State High Points of the United States: A brief overview.

Denali, Alaska. Highest point in the United States.
Denali, Alaska. Highest point in the United States. | Source
From the summit of Cheaha Mountain, Alabama.
From the summit of Cheaha Mountain, Alabama. | Source
The final approach to the summit of Humphreys Peak, Arizona.
The final approach to the summit of Humphreys Peak, Arizona. | Source
The sign at the top of Arkansas.
The sign at the top of Arkansas. | Source
Summit of Mt. Whitney (right) from near Trail Crest. California.
Summit of Mt. Whitney (right) from near Trail Crest. California. | Source
Mount Whitney (left of center) seen from Lone Pine, California. Highest point in the United States outside of Alaska.
Mount Whitney (left of center) seen from Lone Pine, California. Highest point in the United States outside of Alaska. | Source
Mount Elbert from US 285.  Colorado.
Mount Elbert from US 285. Colorado. | Source
Mount Frissell, Connecticut from Bear Mountain.
Mount Frissell, Connecticut from Bear Mountain. | Source
Delaware's highpoint.
Delaware's highpoint. | Source
Florida high point marker.
Florida high point marker. | Source
Approaching Brasstown Bald, Georgia.
Approaching Brasstown Bald, Georgia. | Source
Mauna Kea, Hawaii, with its winter snow cap from the Pacific Ocean.
Mauna Kea, Hawaii, with its winter snow cap from the Pacific Ocean. | Source
Mount Borah, Idaho.
Mount Borah, Idaho. | Source
Hoosier Hill, high point of Indiana.
Hoosier Hill, high point of Indiana. | Source
The top of Iowa marker at Hawkeye Point.
The top of Iowa marker at Hawkeye Point. | Source
Mount Sunflower, Kansas.
Mount Sunflower, Kansas. | Source
Black Mountain, Kentucky.
Black Mountain, Kentucky. | Source
Summit of Driskill Mountain, Louisiana.
Summit of Driskill Mountain, Louisiana. | Source
Aerial view of the Mount Katahdin massive.  Maine.
Aerial view of the Mount Katahdin massive. Maine. | Source
Hoye-Crest historical marker marks the high point of Maryland on Backbone Mountain.
Hoye-Crest historical marker marks the high point of Maryland on Backbone Mountain. | Source
Mount Greylock, Massachusetts from US 7.
Mount Greylock, Massachusetts from US 7. | Source
The plaque at the summit of Eagle Mountain, Minnesota.
The plaque at the summit of Eagle Mountain, Minnesota. | Source
Mississippi's high point, Woodall Mountain summit.
Mississippi's high point, Woodall Mountain summit. | Source
Looking towards Taum Sauk Mountain, Missouri.
Looking towards Taum Sauk Mountain, Missouri. | Source
Montana's Granite Peak. Among the most difficult state high points to reach.
Montana's Granite Peak. Among the most difficult state high points to reach. | Source
Panorama Point, Nebraska.
Panorama Point, Nebraska. | Source
Boundary Peak, Nevada.
Boundary Peak, Nevada. | Source
Mount Washington, New Hampshire.
Mount Washington, New Hampshire. | Source
High Point, New Jersey with summit monument overlooking Lake Marcia.
High Point, New Jersey with summit monument overlooking Lake Marcia. | Source
Wheeler Peak, New Mexico, east aspect.
Wheeler Peak, New Mexico, east aspect. | Source
Mount Marcy, New York.
Mount Marcy, New York. | Source
Mount Mitchell, North Carolina.
Mount Mitchell, North Carolina. | Source
Looking down from White Butte, North Dakota.
Looking down from White Butte, North Dakota. | Source
The historical marker on Campbell Hill, Ohio.
The historical marker on Campbell Hill, Ohio. | Source

Alabama. Cheaha Mountain, 2405 feet, 733 meters. Description: High point on prominent mountain ridge. Access: Paved road close to summit. Features: State park with summit house and tower.

Alaska. Denali or Mount McKinley, 20,320 feet, 6196 meters. Description: Prominent mountain peak; highest point in the United States and North America. Access: Extreme; expeditionary/guided climb for experienced mountaineers only. Closest access is by propeller plane to base camp on glacier well below highest point. Denali National Park offers beautiful distant views of the peak and is accessible by motor vehicle Caveats: high altitude, extreme weather, avalanche, exposure.

Arizona. Humphreys Peak, 12637 feet, 3852 meters. Description: Prominent mountain peak. Easiest access: hiking trail which gains 3,300 feet from Arizona Snow Bowl.

Arkansas. Signal Hill on MagazineMountain, 2753 feet, 839 meters. Description: High point on prominent mountain. Access: short walk from paved parking lot/road. Features: State park with monument marker.

California. Mount Whitney, 14,505 feet, 4,421 meters. Description: Highest point in contiguous United States; prominent mountain. Access: 11 mile trail from Whitney Portal gains 6,100 feet. Caveats: high altitude.

Colorado. Mount Elbert, 14440 feet, 4400 meters. Description: Prominent mountain; highest in U.S. Rockies and second highest in contiguous United States. Access: Foot trail from base climbs 4,400 feet to summit. Caveats: high altitude.

Connecticut. Mount Frissell south slope, 2379 feet, 725 meters. Description: South shoulder of Mount Frissell, Massachusetts. Access: By Appalachian Trail.

Delaware. Ebright Azimuth, 447 feet, 136.2 meters. Description: Arbitrary point of land in piedmont with no prominence. Access: suburban street. Features: point of interest/historical marker.

District of Columbia, (Washington, D.C.). Fort Reno Park, Tenleytown, 409 feet, 125 meters. Access: Urban park accessible by automobile or foot.

Florida. Britton Hill, 345 feet, 105 meters. Description: high point of knoll in hilly Florida panhandle. Access: road/car. Features: Monument marker.

Georgia. Brasstown Bald, 4784 feet, 1458 meters. Description: Prominent mountain in southern Blue Ridge Mountains. Access: Paved road goes to within 500 vertical feet below summit. Features: Visitor center and lookout tower.

Hawaii. Mauna Kea, 13796 feet, 4,206 meters. Description: Prominent extinct shield volcano. Access: Cinder road travels to summit cones. Features: A number of astronomical observatories are located among summit cones.

Idaho. Mount Borah, 12,668 feet, 3,861 meters. Description: Prominent peak. Access: very steep foot trail gains 5,200’ in 3 and 1/2 miles. Features: Scene of a 7.3 magnitude earthquake in 1983 with visible fault-scarp at base of mountain. Caveats: difficult climb with some exposed portions.

Illinois. Charles Mound, 1235 feet, 376 meters. Description: high point of expansive mound. Access: dirt road. Features: sign, marker.

Indiana. Hoosier Hill, 1257 feet, 383 meters. Description: nondescript high point with little discernible prominence. Access: private property with public access; picnic table and sign.

Iowa. Hawkeye Point, 1,670 feet, 509 meters. Description: nondescript point on uplands with no significant prominence. Access: paved road on former farm land made public. Features: granite marker.

Kansas. Mount Sunflower, 4039 feet, 1,231 meters. Description: Arbitrary point of land with no noticeable prominence on high plains of western Kansas. Access: dirt roads. Features: impromptu sculptures, markers.

Kentucky. Black Mountain, 4145 feet, 1,263 meters. Description: High point on prominent ridge. Access: dirt road. Features: radar dome. Caveats: mountain privately owned by coal company; permission needed to access and ground unstable due to coal shafts.

Louisiana. Driskill Mountain, 535 feet, 163 meters. Description: high point of prominent piedmont hill. Access: dirt road used for hiking. Features: sign, cairn, and register box.

Maine. Baxter Peak, Mount Katahdin, 5268 feet, 1,606 meters. Description: highest point of prominent mountain. Access: various foot trails including Appalachian Trail. Features: northern terminus of Appalachian Trail.

Maryland. Backbone Mountain, 3,360 feet, 1024 meters. Description: Arbitrary high point on Maryland side of ridge; ridge reaches higher elevation in West Virginia as it runs 39 miles in length. Access: bushwhack hiking from US 219. Features: historical marker on Hoye-Crest.

Massachusetts. Mount Greylock, 3,489 feet, 1,063 meters. Description: Prominent mountain. Access: Paved toll road to summit or by various footpaths including Appalachian Trail. Features: Sixty foot Veterans War Memorial Tower, lodge, expansive parking lot; all part of Mount Greylock State Reservation.

Michigan. Mount Arvon, 1978 feet, 603 meters. Description: on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula; prominent highpoint in Huron Mountains. Access: more than a mile and a half bushwhack from nearest dirt road.

Minnesota. Eagle Mountain, 2,301 feet, 701 meters. Description: Prominent highpoint in Northern Minnesota Ranges. Access: 3.5 mile hiking trail. Features: Plaque on summit.

Mississippi. Woodall Mountain, 806 feet, 246 meters. Description: prominent hill in southern Appalachian piedmont. Access: road hike, open-country. Features: monument/plaque and also the scene of Civil War battle.

Missouri. Taum Sauk Mountain, 1,772 feet, 540 meters. Description: Prominent highpoint on broad summit with steep slopes in ancient St. Francois Mountains, among the oldest exposed rocks in the United States. Access: Road to within few feet of summit; also part of a state park. Features: Lookout tower and plaque as well as picnic tables.

Montana. Granite Peak, 12,799 feet, 3,901 meters. Description: Prominent mountain peak. Access: Long approach with difficult climb containing technical aspects. Caveats: Severe weather in season such as electrical storms in summer, Grizzly bears, exposure.

Nebraska. Panorama Point, 54,26 feet, 1,654 meters. Description: nondescript highpoint with no noticeable prominence on High Plains in southwest corner of state. Access: dirt road. Features: small monument.

Nevada. Boundary Peak, 13,147 feet, 4,007 meters. Description: sub-peak of higher neighboring Montgomery Peak in California with summit above timber line. Access: dirt road, foot trail, open-country hike. Caveats: high altitude, few sources of water.

New Hampshire. Mount Washington, 6,288 feet, 1,917 meters. Description: Prominent mountain; treeless, boulder strewn summit. Access: numerous hiking paths including the Appalachian Trail, toll-road, and cog railway. Features: observatory on summit along with parking area and cog railway station, visitor center and well-developed tourist amenities. Caveats: well-known for severe weather that changes quickly and includes some of the highest recorded wind speeds on earth.

New Jersey. High Point, 1,803 feet, 550 meters. Description: Highest point on prominent Kittatinny Mountain. Access: paved road within short walking distance. Access: car or Appalachian Trail. Features: 220’ obelisk with observation windows.

New Mexico. Wheeler Peak, 13,167 feet, 4,013 meters. Description: Highest peak of prominent mountain ridge with beautiful alpine tundra meadows. Access: hiking trail from Taos Ski Resort. Features: small historic monument on summit.

New York. Mount Marcy, 5,343 feet, 1,629 meters. Description: Prominent mountain. Access: Hiking trail which gains 3,300 feet from Marcy Dam. Features: summit plaque.

North Carolina. Mount Mitchell, 6,684 feet, 2,037 meters. Description: Highest peak of Black Mountains and highest point east of the Mississippi River. Access: by hiking trail or by toll road. Features: Large parking area within short walk to summit observation tower with well-developed tourist amenities; park of Mount Mitchell State Park.

North Dakota. White Butte, 3,508 feet, 1,069 meters. Description: Prominent butte formed from residual sedimentary rock. Access: foot trail on privately owned land opened to public with donation suggested at drop box.

Ohio. Campbell Hill, 1,548 feet, 472 meters. Description: Highest point of otherwise nondescript upland. Access: by car on the grounds of a vocational school opened to the public. Features: historical marker.

Oklahoma. Black Mesa, 4,973 feet, 1,516 meters. Description: Arbitrary point of land in namesake state park on expansive mesa which extends into neighboring Colorado and New Mexico. Access: foot trail. Features: granite marker.

Oregon. Mount Hood, 11,249 feet, 3,429 meters. Description: Prominent volcanic peak. Access: technical climb on glaciers for experienced mountaineers only. Caveats: changeable weather, glacial seracs.

Pennsylvania. Mount Davis, 3,213 feet, 979 meters. Description: High point on prominent plateau. Access: dirt road to summit. Features: observation tower and plaque.

Rhode Island. Jerimoth Hill, 812 feet, 247 meters. Description: Prominent hill. Access: footpath. Features: Not much; just a clearing in the woods. Well known in the past for being one of the most inaccessible high points because of property owner’s access although summit is owned by BrownUniversity an open to public.

South Carolina. Sassafras Mountain, 3,554 feet, 1,083 meters. Description: Prominent mountain. Access: Road to within 300 feet of summit. Features: small monument marker.

South Dakota. Harney Peak, 7,244 feet, 2,208 meters. Description: Prominent granite dome. Access: Three and one half mile hiking trail from Sylvan Lake. Features: Stone observation tower.

Tennessee. Clingmans Dome, 6,643 feet, 2,205 feet. Description: Prominent peak and highest point in Great Smoky Mountains and in Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Access: Paved road to within 300 vertical feet of summit. Features: Fifty foot observation tower.

Texas.Guadalupe Peak, 8,751 feet, 2,667 meters. Description: Prominent limestone peak in namesake national park. Access: Strenuous hiking trail climbs almost 3,000 vertical feet to summit. Features: pyramid monument.

Utah. Kings Peak, 13,528 feet, 4,123 meters. Description: Prominent peak. Access: Ten mile hike from closest trailhead. Caveats: High altitude, lightning storms in season.

Vermont. Mount Mansfield, 4,393 feet, 1339 meters. Description: Prominent mountain with treeless summit ridge. Access: dirt toll road to within one mile and 500 vertical feet of summit. Features: Ski area on slopes and mountain house at terminus of toll road.

Virginia. Mount Rogers, 5,729 feet, 1,746 meters. Description: Prominent mountain and most northerly of 5,000 foot peaks in southern Appalachians. Access: hiking trail including Appalachian Trail. Features treeless meadows and wild pony herd which roams the summit plateau.

Washington. Mount Rainer, 14,411 feet, 4,392 meters. Description: Prominent volcano with largest collection of glacial ice in contiguous United States. Access: Technical glacier climb for experienced mountaineers only or with guide. Caveats: Fast changing weather, seracs, high altitude.

West Virginia. Spruce Knob, 4,863 feet, 1,482 meters. Description: High point on prominent ridge. Access: Road. Features: Observation tower at summit.

Wisconsin. Timms Hill, 1,952 feet, 595 meters. Description: Highpoint of uplands. Access: road. Features: observation tower.

Wyoming. Gannett Peak, 13,809 feet, 4,209 meters. Description: Prominent peak in Wind River Range. Access: foot trail, and technical climb involving glacier crossing and belays up rock wall. Caveats: For experienced climbers only, long approach from any road, fast-changing weather, high altitude.

Disclaimer: Author assumes no liability for the intrinsic risks of travelling to and hiking among remote points of land and/or in mountains, backcountry, and private property. Use your best judgment and know your limits!

The top of Oklahoma. Black Mesa.
The top of Oklahoma. Black Mesa. | Source
Oregon's majestic, ice-covered Mount Hood.
Oregon's majestic, ice-covered Mount Hood. | Source
Observation tower, Mount Davis, Pennsylvania.
Observation tower, Mount Davis, Pennsylvania. | Source
Sign near Rhode Island's high point, Jerimoth HIll.
Sign near Rhode Island's high point, Jerimoth HIll. | Source
Harney Peak, South Dakota in the right background.
Harney Peak, South Dakota in the right background. | Source
The fifty foot spiral observation deck on Clingmans Dome, Tennessee.
The fifty foot spiral observation deck on Clingmans Dome, Tennessee. | Source
Guadalupe Peak from the west. High point of Texas.
Guadalupe Peak from the west. High point of Texas. | Source
Kings Peak, Utah from the north.
Kings Peak, Utah from the north. | Source
Mount Mansfield's Chin from the Nose. Vermont.
Mount Mansfield's Chin from the Nose. Vermont. | Source
Winter mantle on Mount Rogers, Virginia.
Winter mantle on Mount Rogers, Virginia. | Source
Mount Rainer, Washington. Northeast face.
Mount Rainer, Washington. Northeast face. | Source
Spruce Knob, West Virginia summit parking area.
Spruce Knob, West Virginia summit parking area. | Source
The lookout tower on Timms Hill, Wisconsin.
The lookout tower on Timms Hill, Wisconsin. | Source
Gannett Peak, Wyoming is one of the toughest state high points to reach.
Gannett Peak, Wyoming is one of the toughest state high points to reach. | Source

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Comments 6 comments

travelholidays profile image

travelholidays 3 years ago from India

Good collection of information about high altitude places in America. Mount Davis - Observation tower, is amazing !


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 3 years ago Author

travelholidays - thanks for taking an interest and reading! Mount Davis is indeed a great view!


bdegiulio profile image

bdegiulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

What a great idea for a hub. A one stop list of each states highest point. Great job. I grew up in RI and have driven past that sign for Jerimoth Hill countless times.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 2 years ago Author

bdegiulio - Happy to hear that you enjoyed reading!


OhMe profile image

OhMe 23 months ago from Pendleton, SC

This is a great list and I am sure I will be back. South Carolina's Sassafras Mountain isn't too far from where I live.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 23 months ago Author

OhMe - and it's accessible by car too as is Brasstown Bald, Mount Mitchell, and Clingmans Dome. Hope you get there some day.

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