Temples of Dwarhatta, Hooghly, West Bengal

Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : Singabahini Durga
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : Singabahini Durga
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : A decorated pillar
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : A decorated pillar
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple 3
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple 3
Goddess Dwarika Chandi
Goddess Dwarika Chandi
The temple of Goddess Dwarika Chandi
The temple of Goddess Dwarika Chandi
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : A Noble man smoking FARSHI
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple : A Noble man smoking FARSHI
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Hunting scene
Coronation of Rama?
Coronation of Rama?
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 1
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 1
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 2
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 2
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 3
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 3
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 4
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple :Boat ride 4
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple
Terracotta of Raj Rajeswari temple


Temples of Dwarhatta

Bengal is dotted with thousands of villages. Each of these villages is picturesque with lush green fields, small rivulets, big trees, small hay-roofed huts, ponds & one or more temples dedicated to gods & goddesses . The temples are an inseparable part of village life. They are the centres where religious ceremonies are performed, social gatherings occur & people in general come with various wishes in mind. From ancient eras, temples are being erected by the landlords or other rich persons. From the 7-8th century AD, temples in Bengal started to be decorated by terracotta figures & designs. This continued unabated up to 13th Century when Muslim invasion of Bengaloccurred. During the Muslim rule, temple construction had a setback. However, from 15th century AD, temple construction got a new impetus & temples started coming up in various parts of Bengal. This continues even today, though now-a-days the rate of construction of new temples has got a big slump.

The arrangement of terracotta figures in temple has a standard technique. The common scenes depicted in terracotta are scenes from the epics Ramayana & Mahabharata; from the life of Lord Krishna (Krishna Leela) & scenes from contemporary society. The terracotta works in temples reflect the condition of the society at that time.

Dwarhatta is a small village in interior Hooghly district in West Bengal, India. The nearest bus station is at Ramhatitala, about 3 km from Dwarhatta. Ramhatitala is about 12 kilometer from Haripal, the nearest railhead on Howrah-Tarakeswar line of Eastern Railway. It takes about 30 minutes’ brisk walk to reach the village through dusty & uneven road.

The village is an old one. The dilapidated mansions of the rich landlords of the yesteryears stand as living proofs of the once grandeur of the village. Deep inside the village, besides a small pond, there is a big Aat -chala (8-roofed) temple of relatively newer construction. This is the temple dedicated to the goddess Dwarika Chandi, the patron goddess of the village.

The original temple of the goddess Dwarika Chandi was constructed in 1764 AD. As it was destroyed by ruthless time & indifference of the owners, a new temple was constructed by the local landlord family Sinha Ray’s in 2006 AD. Inside, the beautiful idol of the goddess beacons all to come here & get permanent peace.

Next attraction of the village is a group of Shiva temples , 3 in number, of which two are in a very sorry state. Invaded by vegetations, they are on the verge of collapse. The third one is renovated, but has lost the ancient charm & its terracotta figures look rather artificial.

But the most impressive temple is a huge Aat-chala (8-roofed) brick-built temple, constructed in 1729 AD, & is known as Raj Rajeswari temple. The old temple with signs of neglect prominently displayed in its surroundings has some most beautiful terracotta works of 18th Century Bengal style. The porch & the pillars of the triple entrance of the temple are covered with exquisite terracotta figures & designs. Besides the usual war scenes between the monkey soldiers of Lord Rama & the demon soldiers of the Sri Lankan demon king Ravana as depicted in the great Hindu epic Ramayana, the terracotta works also display scenes from Lord Krishna’s life (Krishna Leela) as well as social scenes from the contemporary Bengal. One notable figure is of a nobleman smoking Farshi (an instrument for tobacco smoking still used by the rich in rural areas). There are also hunting scenes with hunters riding on horse, elephant & surprisingly, one camel.

Scenes from Krishna Leela are also prominently displayed, especially those of “Nouka Vilas” (Lord Krishna’s boatv ride). A figure of Goddess Durga & another of Goddess Kali are also visible, though the former is in a sorry state.

After visiting the place, I had mixed feelings in my mind --- on the one hand, a pride for being a member of a race so culturally minded even in medieval periods, & on the other a deep sorrow for the crumbling temples, which are our own history, but uncared for by the general Bengalis.

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Comments 6 comments

Purnasree Nag 4 years ago

Asisda.. considering it is your solo work, it speaks amply of your interest and photographic eye. It was a rare treat.

As for the caring of these priceless cultural evidence I am ashamed to acknowledge that we Bengalis are lazy and indifferent until it gets a tag of the Western world. If any of these temples ever get a foreign sponsor for its upkeep you will notice the immense concern we will exhibit and go out of our way to make things easier for them.. Have not yet gotten over our 200 years!!!


shyamchat profile image

shyamchat 4 years ago from Calcutta

The hunting scenes and boats are very interesting - wish I could view them larger !

What is the oldest existing terra cotta temple is Bengal?


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 4 years ago from Upstate New York

Awesome pics and good copy...who could ask for more? Thank you, I truly enjoyed this article. I wasn't aware of these beautiful temples and works of art in Bengal.


Nandini Datta 4 years ago

Lovely ..... Loved each of your capture !! Wish I could see them more large .... your photographs are inspiring me to visit the sites myself and take look at the splendor that has been there for ages .... !!


srsddn profile image

srsddn 3 years ago from Chandigarh, India

dr.asiskchatterji, Terracota figures at Raj Rajeswari Temple are really marvellous show of art prevalent at that times. The dedication of the sculptor as well as the people behind getting these temples done is praiseworthy. I am glad you endeavour to showcase all this in your Hubs. Thumbed up and awesome job.


soutan 2 years ago

I want to clear my confusion regarding structural temples in India.From Marshall's work on Indian art I came to know,structural temple making was started after AD 1000.Before that only cave temples were more concentrated.In your article above some temples are told to be constructed circa 500-600AD.Please clear my confusion .

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