Waterfalls USA

Lower Yellowstone Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
Lower Yellowstone Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
Hawk Falls, Hickory Run State Park, Pennsylvania.
Hawk Falls, Hickory Run State Park, Pennsylvania.
Upper Yosemite Falls, Yosemite National Park, California.
Upper Yosemite Falls, Yosemite National Park, California.
Cloudland Falls, White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Cloudland Falls, White Mountains, New Hampshire.
The thread-like San Antonio Falls at the base of Mount San Antonio, California.
The thread-like San Antonio Falls at the base of Mount San Antonio, California.
Genesee River Falls, Letchworth State Park, New York.
Genesee River Falls, Letchworth State Park, New York.
American Falls, Niagara Falls, New York.
American Falls, Niagara Falls, New York.
Bridal Veil Falls, Provo Canyon, Utah.
Bridal Veil Falls, Provo Canyon, Utah.
Bridal Veil Falls from Yosemite Valley, California.
Bridal Veil Falls from Yosemite Valley, California.
Great Falls of the Potomac from the Maryland side.
Great Falls of the Potomac from the Maryland side.
Bushkill Falls, Pennsylvania.
Bushkill Falls, Pennsylvania.
Gibbes Falls, Crawford Notch, New Hampshire.
Gibbes Falls, Crawford Notch, New Hampshire.
Dingmans Falls, Pennsylvania.
Dingmans Falls, Pennsylvania.
Cataract Canyon, Uinta Mountains, Utah.
Cataract Canyon, Uinta Mountains, Utah.
Moss Glen Falls, Granville, Vermont.
Moss Glen Falls, Granville, Vermont.
Minnewassa Falls, Pipestone National Monument, Minnesota.
Minnewassa Falls, Pipestone National Monument, Minnesota.
Adams Falls, one of 24 named waterfalls in Ricketts Glen State Park, Pennsylvania.
Adams Falls, one of 24 named waterfalls in Ricketts Glen State Park, Pennsylvania.
Moss Glen Falls, Stowe, Vermont.
Moss Glen Falls, Stowe, Vermont.
A partially obscured view of 'The Pool' at the Flume, New Hampshire.
A partially obscured view of 'The Pool' at the Flume, New Hampshire.
Raymondskill Falls in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pennsylvania.
Raymondskill Falls in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pennsylvania. | Source
Gibbon Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
Gibbon Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
Alberta Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.
Alberta Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.
Chasm Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.
Chasm Falls, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.
Nojoqui Falls, near Solvang, California, in low volume.
Nojoqui Falls, near Solvang, California, in low volume.

Introduction. With the exception of Niagara Falls in New York most people associate the country’s waterfalls with California and the Pacific Northwest. Surprisingly the entire country has beautiful and impressive falls and cascades that can be found in just about every state. Anywhere where there are hills, mountains, or slopes with enough annual precipitation you will find some type of fall, cascade, rapid, rifle, or cataract. The United States is no exception and given the abundance of topographical relief it’s not surprising that the country has thousands of beautiful waterfalls. Many can be accessed within a few yards of the roadside while others require dedicated hikes – often up steep mountains or down canyons. There are different types of waterfalls too which are categorized by the waterfall enthusiast according to their appearance and volume: ribbon, cascade, sheet, block, tiered, rapids, plunge, fan, and horsetail, for example. Although not exhaustive , this is a short guide to the some of the best known, or most spectacular, waterfalls in the country.

New England. New England’s mountains and piedmont is naturally a playground for the waterfall enthusiast and there are hundreds of documented falls across these states. Connecticut has one of the finest in the region. Kent Falls, in the northwestern part of the state drops over 250 feet in six tiers - the highest cascade dropping 70 feet. The falls are the centerpiece of Kent Falls State Park in the Litchfield Hills. Farther to the north, Massachusetts has a beautiful fall in the Berkshires. Bash Bish Falls drops a total 200 feet into a large pool. The highest cascade has a single drop of 80 feet. New Hampshire’s White Mountains provide the momentum for the state’s great waterfalls that drop off polished granite cliffs. Arethusa Falls in Crawford Notch is a beautiful horsetail fall that fans over a granite outcropping along the Bemis Brook. Falling 140 feet Arethusa is often considered one of the two most spectacular in the state. In nearby Franconia Notch State Park is the famous Basin, a punchbowl fall. Although the drop is only 8 feet, the huge granite bowl of crystal clear emerald water is what is really on display here. Beaver Brook Falls in northern New Hampshire is visible from the road and drops 112 feet in tiers. It’s accessible and easy to photograph as well. Sabbaday Falls in Waterville, New Hampshire is a tiered fall of three drops totaling 40 feet. The smooth granite rock that the Sabbaday Brook has polished makes this one of the most remarkable in the state. A beautiful punchbowl, something the White Mountains are famous for, receives the falls at the base. The total drop of 640 feet makes Silver Cascades in Crawford Notch one of the highest in the state of New Hampshire. Silver Cascades can be viewed from the roadside (Route 302); the falls are slippery and dangerous causing a fatality in 1996. Glen Ellis Falls is probably the best know in New Hampshire. The Ellis River drops 64 feet in tiers with a single plunge of 54 feet. Even in low season Glen Ellis Falls has a powerful flow. A well marked path leads to the falls which is a popular destination. Across Route 312 from Glen Falls is Crystal Cascades, yet another beauty, which drops a total of 80 feet with a single fan fall of 60 feet in this tiered cascade. Access is via the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. Not to be missed in the White Mountains area the Flume Gorge and the Lost River Reservation. If you have limited time in the White Mountains try to see the Flume Gorge (Adult Admission $13.00) in Franconia Notch State Park which is an unbelievable combination of sheer-walled gorge, waterfalls, and giant potholes that is sure to wow the most passive observer. The Flume has a number of spectacular waterfalls that drops 55 feet before running through a narrow defile 80 feet deep. At the top of the walkway is the 25 foot horsetail AvalancheFalls. Continue on to The Pool, farther up the Flume Brook Trail, which is a 40 foot deep crystal pothole that no less mind boggling. Across the state line in Vermont, there are beautiful falls in all corners of this state, unlike New Hampshire where most the falls are in the White Mountain region. Starting in southern Vermont two remarkable falls worth visiting are on either side of the Green Mountain divide. The sluice-like Hamilton Falls in south eastern Vermont drops 125 feet in tiers with the greatest single drop of 80 feet through hardened schist. The gorge that the falls have carved is impressive enough and many consider this to be Vermont’s finest. It’s also fatal as many have died scrambling around the slippery rock. After crossing over to the west side of the Green Mountains another beautiful fall is Lye Brook Falls which cascades 160 feet making it one of the tallest in the Green Mountain state. The falls are reached by a steep 2.3 mile hike from the road. Central Vermont is rife with beautiful waterfalls especially in the Green Mountain National Forest. Moss Glen Falls near Granville along Route 100 is a beautiful 30 foot fan type fall that is accessed from a roadside pullout. Texas Falls, is accessible by a short walk from the road. The Hancock Brook cuts through a small gorge forming beautiful potholes while dropping 35 feet. Virtually across the road (Route 125) is Bailey Falls, which drops almost 70 feet in six tiers with a highest single drop of 16 feet. The nearby Falls of Lana twists and turns so frequently that’s its virtually impossible to view all four sections of this 100 foot tiered waterfall as the Sucker Brook makes its way down a steep ravine. In northern Vermont a number of falls are scattered on either slope of the Green Mountains. One of the best known is Bingham Falls near Stowe. Located off Route 108 Bingham Falls drops a total of 90 feet in five drops through deep pools and a rugged gorge. Although Bingham Falls is close to the road it is not easy to find. In the far north of Vermont the Mississquoi River's Big Falls drops through a narrow gorge. This tiered falls drops 40 feet in three plunges about 200 feet from the roadside. Maine has a number of waterfalls many of them powerful and well off the beaten track. Moxie Falls, about 60 miles north of Waterville, is probably the best known in the state. Moxie Falls plunges 90 feet into a deep pool and it has a strong flow year round. More subdued is Screw Auger Falls in Grafton Notch State Park. Dropping a total of 43 feet this beautiful waterfall has carved some impressive potholes through the Bear River. In Franklin County Angel Falls has a total height of 126 feet with a single drop of 90, said to be the single highest drop in the state. Although this is arguable, it’s a beautiful horsetail fall but not easy to get to. Finally Katahdin Falls in Baxter State Park is a remote fall but with an astounding leap of 800 total feet –and one horsetail drop of 300 feet – clearly the highest in Maine if not New England. It is an isolated fall high on the slopes of the Katahdin massive which requires a dedicated hike along the AT to reach.

New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey. The best known falls in New Jersey are the impressive and heavy volume PassaicFalls, or Great Falls of the Passaic, located in the city of Passaic. Although the drop is only 77 feet, by volume this is one of the larger in the United States. It is now a National Historic Landmark because of its former connection with industrial development. Pennsylvania has an abundance of falls many of which have easily cut through the soft shales and sandstones that are so abundant in the state but the greatest concentration of falls is in the northeastern part of Pennsylvania, generally referred to as the Pocono region. The list is too exhaustive to include in this page but these falls, selectively, are worth any effort. The Kitchen Creek Falls is in a very isolated state forest natural area and requires almost 8 miles of steep round trip hiking. Although not especially high this sheet cascade falls through an equally beautiful gorge. Farther to the east is Ricketts Glen State Park which has no less than 24 named falls, the highest of which, Ganoga Falls, plunges 94 feet. The falls require some hiking but it’s a spectacular collection of falls that can be seen on the loop trail. Mostly in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area a large concentration of waterfalls tumble from tributaries that feed into the Delaware River. These include Raymondskill Falls (105’), Fulmer Falls (55’), Silver Thread (80’) and Dingmans Falls (130’), the last of which is the most impressive. All are accessible via short trails. Privately owned with an entrance fee, Bushkill Falls is also in the vicinity. Bushkill has a fine assortment of falls, cascades, pools, and flumes and is worth the entrance fee. In total there are eight falls, the tallest over 100 feet. Hawk Falls in Hickory Run State Park is a beautiful 25 foot fall that drops into a big pool and is easily reached by a short trail that connects to the roadside. New York has a number of impressive falls no doubt topped off by Niagara Falls whose American and Luna Falls are on the U.S. side. These are among the largest waterfalls on the planet by volume although they only drop about 180 feet in a block. The sheer volume of these falls is mind boggling so don’t let the overdevelopment turn you off. After all resorts were developed here close to two hundred years ago because people were curios as they still are today. Another high volume falls in New York is in Letchworth State Park. These area known as Niagara Escarpment falls, including the High Falls in downtown Rochester. The Lower, Middle and Upper falls of he Genesee River in Letchworth State Park are large by anyone’s imagination and among the biggest on the East coast. The more than 500 foot deep gorge they flow through is no less impressive. Not to be outdone is Taughannock Falls in the namesake state park. While this is not an escarpment fall, it is often considered the tallest in New York, dropping 215 feet in a single plunge into sheer walled gorge. Watkins Glen State Park at the southern end of the Finger Lakes has an impressive number of waterfalls in addition to the beautiful jaw-dropping narrow gorge that they run through. Don't miss Kaaterskill Falls when in the Catskills, the jewel of the Catskills, and one of the highest in the state. It drops a total of 230 feet in two plunges. It is located off NY 23A.

Mid Atlantic. Virginia’s mountains give it plenty of slopes to produce magnificent falls. The Blue Ridge Mountains have the most impressive in the state and are often accessible by road and short hikes. White Oak Canyon in Shenandoah National Park has a total of six falls, the tallest dropping 86 feet. Dark Hollow Falls, also in the park, drops 70 feet and is very close to Skyline Drive. Crabtree Falls in George Washington National Forest in Nelson County is the granddaddy of the state’s waterfalls and is considered by many to be the tallest falls in the Eastern United States. Crabtree Falls tumbles about 1000 feet in a series of five cascades with a single drop of 400 feet. While the base of the falls is close to the roadside, a dedicated hike is required to view the entirety. Sharing the falls with Maryland the more famous Great Falls of the Potomac in northern Virginia cascade 76 feet down a rocky face and are a high volume fall. These falls mark the farthest navigable point of the Potomac (barring man-made locks) and the fall line where the piedmont meets the coastal plain. The Great Falls are administered by the National Park Service (entrance fee) on the Maryland side and by a county park on the Virginia side. Maryland has a number of falls along its fall-line such as Gunpowder Falls which typifies the meeting of piedmont and coastal plain known as the fall line. These falls are usually heavy volume cataracts and can often be found when a river crosses from piedmont to coastal plain. Farther west in Maryland’s mountains are a number of cascades worthy of mention. Cunningham Falls in the Catoctin Mountains is a 78 foot tiered cascade that cuts through soft, sedimentary rock. In extreme western Maryland is Swallow Falls State Park which contains Maryland’s highest fall – Muddy Creek Falls which drops 53 feet. West Virginia’s Blackwater Falls is the state’s most famous and has a beautiful 62 foot cascade over a rather wide sheet of rock and into a deep pool.

Midwest. Michigan is probably the best place to see waterfalls in the Midwest as the state is well endowed with falling waters that cut down towards the Great Lakes, however most of them are on the Upper Peninsula which is a far corner of the country. Laughing Whitefish Falls in Alger County slides 100 feet off a limestone escarpment and requires a one mile hike to reach. Munising Falls, perhaps Michigan’s most picturesque, free falls 50 feet into a beautiful pool as it tumble gently over a sandstone bluff. It is located in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Alger County. The best known in the state are the upper and lower Tahquamenon Falls, a block waterfa ll over a 200 foot wide rock, that drop almost 50 feet. They area located in Tahquamenon State Park in Luce County. Minnesota has also a number of waterfalls worth your while. Start in downtown Minneapolis and you will see the beautiful and powerful Minnehaha Falls, a jewel in a beautiful urban park. Minnehaha Falls has a free 53 foot drop into a pool and is in Minnehaha Park. Gooseberry Falls State Park along Lake Superior’s shore contains the namesake falls which makes some incredible voluminous leaps. Pipestone National Monument located on the prairie in southwest Minnesota has Winnewissa Falls which cuts through quartzite and falls about 20 feet. Located in Wisconsin, Amnicon Falls State Park has a high volume fall that cuts through ancient basalt. It is easily viewed from a footbridge. Comparatively the 29 foot Copper Falls, also in a state park of the same name, flows through a canyon before the Bad River and Tyler Fork join. Farther downstream the dramatic Brownstone Falls spills over a ledge into a gorge between 60 and 100 feet deep. In south central Ohio Hocking Hills State Park has an impressive waterfall, Cedar Falls, which drops 50 feet over a sandstone cliff into a deep pool. Besides waterfalls the area is well known for caves, cliffs, and gorges. Ash Cave Falls is in the same park and drops almost 100 feet in a single thin ribbon onto the floor of cave that looks like a roofless natural rock dome. Brandywine Falls in Cuyahoga Valley National Park cascades 60 feet over rocky terraces and has heavy flow. There area number of other escarpment type falls in northern Ohio, such as Chagrin Falls (22’) which have heavy flows and drain into Lake Erie. Indiana too is not without some spectacular falls. The northern part of the Hoosier state has some escarpment falls while the rugged southern part has some beautiful cascades most notably Clifty Falls which contains two drops and a nice gorge. Missouri, in the lower Midwest, has a number of falls in the southern part of the state – the limestone Ozark Plateau, which is well known for caves, springs, and deep meandering gorges. Grand Falls near Joplin (15’) is a very wide block fall while Roaring River Spring Fall (90’) is more typical of the Ozark area falling into a deep defile. Mina Sauk Falls (132’) located near the state’s high point Taum Sauk Mountain (1772’) is more voluminous and typifies mountain falls that are found farther to the east.

South. In the South, North Carolina arguably tops the list with the most impressive falls although there is good competition from both Georgia and Tennessee, and even Kentucky, where Cumberland Falls, the state’s most famous, spills 68 feet over a sandstone ledge 125 feet wide. This block type falls makes it the largest by volume in the South. Tennessee has beautiful falls on its side of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Abrams (20’) and Laurel Falls (75’) draw visitors by the droves and are famous for their beautiful rhododendron blossoms that frame the falls. Farther to the west the Fall Creek Falls plunges 256 feet in a single drop and stakes the claim of having the highest free drop in the eastern United States. There area numerous other waterfalls in this same state park which makes it a magnet for waterfall enthusiasts. Georgia’s Blue Ridge has a number of fine waterfalls including Amicalola Falls, the tallest in the state, which drops 729 feet in a series of cascades. Nearby DeSoto Falls drops a total of 480 feet in three leaps of which the highest single leap is 200 feet. Anna Ruby Falls (small admission fee) has two separate falls dropping 150 and 50 feet respectively. Alabama also has a Desoto Falls in the northeastern park of the state, which drops into a spectacular water-filled sinkhole in a single 104 foot plunge. In Gadsden, Alabama is the Noccalula Falls with a 90 foot fall into a gorge. South Carolina has a number of beautiful mountain cascades in its northern slice of Blue Ridge namely Isaqueena Falls, Kings Creek Falls (65’), and Raven Cliff Falls, the tallest in the state at 320’. North Carolina has the lion’s share of spectacular mountain cascades some of which drop down slick, bare granite faces and others that provide slides across smooth rock. Whitewater Falls in Jackson County drops 411 feet is a beautiful tiered cascade. Lower Whitewater Falls, across the state line in South Carolina drops another 300 feet. Bridal Veil Falls, one of many so-named in the country, near Brevard in DuPont State Forest is a classic cascade slide that glides 120’ down slick rock. The falls have also formed some huge potholes. Close by is Dry Falls which is an impressive plunge falls that drops 65 feet. Not be missed along the Blue Ridge Parkway Mile 340 is Crabtree Falls a beautiful 70 foot cascade accessible by a trail about 1 mile fro m the road. Along Highway 64 Cullasaja Falls is one of the state’s most famous. A 200 foot cascade has a beautiful plunge pool at the base and is popular with waterfall enthusiasts. Linville Falls, close to the Blue Ridge Parkway, is a tiered 150 fall that drops into a huge pool. Soco Falls, near Maggie Valley, and also close to the Parkway, is set under a beautiful forested canopy. While it takes some work to find it the falls its worth the effort as two falls from opposite streams plunge to meet at the base.

Great Plains. The Great Plains aren't known for waterfalls but there are a many across the great river systems that eventually drain into the Mississippi. One exception to these common block-like falls that drain the Plains are the mountain cascades in South Dakota's Black Hills. Roughlock Falls is beautifully framed by a forest of cottonwood and drops 30 feet. It is the most well-known falls in the Black Hills region. Bridal Veil Falls, also in the Black Hills, drops about 50 feet, and can be viewed from the roadside in Spearfish Canyon. The falls on the Big Sioux River in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in contrast to the mountain cascades of the Black Hills, are an excellent example of the many block falls on the Plains and drop about 50 feet across wide ledges. Nebraska has a few surprises of its own, one of which is the 63 foot Smith Falls near Valentine along the Niobrara River. It is in the Smith Falls State Park which is in the Sand Hills a vast area of wind-blown loess deposits that are easily eroded by water-action. About forty miles to the southwest the Snake River, a tributary of the Niobrara, falls over a wide ledge in a perfect setting of pine trees. A small admission is charged to visit the falls. Although not as high as Smith Falls, the Snake River Falls are the largest in the state by volume. Probably the best known falls in the state of Oklahoma are Price and Turner Falls near Chickasaw National Recreation Area in southern Oklahoma’s Arbuckle Mountains. Turner Falls drops 77 feet in a fan and is the centerpiece of Turner Falls Park. In the northeastern part of Oklahoma Natural Falls State Park has a fall that plunges 77 feet and is easily accessible. Most of Texas’s falls occur at the edge of the granite Hill Country as it meets the coastal plain to the east. A fall line of sorts, Pedernales and McKinney Falls are the best known in the state. Of the two, which cut through limestone rocks, McKinney is more impressive as it tumbles over a wide ledge and into deep pools from upper and lower cataracts. Both are located in state parks of the same name.

Rocky Mountain West. The Rocky Mountain states have some exceptional falls, some well visited but many off the beaten path and virtually unknown to the visitor. It’s not unreasonable to assume that some are even a few undiscovered to this day in the vast mountain wilderness in parts of these states. New Mexico’s dry climate does not lend the state well to waterfalls but they exist. Sitting Bull Falls in the state’s Guadalupe Mountains drops 130 feet over travertine that it has helped deposit. Colorado’s mountains are well watered and this has endowed the state with countless falls and cascades. Near Telluride in the southwestern part of the state is Bridal Veil Falls which leaps 365 feet over a cliff. Fish Creek Falls in the north central part of the state drops 283 feet in a voluminous plunge into a canyon. Popular with tourists, it is accessible by a short trail from the road. Outside of Colorado Springs is Seven Falls which drops 181 feet. It is accessible by staircase and is quite a tourist draw. Rocky Mountain National Park has a number of beautiful waterfalls some close to the road and others more inaccessible. Chasm, Horsetail, and Alberta Falls area within a short walk of the road whereas Ouzel Falls requires quite a hike. They are all worth viewing. Wyoming’s best known waterfalls are in Yellowstone National Park in the northwest corner of the state. This park is well known for other things besides hot springs and waterfalls are as equally abundant and impressive. Abundant lakes, precipitation, and snowmelt allow rivers to easily channel the soft volcanic rock and the results are varied from huge, voluminous falls seen along the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone to gentle cascades, such as Gibbon Falls which spills 84 feet. The Upper (109’) and Lower (308’) Falls of the Yellowstone are the largest in the Rocky Mountain region and one of Yellowstone’s great spectacles. These are high volume block falls that have cut a tremendous canyon. Farther downstream along the Yellowstone River is Tower Falls (132’) another big drop with high volume. Other falls in the park, many of which require long hikes, are as follows: Ouzel (235’), Colonnade (100’), Union (260’), Lewis (29’), Fairy, Mystic, Firehole (39’), and Undine (59’). In Wyoming's Bighorn Mountains, don't miss Shell Falls, which drops 120 feet in one fall. The falls are accessible by driving up Shell Canyon off Route 14. Montana has a good mix of voluminous falls along its Great Plains river system and dazzling mountain cascades. Bird WomanFalls in Glacier National Park drops 492 feet off the face of Mount Oberlin and is viewable from Going-to-the-Sun Highway. Great Falls (187’) and Rainbow Falls (47’) are both located on the Missouri River and are block type spills. Idaho has a great mix of falls from voluminous block falls that drain its volcanic Snake River Plain in the south to moisture-laden mountain cascades in its forested panhandle. Upper and Lower Mesa Falls on the Henrys Fork are 114 and 65 feet in height and cut through volcanic rock. They are scenic and high volume with great widths. Farther down stream, near the city of Twin Falls, is Shoshone Falls, know as the “Niagara of the West” for good reason. Dropping 212 feet the volume of this falls makes it one of the biggest in the United States as it drops into a walled canyon. SelwayFalls, Moyie Falls (120’), and Smith Falls are all located in the panhandle and are close to roadsides. Utah has a few falls worth mentioning. Bridal Veil Falls, located along the roadside (U.S. 89) in Provo Canyon is a 607 foot double cataract cascade. Calf Creek Falls in southern Utah is a tiered cascade that drops 214 feet in total but requires a 5.5 mile roundtrip hike.

Arizona and California. Arizona has a number of waterfalls that pour off the tributary canyons of the Grand Canyon and down the Mogollon Rim. These falls require dedicated hikes, sometimes overnight, but the setting is Shangri-la like, hidden, utterly isolated, and beautifully surrounded by high canyon walls with just enough vegetation to provide some much needed shade in the summertime heat. Havasu Falls is one of these locations, located deep in a canyon on the Havasupai Indian Reservation (permit required) that runs northward into the Grand Canyon. The falls have built up an impressive travertine dam and the water from the natural pool is a beautiful light emerald. The falls drop 120 feet. Below Havasu Falls is Mooney Falls and above it are located Navajo and Supai Falls making Havasu Canyon a gem for waterfall buffs. Below the North Rim of Grand Canyon along the Bright Angel Trail is Ribbon Falls which falls 140’ over a sandstone cliff. Cibecue Falls, located in the highlands of eastern Arizona, is another gem. These can be reached by a mile long hike from the Salt River Canyon. California has some of the highest waterfalls on the earth found mostly in Yosemite National Park. Here rivers flow over glacially sculpted U-shaped valleys and drops of a thousand feet are not uncommon. Most of the highest falls can be seen in Yosemite Valley. Their sheer height is dazzling and defies explanation. There are so many of them too that it would be difficult to mention them all. Essentially they are high volume cascades and horsetails, some of which might even be considered block-type plunges, which include: Vernal (317’), Illilouette (370’), Silver Strand (574’), Nevada (594’), Bridal Veil (620’), Ribbon (1612’), Sentinel (1920’) and Upper and Lower Yosemite which have a combined drop of 2425 feet. In Sequoia National Park, Tokopah falls drops 1200 feet and can be reached by a 1.7 mile hike from the Lodgepole Ranger Station. Also in Sequoia National Park is Grizzly Falls, a 100' drop along the Grizzly Creek, that is easily accessed from the road. Surprisingly southern California has some falls too. The best collection is probably near the village of Forest Falls along the Mill Creek in the San Gorgonio Mountains east of Redlands. San Antonio Falls is another that can be found at the base of Mount Baldy near Los Angeles. Other falls in southern California include a mix of emphemeral falls such as Tahquitz Falls outside of Palm Springs and Holy Jim Falls on the way to Santiago Peak in Orange County. The amount of rainfall and season will determine the water levels. Also worth seeing is Nojoqui Falls in the Los Padres National Forest which cascades year round down a 164 foot drop. Unlike most falls, Nojoqui Falls deposits calcium carbonate which gorws the headwall outward rather than eroding it. A short ten minute hike from the roadside park reaches the bottom of this beautiful fall.

Oregon and Washington. Multnomah Falls in Oregon has spectacular 630 foot two-fall tiered drop into a deep gorge the higher of which is 542 feet. It is the tallest waterfall in the state and accessible by car. Washington state also has a number of voluminous falls that combine power and height. Boston Creek Falls in the North Cascades is one of the highest dropping 1627 feet. Bridal Veil Falls is a tiered fall on the South Fork of the Skykomish River which drops 1327 in four plunges. Palouse Falls, in contrast, cuts through volcanic rock in the Snake River drainage and drops 200 feet in two powerful falls. Sulphide Creek Falls in North Cascades National Park is estimated to be as high as 2200 feet. It requires a hike in the backcountry with no trail access.

Hawaii. Waterfalls easily come to mind when one mentions Hawaii. Its lush tropical rainforests combined with sheer walled volcanic cliffs provide exceptional waterfalls that are dazzling. On the Big Island of Hawaii Akaka Falls plunges 442 feet in a single leap. Hiilawa Falls, also on the island of Hawaii, drops a total of 1450 feet with one drop measuring 1200’. The tallest in the state is the tiered waterfall of Kahiwa on Molokai which falls a total of 2165 feet. It’s no surprise since Molokai has some of the highest sea cliffs on the earth. Olo’upena Falls also on Molokai is considered the fourth tallest on the earth and in total its four falls drop 2953’.

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Prairies USA The National Grasslands of America's Heartland

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Comments 23 comments

Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 6 years ago from Upstate New York

Lovely hub, wonderful pics, thank you!


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Paradise7: Thank you so much for visiting and I am glad you enjoyed - check back as I will update as I visit more falls.


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 6 years ago from malang-indonesia

This was amazing hub. I really liked all information here. Waterfall is beautiful place for tourism object. And I found complete info about waterfall in USA from you. This special hub. thumbs Up and I rate this.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

prasetio30: I appreciate your kind comments and for taking the time to visit my site. The nice thing is that you can find waterfalls everywhere in the world


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

These waterfalls are gorgeous. The Genessee River Falls are huge! I love them all. Thank you for this treasure. This is a great Hub!


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jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

James - that is a huge waterfall - I took that photo in high flow, very impressive and I appreciate your taking time to look!


Sandyspider profile image

Sandyspider 6 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

Amazing waterfalls. Thanks for sharing this.


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jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Sandyspider - thank you for visiting. I'm glad you enjoyed!


Shawn Price 6 years ago from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Some very nice pictures of waterfalls! Thanks for sharing.

Have you ever been to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada? We have 138 waterfalls within our borders. You should plan a trip here to do some "Waterfalling". We have all sizes and shapes.

For further information, please visit our websites www.cityofwaterfalls.ca, and www.cityofwaterfalls.ning.com and you can find us on Facebook at Hamilton-The Waterfall Capital of the World!

I look forward to seeing more of your pictures on everywhere you visit. THANK YOU!!


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Shawn - Thanks very much for viewing and giving me those links to Hamilton. I had no idea it had so many waterfalls! I passed through Hamilton once on my way to Toronto, but was unaware of the falls. I will be sure to stop next time and spend more time - it looks like a beautiful city and the wateraflls only enhance that.


Shawn Price 6 years ago from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

You are welcome. By the way, what is your first name so that I can address you accordingly?

When you are coming to Hamilton please let me know and I will introduce you to the Founder/Creator of Hamilton The City of Waterfalls - Mr. Chris Ecklund. Also, I can arrange for myself and our other Trail Master - Jeremy Shortt to meet with you and go with you to a few Waterfalls. When we do our Waterfalling, we visit 4-6 Waterfalls in one outing that lasts from 2-4 hours. You will be amazed at some of the Waterfalls we have and their surroundings. Maybe, we can arrange to do a Waterfall Illumination at night. When we do them, they look so awesome. Have you seen some of our Waterfall Illumination pictures and videos? For the videos, Chris has developed our own You Tube Channel. Just go to You Tube and type in Waterfalls in Hamilton or The City of Waterfalls and that will take you to some videos for your perusal.

Are you on Facebook?? If so let me know and you will be able to see a lot more videos and pictures and meet some of our volunteers and Waterfall enthusiasts. Thank you!


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Shawn - thank you again. It might be sometime before I'm back in that area, but appreciate your kind offers. It sounds very exciting nonetheless. Joseph Hirniak


ExpandYourMind profile image

ExpandYourMind 6 years ago from Midwest USA

Ahhhhh . . . Beautiful


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

There are so many gorgeous waterfalls in so many places as you nicely outlined. Enjoyed the photos.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Peggy W - Too many to describe on this page - you are correct.


Row 6 years ago

Did you forget Shell Falls in the Big Horn Mountains of Wyoming? Hwy 14, a route from Yellowstone to the Black Hills, will take you by this gorgeous falls.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 6 years ago Author

Row - thanks for letting me know about Shell Falls - I will add it to the page.


Cassidella profile image

Cassidella 5 years ago

Simply beautiful natural treasures...nice pics! Very informative hub on many waterfalls in the USA. Thanks for sharing.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 5 years ago Author

Cassidella - many thanks for visiting and commenting and I am glad you enjoyed the hub! I hope you get a chance to see some of the falls sometimes.


brianlokker profile image

brianlokker 4 years ago from Washington DC metro area

This is a great survey of U.S. waterfalls -- some I've seen, many I hadn't heard of. Pleased that you mention the Great Falls of the Passaic River in New Jersey. As you say, others in the northeast are quite impressive too.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 4 years ago Author

Brianlokker - Thank you. There are so many beautiful falls around the country and the less accessible, the less known, despite being impressive. I wil add falls to this as I 'find' more. Thanks for viewing.


Amanda108 profile image

Amanda108 17 months ago from Michigan, United States

Wow, what an overview! The beautiful pictures presented here were a delight to look at! Unfortunately, while I live in Michigan, I've yet to see Tahquamenon Falls. It's on the bucket list though! But like you said: the Upper Peninsula is a bit out of the way, even for those of living 'near' it.


jvhirniak profile image

jvhirniak 17 months ago Author

Amanda - thank you for your kind comments. I'm sure that the Lower Peninsula was some waterfalls as well, maybe closer to you, and hope you get a chance to see Tahquamenon sooner rather than later. Beautiful!

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