The Victory Theater in Pictures; Poteau Oklahoma

Theater Origins in Poteau

In the late 1800's and early 1900's, there was a number of entertainment options in Downtown Poteau, Oklahoma. The first theater in Poteau was very Shakespearean in style. Called the Air Dome Theater, this was an open air theater that drew in people from miles around.

Besides theaters, Poteau also had a number of pool halls and other entertainment options. One of the best known of the time was the Poteau Opera House, which was located in the bottom floor of the McKenna Building. Ironically, the upstairs area was home of the Indian Territory Federal Courthouse, where Judge William H. H. Clayton presided for a time.

During the early 1900's, around 1910, what would come to be known as the Victory Theater was established.

The Comet Theater

First build around 1910, what would come to be known as the Victory Theater started life as a vaudeville stage. Known as the Comet Theater, this was the largest theater in the area.

Moving Pictures come to Poteau

The Comet Theater was to be short lived. With the popularity of moving pictures, the vaudeville stage no longer captured the public attention. In an effort to remain competitive, the owners constructed a smaller building next door and moved in a moving pictures theater, which took over the name of the Comet Theater.

After the new Comet Theater opened, the old vaudeville stage was closed and converted in to a new, state-of-the-art theater, complete with second floor balconies. While construction was going on, World War I broke out. Prior to the end of the war, the old Comet Theater reopened under the name of the Victory Theater. The building that was next door was gutted and sold, which then became a drug store.

The Comet Theater in Poteau around 1910

In this photo, both the new Victory Theater (middle of the photo) and the Comet Theater (right side of photo) can be seen.
In this photo, both the new Victory Theater (middle of the photo) and the Comet Theater (right side of photo) can be seen.

The Victory Theater and President Kennedy

The Victory Theater in Poteau continued to gain popularity. During World War II, it was a favorite destination point for troops stationed at Ft. Smith. During that time, the furthest that they were allowed to go during leave was Poteau.

Nearly 20 years later, the area surrounding the Victory Theater became host to one of the countries most celebrated presidents. Prior to President Kennedy's dedication at Big Cedar, Sen. Kerr had all of the official government cars lined up downtown. Flags representing every state were flown from masts drilled in to the sidewalk. Most obvious of all was the Victory Theater. The theater was decked out in U.S. flags and had the giant marque that read "Welcome President Kennedy".

Photo taken in 1965.  This is how the Victory Theater in Poteau would have looked during President Kennedy's visit.
Photo taken in 1965. This is how the Victory Theater in Poteau would have looked during President Kennedy's visit.
This photo of the Victory Theater area in Poteau was taken in the mid-1970's.
This photo of the Victory Theater area in Poteau was taken in the mid-1970's.

The Victory Theater Fire

During the 1960's and 1970's, the Victory Theater reached it's high point. By the mid-70's, the aging building had seen over 60 years of service and was showing wear. Still, it had outlasted the Ritz Theater and the Kemp Theater. After the Drive In theater opened, it still drew in people from all throughout the area. It had gone through desegregation and weathered that storm. But it was due for some major upgrades.

The end of the Victory Theater came in 1981. At this time, a small fire broke out in the control room and caught the flammable film on fire. The fire quickly spread through the adjacent buildings. All the firefighters could do was watch as historic building after historic building was engulfed in flames. As the fire reached Holton's Hardware, ammunition sold in that building began to ignite, sending people diving for cover.

In all, almost an entire city block was destroyed by that fire.

Following the fire, a group of local business men banded together to rebuild the heart of downtown. Today, Dewey Plaza serves as a sad reminder of one of Poteau's most iconic landmarks.

The Victory Theater Fire in 1981
The Victory Theater Fire in 1981 | Source

© 2015 Urbane Chaos

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Linnea Lewis profile image

Linnea Lewis 13 months ago from South Carolina, USA

It is amazing how a building can have such an interesting rich history. Thank you for sharing.

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