!

Looking forward to visiting Paris with my daughter, and this time when the Louvre is open. We will enjoy seeing the original of "Mona Lisa," among others.

Thanks for this gorgeous and informative hub! When we do travel, I will make sure I have my husband bring his wide angle camera lens. :0)


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thanks GClark for visiting and commenting. Is that really true about the Eiffel Tower at night? Bizarre! Wonder how on Earth they can justify and police that one? Anyway - good job I wasn't planning on selling the pics - wouldn't want to end up in a French jail !!!


GClark profile image

GClark 5 years ago from United States

Enjoyed your photos - Paris is also one of my favorite cities and I visit every few years. Recently attended a photography workshop there in 2006. Did you know that legally you can't sell a photo of the eiffel tower taken at night? A tidbit of info picked up when there was a discussion about some legalities such as intellectual rights and so forth.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Many thanks Simone for visiting this page, and for your generous comments. Nice to hear you've been to Paris - it's a long way from San Francisco, but it is one of those cities which everyone should visit at least once in their lives if they ever get the chance. And yes, it is very photogenic.

One thing perhaps I might have recorded in the hub was that even many of the 'ordinary' buildings are also really attractive, many with balconies with ornate railings and other decorative features.

Thanks again. Alun


Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 5 years ago from San Francisco

I was just in Paris this summer and your Hub takes me right back to those wonderful memories. Is it not a magnificently photogenic city??

Thank you so much for sharing the beautiful photos- and interesting background- with us!


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thanks Richardmohacsi (Richard?)- it's a deal!It certainly was busy - I spent as much time as I could, out and about, dashing around, but still of course it wasn't possible to cover it all.

I see you've only just joined, but a quick glance at your first page suggests you'll be worth watching! Welcome to HubPages


richardmohacsi profile image

richardmohacsi 5 years ago from Florence

Good job Greensleeves. I live in Paris - it looks like you had a good busy 3 days. Next time you are over, drop me a mail! We could do a shoot together.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Many many thanks Derdriu for your comments. You are too kind. As I say early on in the piece, I do probably spend a little too much time taking photos and too little time taking in the atmosphere, but photos do give a lasting material memory of a place so I try to make best use of my time and get as many shots as possible - I probably walked further in 3 days in Paris than I'd walked in the previous 3 months combined!

Thanks so much for the info on the unidentified photo! I went through all the main attractions, in 'google images', but couldn't find that dome anywhere. Now I'm in two minds - I should re-caption the photo correctly, but the current caption serves a useful purpose as a lesson about the value of making information notes when taking photos like this. So what I'll do at least for the time being is leave the caption as it is, but append a note to the bottom of the page, with thanks.

Alun


Derdriu 5 years ago

Greensleeves Hubs: P.S. C'est le Dôme du Tribunal de Commerce de Paris, n'est-ce pas? Regarde: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tribunal_de_Comm...


Derdriu 5 years ago

Greensleeves Hubs: This is a gorgeously illustrated, stunningly written and tightly organized travel article on one of the many historic, picturesque areas around the Seine. It amazes me that you took all of these fantastic pictures in just three days. All of your comments and photos impact the French parts of my heart and ancestry. But in a way, I really, really love most of all your shot of the herd of deer. It and the surrounding vegetation are among my favorite memories from my visits to Paris.

Thank you for the eloquent words and evocative photos as well as the sage photography and travel advice and tips.

Voted up, etc.,

Derdriu


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thank you mbwalz for your appreciation. Even though I only live a short distance away across the Channel, it's the first time I've visited Paris since I was a child - It's an attractive city - I think I will have to return again! Really glad you like the photos.


mbwalz profile image

mbwalz 5 years ago from Maine

Those are really wonderful. I lived there and go back every chance I get (next summer!) I even have a website about Paris.

Thanks for the great pictures. They stir my heart!

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