Rock of Cashel Tour is a Stunning Display of Ireland's Past

The Rock of Cashel is one of Ireland's top tourist attractions. © Fáilte Ireland
The Rock of Cashel is one of Ireland's top tourist attractions. © Fáilte Ireland

A Rock of Cashel tour is a stunning monument to Ireland’s past that has mostly survived weather and time.

It also is a great tourist attraction for families, history buffs and anyone who loves exploring the ruins of an old castle.

Visitors who travel south from Dublin along highway M8 often take the exit R639 for the Rock of Cashel and Cashel town right next to it.

R639 is a countryside road that winds through farmland and green, rolling hills. Travelers may find themselves curing around a hill and seeing the massive Rock dominating the view. The complex rests atop a limestone hill in the Golden Vale in County Tipperary.

Historical sources date the site back to 450 AD, when St. Patrick reportedly converted Aengus, the King of Munster, to Christianity. King Aengus built there an extensive walled citadel to serve as a palace and defensive redoubt.

The lords of Munster ruled over much of southern Ireland from Cashel, otherwise known as the “city of kings,” starting in the 5th Century. In 1101, they gave control of Cashel to Christian monks who added the chapel, cathedral, towers, walls and other structures. It becomes the center of the Irish Church.

Today, the castle goes through periodic projects with restoration, but it doesn’t stop visitors from touring the remains. They include the restored Hall of the Vicars Choral, a 12th century round tower, High Cross and Romanesque Chapel, 13th century Gothic cathedral, 15th century Castle.

The tapestry inside the Hall of Vicar’s Choral, showing King Solomon with the Queen of Sheba, contains intentional errors to remind people that only God can create perfection.
The tapestry inside the Hall of Vicar’s Choral, showing King Solomon with the Queen of Sheba, contains intentional errors to remind people that only God can create perfection. | Source

Hall of Vicar’s Choral

Visitors park in a lot below the castle, walk up a road to the top and go through the small welcome center within the Hall of Vicar’s Choral. Residents built it in the 15th century.

After paying for tickets, they can veer to the immediate right for a brief tour of a small museum and what remains of interior rooms. The museum includes the original St. Patrick’s Cross as well as an audio-visual display.

Next, they can go straight outside for the views of the countryside and especially the ruins.

Once outside, note the seven-foot-tall carved rock that is a replica of St. Patrick’s Cross, which reputedly was the original coronation stone of the Munster kings.

But the real draw are the Bishop’s Castle on the left that overlooks the countryside, St. Patrick’s Cathedral almost straight ahead and Cormac’s Chapel to the right.

St. Patrick's Cathedral is massive and picturesque despite the missing roof. The church removed it to use its lead content for other purposes.
St. Patrick's Cathedral is massive and picturesque despite the missing roof. The church removed it to use its lead content for other purposes. | Source

St. Patrick's Cathedral

St. Patrick’s Cathedral consists of the south transept, the north transept, The Crossing and the Choir. It was built in 1169 and dedicated on March 17, St. Patrick’s Day.

The Earl of Kildare burned the cathedral in 1495. The earl told King Henry VII that he burned it because he thought the bishop was inside. Because of that response, the king appointed him Lord Deputy for Ireland.

Puritans pillaged the cathedral in 1647 and reportedly killed 3,000 people. Many of the dead were burned alive in the cathedral. It was rebuilt again but abandoned in 1748.

The cathedral walls still stand, but the roof is gone. But on a good weather day, the lack of a roof makes the view even more impressive.

The north transept offers one of the most photographed views of the cathedral with its tall arching walls outlined against clouds and blue sky. Note the carvings of beasts, apostles and other saints.

The 92-foot-tall round tower, standing in the right corner of the north transept, dates back to 995 AD. The early residents built it as a lookout for Vikings and later invaders.

To the right lies The Choir containing the Tomb of Myler MaGrath, the Protestant Archbishop of Cashel in the late 16th and early 17th centuries.

Midway between the north and south transepts is The Crossing, a majestic arch where the four the cathedral’s four sections come together.

The round tower acted as a watch tower for invading Vikings and other enemies for centuries.
The round tower acted as a watch tower for invading Vikings and other enemies for centuries. | Source

Cormac's Chapel

Cormac McCarthy, King of Desmond and Bishop of Cashel, built the red sandstone chapel in 1127.

The Romanesque chapel includes a remarkable but broken sarcophagus that may have been Cormac McCarthy’s final resting place.

At the time of this writing, the Chapel is undergoing restoration. Access is available only through guided tours.

The solemn Cashel cemetery has the remains of residents going back many centuries.
The solemn Cashel cemetery has the remains of residents going back many centuries. | Source

Cemetery and Outside Tour

The cemetery behind the cathedral is a solemn and photographic experience.

It has many plots of past bishops and other residents, some of which are so old that the names wore off the tombstones centuries ago.

The cemetery area also has some of the best external views of the chapel, cathedral, round tower and The Crossing.

Fees and Hours

Guided tours are available. It takes about one to two hours to tour the ruins depending on the number of photographs and whether visitors explore on their own or join a guided tour.

Opening Hours

  • Mid September to mid October daily: 9 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. Last admission at 4.45.
  • Mid October to mid March daily: 9 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. Last admission at 3.45 p.m.
  • Mid March to early June daily: 9 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. Last admission at 4.45 p.m.
  • Early June to mid September daily: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Last admission at 6.15 p.m.

Admission Fees

  • Adult: 6 Euros
  • Sen/Group: 4 Euros
  • Child/Student: 2 Euros
  • Family: 14 Euros

Town of Cashel

The town of Cashel makes a visit to the Rock of Cashel even more worthwhile.

Located only about a quarter of a mile from the castle, the town offers many small pubs and diners for anyone with time for lunch, dinner or a good Irish ale.

Anyone who spends more than 15 Euros in town at participating businesses will get a free admission to Rock of Cashel. Be sure to ask for the voucher from the business.

While in town, a quick attraction is St. John the Baptist Church, one of the oldest active Catholic churches in Ireland that dates back to 1795.

Rock of Cashel Map

A markerRock of Cashel -
Rock of Cashel, Co. Tipperary, Ireland
[get directions]

© 2015 Scott Bateman

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Comments 2 comments

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promisem 15 months ago Author

Thanks, Alex. I wish the weather that day had been better. And no photo can capture the atmosphere. It was quite solemn, almost eerie.


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alex35aclll 15 months ago from United Kingdom

Stunning photographs and amazing nature scenes

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    Scott Bateman (promisem)115 Followers
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    Scott Bateman is a professional journalist and online publisher. He writes often about travel, health and personal finance.



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