Observing summer wildflowers of Southern Ontario, Western NY and Michigan while hiking with our dog

K2 looks at the slopes of a ravine.
K2 looks at the slopes of a ravine. | Source

K2, our Kuvasz boy, looked at the slope of a small ravine. It was not a casual glance. There was no wild animal to arouse his interest in the slope. Out of curiosity, we looked too. Thousands of white, yellow, red, moave, and violet wildflowers of several varieties were blooming on the slope. The scent of flowers, the odor of slightly damp grass and ferns and fragrance of wood and leaves of some nearby trees all mixed up to give an entrancing aroma of its own.

In trance.
In trance. | Source
My son opens up a guidebook and tries to identify a flower.
My son opens up a guidebook and tries to identify a flower. | Source

The wind was blowing ever so lightly, making us feel as if the foliage and nearby trees were whispering a lullaby. That was what had attracted K2’s attention. He stood there for a minute, taking in the scenery, and then plunged in the thick foliage. The flowers shook vigorously as he did that. He started smelling the flowers, curious as to what so many of them were doing there.

Or it could have been a scent left by a coyote, raccoon, or even a rabbit, we were not sure, except when he decided to lie down there deep in the foliage, taking a breather from a hot and humid summer day conditions and, in a half sleep and half ecstatic posture, casually took a bite or two at the nearest flowers.

Why do hiking for the sake of hiking only? Why not connect with nature, for example, with wild flowers, at micro level? It is soothing for mind and body you know.

Flowers have taken spots on thin soil over exposed rock.
Flowers have taken spots on thin soil over exposed rock. | Source

When we looked for them, the Mother Nature rewarded us with the sights of wildflowers blooming in the summer in every nook and corner of the wild.

We observed those flowers taking up every niche of the landscape available from worked up soils to the small cracks among the otherwise impervious rocks.

K2 trying to smell wildflowers scents coming from the ravine.
K2 trying to smell wildflowers scents coming from the ravine. | Source

In this article I am producing some wildflowers that we observed during our summer season hikes. Most of these flowers are omnipresent in the eastern USA and Canada. I am also giving advice on which one you can pick freely for decoration.

Please note that all these pictures have been taken using my characteristic hike-see-point-shoot technique of photography, using my blackberry this time. I didn’t really work on my shots like nature photographers typically would.

Also, I will appreciate if the readers could correct me on any misidentified flowers.

In the meantime, please enjoy your hike through the trails and meadows showcasing colourful flowers.

Dame's Rockets under a tree opening into a meadow behind.
Dame's Rockets under a tree opening into a meadow behind.
Unidentified, but beautiful.
Unidentified, but beautiful. | Source
Canada Anemone.
Canada Anemone. | Source
I only saw three of these trillium in all, blooming near Credit River near my home. Trillium is the provincial flower of Ontario.
I only saw three of these trillium in all, blooming near Credit River near my home. Trillium is the provincial flower of Ontario. | Source
Cow vetch.
Cow vetch. | Source
K2 leading us through dense foliage after dusk after a day of hiking to see wildflowers.
K2 leading us through dense foliage after dusk after a day of hiking to see wildflowers. | Source
Cow Vetch (moave/purple) and Oxeye Daisy (white).
Cow Vetch (moave/purple) and Oxeye Daisy (white). | Source
A meadow full of moave / purple wildflowers, mostly Dame's Rockets.
A meadow full of moave / purple wildflowers, mostly Dame's Rockets. | Source
Dame's rocket among starry false Solomon's-Seal (white). Don't pick any of these.
Dame's rocket among starry false Solomon's-Seal (white). Don't pick any of these. | Source
Canada Thistle
Canada Thistle | Source
Orange day lily is omnipresent and can be picked freely.
Orange day lily is omnipresent and can be picked freely. | Source
Oxeye daisies failed to garner K2's attention.
Oxeye daisies failed to garner K2's attention. | Source
Meadow buttercup.
Meadow buttercup. | Source
Chicory can be picked freely.
Chicory can be picked freely. | Source
Primrose.
Primrose. | Source
Purple crown-vetch can be picked freely.
Purple crown-vetch can be picked freely. | Source
Bindweed can be picked freely.
Bindweed can be picked freely. | Source
K2 leads us through a narrow trail with crown vetch blooming on our left and cow vetch blooming on our right.
K2 leads us through a narrow trail with crown vetch blooming on our left and cow vetch blooming on our right. | Source
Black-eyed Susan can be picked freely.
Black-eyed Susan can be picked freely. | Source
Black-eyed Susan in the company of Oxeye Daisy. Both flowers can be picked freely.
Black-eyed Susan in the company of Oxeye Daisy. Both flowers can be picked freely. | Source
Common milkweed. Monarch Butterflies cannot complete their life cycle without these.
Common milkweed. Monarch Butterflies cannot complete their life cycle without these. | Source
Queen Anne's Lace (wild carrot) can be picked freely.
Queen Anne's Lace (wild carrot) can be picked freely. | Source
Bull thistle.
Bull thistle. | Source
K2 looks back to reconfirm I am ready to move on after taking pictures of swamp vervain.
K2 looks back to reconfirm I am ready to move on after taking pictures of swamp vervain. | Source
Swamp vervain with Orange day lilies in the background. Lilies can be picked freely.
Swamp vervain with Orange day lilies in the background. Lilies can be picked freely. | Source
Musk Mallow (white) with bird's foot trefoil (yellow). Both of these flowers can be picked freely.
Musk Mallow (white) with bird's foot trefoil (yellow). Both of these flowers can be picked freely. | Source
Peppergrass.
Peppergrass. | Source
Bladder campion can be picked freely
Bladder campion can be picked freely | Source
Harebell on the rocks.
Harebell on the rocks. | Source
Orange Hawkweed cab be picked freely.
Orange Hawkweed cab be picked freely. | Source
Common Teasel can be picked freely.
Common Teasel can be picked freely. | Source

Map of southern Ontario and western NY

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21 comments

Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 10 months ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi Gavin (Discordzrocks),

Thank you for visiting my hub and leaving a comment about my hiking experience observing flowers.


Discordzrocks profile image

Discordzrocks 10 months ago from Austin TX

All the constant flowers and your cute dog sniffing them really brings out happeness


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 22 months ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you for visiting my beautiful world of wildflowers. You are absolutely correct about spring. Although I love winters the most for hiking, spring is a welcome change.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 22 months ago from North Texas

So many beautiful photos! I love spring when the wildflowers are profuse. A great time to get out and walk and see the wide open spaces.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you Eiddwen. I really appreciate it.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

Wonderful; I really enjoyed the words plus photos. Voting up and sharing.

Enjoy your day .

Eddy.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you Crafty.

So we have something in common - dogs and hiking. In Ontario we have black eyed susan both in the wild and in homes. It is a beautiful flower. It looks much more beautiful in the wild, because it makes wilderness look a little friendlier. I am glad that you have them in your home again.

Since you live in CT, I think we may be having many flowers in common but with different names.


CraftytotheCore profile image

CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

Beautiful photos! Your dog is adorable.

I'm in Connecticut. That Solomon's-Seal looks like honeysuckle that we have here. I go hiking a lot and do the same, look at the natural beauty everywhere.

We have black eyed susans in our yard that were originally there when I moved in. Someone stole them out of my yard. It took me 10 years to get them back to where they were. Now they are growing in a huge area again.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you very much Eiddwen. I always try to throw some basic knowledge behind natural phenomena so that we can be able to educate our next generation better.

Best regards,


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

A wonderful hub and I now look forward to so many more by you.,

Eddy.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

I also wanted to do spring and fall wildflowers. I will do the spring ones next year at the opportune time. I may do fall one this year in late September / early October.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Great wildflowers, Suhail. It was certainly a productive hike, and K2 seemed to be enjoying himself, as well.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

I forgot to address the above comments to Dr. Mark.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you Linda for reading the article and leaving a nice comment.

This is the last time you saw K2 in his summer attire. Kuvaszok breeders have advised us never to shorten his coat. He looks good in his long coat anyway :-)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Thank you for this very enjoyable look at wildflowers, Suhail. I loved looking at the photos of the flowers and of K2 and your son.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you Rebecca for paying a visit to my article. Admittedly, I also didn't know about our wildflowers till we got K2, our dog. Hiking with him has brought nature closer to us. Everything looks beautiful and a gift from the Mother Nature.

I may have identified QA lace incorrectly. My book shows me this, but then the book or I could be wrong. I will check back with some other sources again.

I will love to learn about Georgia (have been there once in the 80s. My uncle used to own a hotel there). The only other connections I have with Georgia are that it has southernmost range of my favorite Appalachian Trail and that one of my favorite music band REM comes from your state.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Oh I love those parrots, something I miss living in North America. We had lots of them in Pakistan and now they imported them into the UK and they are thriving there too.

That could be a reason for having so many flowers plus all of them have to put up a nice show from June to early October. But my concern is how are wildflowers going to cope with global warming, because that will lead to more windy conditions.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

I must say, I am quite jealous of your wild flowers. We have the black eyed susans and the ox eye daises. We call our bull thistle milkweed thistle. Did you know the seeds are used to cure liver ailments? Our QA lace looks different from yours.


DrMark1961 profile image

DrMark1961 3 years ago from The Beach of Brazil

We have lots of great birds. The other day I was walking through a field with my dogs and disturbed a flock of about 50 parrots. It is great seeing their green bodies flying.

You definitely have a lot more flowers. I am not sure why the temperate regions have so many more species--maybe it is because your summers are so short the flowers have to be special to compete.

The "share" buttons are showing today.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you Dr. Mark.for visiting my article. As you can easily see I am still playing in my niche lol.

Where you live, I am sure you have many other varieties of flowers and bird life.

I think the 'HubPages Followers' tab on right hand side of this page is the 'share' button.

Suhail


DrMark1961 profile image

DrMark1961 3 years ago from The Beach of Brazil

Great visual of K2 enjoying the flowers! I do not have these types of flowers where I live but appreciated your photos. Thanks.

(I wanted to share this but there are no "share" buttons. I saw this on another of your hubs yesterday. Do you know why)

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