Wildlife of Pakistan and North America that our dog and us would see while hiking.

Hiking in Pakistan, it is likely that K2 and us would encounter both a mongoose and a cobra snake.
Hiking in Pakistan, it is likely that K2 and us would encounter both a mongoose and a cobra snake. | Source

On seeing K2, my nephews and me, a blue jay scolded us on invading its territory, which scared a group of black capped Chickadees and common grackles on the fringe of the forest cover away. That, in turn, had an impact on a herd of deer grazing in the background and we saw them taking to heels.

A flock of geese started honking alarmingly over the lake even farther away.

Hiking about 200 meters, we saw two racoons treed up, desperately trying to hold on to thin branches, while a dozen squirrels had taken up fragile spots in the higher branches of nearby trees.

K2 and I are watching ducks taking off the river at our approaching them.
K2 and I are watching ducks taking off the river at our approaching them. | Source
Markhor is the national animal of Pakistan, but K2 and us are not likely to cross paths with these beautiful animals.
Markhor is the national animal of Pakistan, but K2 and us are not likely to cross paths with these beautiful animals. | Source

While hiking, our Kuvasz boy K2 and we routinely find how our approach creates a ripple effect in the denizens of the forests along the Bruce Trail.

A hike during one particular night became a mess when we got sprayed by a skunk. We were at a safe distance though. Still, the smell lingered on for quite a few days on the roadside tree that actually took the brunt of the spray.

K2's reaction to a coyote is what is typical of all dogs. There is something about coyotes that dogs don't like - body positioning, facial expressions, gait, what? I am not sure.

I was curious if we do the same hike in Pakistan, our country of origin, what wildlife we would be encountering during our hikes. So I decided to take a hypothetical long distance hike in that country.

Our potential encounters with the wildlife in Pakistan that occupies the same ecological niche as the wildlife of North America are produced below. Please do note that I took all the pictures of Pakistani wildlife uploaded here in 1987-90 period, that is, before the times of digital cameras and scanning equipment. All pictures taken by me were on the go. I do not build a hide. It is just hike-see-point-shoot kind of pictures. Therefore, the quality is quite amateurish. Several of these pictures have been uploaded by my wife on her website.

This cougar was having his nourishment at Grandfather Mountain Refuge near Boone, NC.
This cougar was having his nourishment at Grandfather Mountain Refuge near Boone, NC. | Source

Puma (Cougar or Mountain Lion), North America - Snow Leopard and Asiatic Leopard, Pakistan

I will not expect to hike in puma country with K2 without adequate precautionary measures for a dog is no match for this feline. Although Ontario has confirmed presence of almost 500 pumas in the province, they are chiefly found in the hilly and mountainous areas of the western North America and prey upon mule and white tailed deer, rocky mountain goats and bighorn sheep.

Leopards can be found in Margalla Hills or Galliyat region (sub-Himalayas).
Leopards can be found in Margalla Hills or Galliyat region (sub-Himalayas). | Source
K2 and I are not likely to run into a snow leopard in Pakistan.
K2 and I are not likely to run into a snow leopard in Pakistan. | Source

Asiatic leopard (such as the one shown here) is highly protected and sparsely distributed all over Pakistan in both barren and heavily forested hilly areas. Its numbers are rising. It preys upon all ungulates found either in the vicinity of or on the hills where it lives - gazelles, black buck, ibex, Himalayan goral, barking deer, etc. K2 and we could run into a leopard while hiking and neither party would be a happy camper if that happens.

Snow leopards are found in the high mountain regions of Himalayas, Karakorums, and Hindu Kush and are beyond our hiking range. They prey upon Markhor and Marco Polo sheep. K2 and us are likely to encounter this elusive cat if it is prowling in the lower valleys on or near a trail where we are hiking.

A male chinkara gazelle. Gazelles can be seen in Kirthar Range National Park near Karachi.
A male chinkara gazelle. Gazelles can be seen in Kirthar Range National Park near Karachi. | Source

Pronghorn, USA – Chinkara Gazelle, Pakistan

Shepherds and their livestock guardian dogs routinely see Pronghorns while grazing their charges near the northern rocky mountains of the USA. Pronghorns were once a prey of what was American cheetah. The cheetah went extinct, but pronghorn survived and can be observed in the open grasslands of western USA, where their population continues to be healthy.

Chinkara gazelles are the fastest land animal species of Pakistan. They were once preyed upon by Asiatic Cheetah that went extinct in Pakistan in early 1900s.

This doe was feeding its fawn at roadside of Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina.
This doe was feeding its fawn at roadside of Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina. | Source

White Tailed Deer, North America - Wild Boars, Pakistan

K2 and I love to watch white tailed deer in our neighbourhood during our long distance hikes. Compared to this, my experience with wild boars is that of going to organize hunts in agricultural areas of the Punjab province of Pakistan, where I usually played a traitor, driving them away from hunting parties.

K2 and us would run into wild boars from plantations in the planes to the woodlands of sub-Himalayas.
K2 and us would run into wild boars from plantations in the planes to the woodlands of sub-Himalayas. | Source

In the eastern USA and Canada, white tailed deer are generally loved for their looks. On the other hand, although piglets look cute to many, wild boars are hated in Pakistan due to the religious reasons and due to their damaging the crops.

Proliferation of deer, as people are generally averse to cull their population, has resulted in over grazed and over browsed forests. On the other hand, wild boars reproduce rapidly.

There are many commonalities too. Both inhabit forests, hills, and open woodlands. Also, environmentally, both of them have become nuisance species.

Mule Deer, North America – Black Buck, Hog Deer and Barking Deer, Pakistan

If and when I hike with K2 and other dogs near the northern Rockies, our chances of seeing mule deer are very high. Mule deer are primarily browsers on woody vegetation and eat relatively little grass. They readily adapt to agricultural products and landscape plantings.

I took this picture, the most stolen on the net, of a barking deer at Margalla Hills National Park (1988).
I took this picture, the most stolen on the net, of a barking deer at Margalla Hills National Park (1988). | Source

Black buck has been reintroduced in Pakistan and is flourishing.

Hog deer is becoming increasingly rare in Pakistan, because of the destruction of its habitat – riverine forests.

Barking deer population may survive in Margalla Hills National Park, where I took picture of this one. Sind Province’s Wildlife Management Board is actively involved in breeding of these beautiful ungulates in the country.

This mama gator was angry.
This mama gator was angry. | Source

American Alligator, USA – Mugger or Marsh Crocodile, Pakistan

We were lucky enough to airboat at Lake Tohopekaliga near Orlando and be able to take a picture of this mama alligator protecting her 40 off springs. Alligators are top predators, found in the marshes from Texas to Florida.

I will be very careful letting K2 get close to water bodies inhabited by American alligator or by marsh or mugger crocodiles.shown here.
I will be very careful letting K2 get close to water bodies inhabited by American alligator or by marsh or mugger crocodiles.shown here. | Source

Mainly a freshwater species, the mugger crocodile is found in lakes, rivers and marshes of southern Pakistan. Being a large carnivorous reptile, the mugger crocodile eats fish, other reptiles and small mammals. While we would encounter a crocodile basking in the sun when we hike along any lake in southern Sind province, taking K2 and other dogs close to their habitat is a definite ‘No’ for me.

Racoon, North America - Rhesus Macaque, feral cats, Crows and Kites, Pakistan

K2 likes to chase racoons and tree them. Racoons are omnivorous animals that usually eat vertebrates, invertebrates and plant matter. They will raid your garbage cans and get into bird nests to eat eggs and nestlings.

A male and a female with baby rhesus macaques in Galliyat region. K2 may not as easily tree them as he does a raccoon.
A male and a female with baby rhesus macaques in Galliyat region. K2 may not as easily tree them as he does a raccoon. | Source

In Pakistan, this niche is taken up by a number of animals. In the wild, it would be Rhesus Macaque monkey flourishing in the lower Himalayan hills.

In the populated areas, feral cats feed from dumpsters in the cities, towns and settlements. Both monkeys and cats would take to trees if they see K2.

Omnivorous crows and carrion eating black kites feed on garbage and road kills and the former are specialists in raiding bird nests.

Long Tailed Weasel, North America – Indian Grey Mongoose, Pakistan

Long Tailed Weasel’s primary prey consists of mice, rats, squirrels, chipmunks, shrews, moles and rabbits. Occasionally, it may eat small birds, bird eggs, reptiles, amphibians, fish, earthworms and some insects.

A mongoose and a cobra in a friendly encounter.
A mongoose and a cobra in a friendly encounter. | Source

Its equal in Pakistan is the mongoose. My parents who kept a mini farm in the country side had to protect their chicken coops from marauding mongooses, whose primary diet consists of small snakes, frogs, birds, etc. However, mongooses are best known for their ability to fight with and kill highly venomous cobra snakes.

This hike-see-point-shoot picture doesn't do justice to this beautiful bird.
This hike-see-point-shoot picture doesn't do justice to this beautiful bird. | Source

Wild Turkey, North America - Peacock, Pakistan

K2 and us ran into wild turkeys in Rockwood Conservation Area. In Pakistan, there is a strong possibility of our running into peacocks (peahens) while hiking in Tharparker region in southeastern Sind province or in the salt planes of the Punjab province.

My favorite bird from Pakistan, digs bugs out of ground just like American Robin.
My favorite bird from Pakistan, digs bugs out of ground just like American Robin. | Source

American Robin, North America - Hoopoe, Pakistan

Arrival of Robins in our neighbourhood is one of the first indicators that spring has arrived. They harass K2 during our hike, landing right in front of us and hopping to incite K2 in chasing them. When K2 gets closer, they fly off only to land a few hundred meters ahead of us.

Hoopoe is a colourful bird notable for its distinctive 'crown' of feathers.Its diet is mostly composed of insects, although small reptiles, frogs and plant matter such as seeds and berries are sometimes taken as well.

Red-Winged Blackbirds, North America – White-Cheeked Bulbul, Pakistan

Come spring, K2 and I encounter red-winged blackbirds near tall grasses adjacent to water bodies and I am sure lots of others may be finding them all over northern USA and Canada.

White cheeked bulbul (1988).
White cheeked bulbul (1988). | Source

White cheeked bulbul, that I took a snapshot of, can be observed near water bodies over tall grasses near lakes, marshes, swamps and smaller water bodies all over Pakistan.

I used to get the same feeling after seeing a bulbul as I do after seeing blackbird.

I took this picture of sandhill cranes at Lake Tohopekaliga near Orlando..
I took this picture of sandhill cranes at Lake Tohopekaliga near Orlando.. | Source

Sandhill Cranes, USA – Common Crane, Pakistan

Both these cranes are among 4 subspecies of cranes that are not endangered.

I am sure I will see a pair of sandhill cranes when hiking with K2 along the banks of lakes in southern USA. Sandhill cranes have their match in Demoiselle cranes of Pakistan.

Unfortunately, I saw many of them in Pakistan, I was unable to take pictures of Demoiselle cranes.
Unfortunately, I saw many of them in Pakistan, I was unable to take pictures of Demoiselle cranes. | Source

The Demoiselle crane lives in a variety of different environments, including desert areas and numerous types of grasslands (flooded, mountain, temperate and tropical grassland) which are often within a few hundred metres of streams or lakes. K2 and us would see them all over the wetlands of Pakistan.

Bald eagle at Lake Osceola near Orlando
Bald eagle at Lake Osceola near Orlando | Source

Bald Eagle, North America - Pallas’ Sea Eagle, Pakistan

While hiking with K2, I would certainly be seeing a bald eagle catching a fish over a lake all over the USA and Canada. I took this picture of one while it rested on a tree at Lake Osceola near Orlando, Florida.

K2 and we would enjoy Palla's fish eagle catching a fish in a Pakistani lake as much as we would a bald eagle.
K2 and we would enjoy Palla's fish eagle catching a fish in a Pakistani lake as much as we would a bald eagle. | Source

The status of Pallas’ fishing or sea eagle, unlike bald eagle, is ‘Vulnerable’. Like bald eagle, its diet consists primarily of large freshwater fish. However, they also regularly predate water birds.

I took this picture of great blue heron at Lake Oneonta near Pittsfield, Berkshires.
I took this picture of great blue heron at Lake Oneonta near Pittsfield, Berkshires. | Source

Great Blue Heron, North America – Grey Egret, Pakistan

Great blue heron, as our popular hubber Aviannovice correctly suggests, is a graceful bird that K2 and us can easily observe while hiking along lakes and rivers of the USA.

A grey egret or grey heron is as elegant as a blue heron.
A grey egret or grey heron is as elegant as a blue heron. | Source

In Pakistan, Grey Egret will evoke the same feelings. It feeds in shallow water, catching fish, frogs, and insects with its long bill. It will also take small mammals and reptiles. It will often wait motionless for prey, or slowly stalk its victim.

Source

Chickadee, North America - Purple sunbird, Pakistan

I took this picture of a black capped Chickadee as it collected seeds in the fall season. K2 and us often see these birds even in winters as more and more birders are putting seeds on the trees in the conservation areas. Some of these birds will hop on to our hand to pick seeds.

A female purple sunbird on an electric pole.
A female purple sunbird on an electric pole. | Source

While sunbirds would not come close to us, their singing for a mate can easily attract anybody to them. They like perching on power lines and poles.

Blue jay at Grandfather Mountain near Boone, NC (2009)
Blue jay at Grandfather Mountain near Boone, NC (2009) | Source

Blue Jay, North America – Koel Cuckoo Bird, Pakistan

During our hikes, K2 gets visibly inquisitive about noisy blue jays, which are rarely detectable in the green leaves of the trees.

Female Koel.
Female Koel. | Source

Blue jays are hardly seen and they are characterized by their irritating gull like alarm call. Similarly, Koels are hardly seen, but are characterized by a cooing call that Urdu literature claims as ‘romantic’. K2 would be able to hear a koel coo just like he can a blue jay scolding, but seeing the two are equally difficult.

Bonus Matches

This leaves me with the nuisance of our North American Skunks and Canada Geese.

Common crow is an intelligent bird. There are reasons for me to put it against a skunk.
Common crow is an intelligent bird. There are reasons for me to put it against a skunk.

Skunks

We are always scared of spring and fall seasons when the skunks in our neighbourhood become very active. I dread their spray. If K2 or one of us gets directly sprayed by a skunk, we would have had it. There is no animal of Pakistan that I can think of that comes close to the niche occupied by skunk, but hey wait a minute. There is one that comes to my mind – common crow. While it can’t spray you when harassed, it knows how to get even. It will drop its poop on you.

The odour of skunk’s spray won’t go for days, but imagine the embarrassment caused by carrying that terrible crow poop on your head and shoulder for all the passersby to see and be amused at the cost of your self-esteem. And believe you me it has its nasty odour too. Furthermore, you cannot even clean it without water for more you try to wipe it out using a dry tissue, more embarrassingly it spreads. Your acquaintances will empathize with you on learning about skunk spray, but they will heartily laugh at you on knowing about crow poop.

On seeing K2 and us approaching, this gander  led its family into lake of the Island Lake Conservation Area near Dufferin, Ontario.
On seeing K2 and us approaching, this gander led its family into lake of the Island Lake Conservation Area near Dufferin, Ontario. | Source

Canada Geese

Canada geese have become a nuisance all over the USA and Canada. Their population is bursting at seems. They dump at least 1,360 kg of droppings along the stretch of shoreline. According to experts, the loose-boweled birds which poop-ulate the Lake Ontario waterfront unload their contents an estimated 10 times each hour.

The only thing cute about Canada geese is their goslings following the adults.

I have no clue how would these feral or stray dogs behave if they see K2 and us hiking close by them.
I have no clue how would these feral or stray dogs behave if they see K2 and us hiking close by them. | Source

The only animals that come close to Canadian geese are feral dogs, i.e., only in terms of their residency and nuisance value. You will find them occupying corners of all vacant pieces of lands and parks, in the water or under trees trying to take shelter from sweltering heat, prowling about for carrion and throw-away crumbs of bread, travelling in packs, and even uttering alarm barks at strangers.

The only thing cute about feral dogs is a litter of puppies for they reach out to you just like pet dogs and you almost always fall in love with them.

The Chiltan Wild Goat is endemic to Pakistan and is listed as critically endangered in the IUCN Red Data book.
The Chiltan Wild Goat is endemic to Pakistan and is listed as critically endangered in the IUCN Red Data book. | Source
Chukar is the national bird of Pakistan. K2 and us would not be able to observe them while hiking there.
Chukar is the national bird of Pakistan. K2 and us would not be able to observe them while hiking there. | Source

Other convergent niche species that I don't have my pictures for:

Grey wolf, North America - Grey wolf (Tibetan wolf), Pakistan

Coyote, North America - Wild: Grey wolf (Indian wolf), Sub-urban: jackal, mongoose, Pakistan

Bobcat, North America - Caracal, fishing cat, sand cat, and desert cat, Pakistan

Grizzly bear, North America - Brown bear, Pakisan

Black bear, North America - Himalayan black bear, Pakistan

Rocky mountain goat, North America - Markhor, Himalyan goral, Chiltan Wild Goat, Pakistan

Bighorn sheep, North America - Sind Ibex, Punjab and Balochistan Urial, Marco Polo sheep, Pakistan

Bison, North America - Indian Rhino (under captive breeding program), Pakistan

Elk, North America - Neel gaye, Pakistan

More by this Author


Comments 18 comments

Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 months ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi FlourishAnyway,

Thank you for reading my hub that I need to update really quickly.

Believe you me, I can relate and that is why I don't visit under developed countries, even though I hail from one. If I visit it is only for adventure traveling to specific remote spots.

K2 and I ran into a skunk last night and the bugger didn't yield walking rights to us. We had to make a detour to reach the desired spot :-)

Regards,


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 months ago from USA

It would break my heart to see the feral cats and dogs. I have spent nearly 15 years here in the states (and a lot of money) spaying and neutering, vaccinating, and feeding feral and stray cats and helping poor people fix their animals so they don't become strays and ferals. For this reason, I have to watch where I vacation. The visions of poverty and animals in desperate situations consume me and I cannot concentrate on anything else. Your skunk and crow stories were humorous. One of my pet cats a long time ago was sprayed and it took quite awhile for it the smell to neutralize. I have regularly seen alligators at my aunt's home and see raccoons and others on my property. Beautiful, entertaining hub.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 14 months ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thanks, Stella. Hiking with my dog for the rest of my life is around the corner, but like you, I have honed my skills visiting our national, state, and provincial parks in the USA and Canada.

Thank you for visiting.


ladyguitarpicker profile image

ladyguitarpicker 14 months ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Hi Suhail, I love your hub and the photos are beautiful. I think the Pakistan snow leopard is the most beautiful animal. I wish I could hike and see these animals. There is nothing like taking your dog with you. Sharing


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi FlourishAway,

Yes, one of my dream activity is to be able to hike with my dog in lands near and far. I read lots of hiking and trekking adventures and I believe that taking our dogs along on our adventures is just a natural extension of the strategic partnership. Thanks for your comments.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

I enjoyed your journey as well as the photos and descriptions of the animals, near and far. The photo of the feral dogs is sad. Nice hub. Voted up and more.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Thank you travmaj.

I let my imagination run wild on this one lol.


travmaj profile image

travmaj 3 years ago from australia

what a lovely hub - and what beautiful photos - I enjoyed this journey and the birds and animals, thank you.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Adrienne,

Thank you very much for appreciating my imaginary walk to see real animals. This is why I always take interest in hubs on various dog breeds. I always wanted to have a team of dogs and me hiking long distances. I hope to get there some day soon.


alexadry profile image

alexadry 3 years ago from USA

I really enjoyed reading this and the lovely pictures you have posted. Makes me want to hop on a plane and travel!


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi Michelle,

Thank you very much indeed for the compliments. I will pass your hello to K2 now :-)


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi Fuzail,

Among the three of us brothers, you are the most experienced in extreme adventures, including para gliding, para shoot jumping, forest, mountain and desert survival courses, so on and so forth. You just have to let your imagination chalk out the whole scenario for you. Of course, you are a valuable member of this hiking trip lol.


midget38 profile image

midget38 3 years ago from Singapore

Beautiful pictures, Suhail. And Pakistan does have wonderful wildlife to experience once conditions get better. Thanks for sharing, and once again, please say hi to K2 for me!


Fuzail Z. Ahmad 3 years ago

Suhail, I am not so sure if I was part of your hypothetical wildlife tour of Pakistan with K2. Was i? Nonetheless, we will make it together in 2013. Excellent piece this was. Thanks for sharing it with all of us.


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

travel_man,

Wait for conditions to improve in Pakistan. According to the Lonely Planet website, Pakistan is the next big thing in international tourism.

Btw, now I am waiting for you to write something about wildlife of Philippines :-)


Suhail and my dog profile image

Suhail and my dog 3 years ago from Mississauga, ON Author

Hi Deb,

That wasn't the complete list. I only included those that I thought my dog and I would see during our hypothetical hiking and trekking excursions in Pakistan.

Btw, today, during my hike with K2, I visited our neighbourhood version of Boomer Lake and I noticed so many birds and waterfowl have returned that it was non-stop chirrups, calls, songs leading to a full chorus. K2 and I enjoyed our walk and I thanked your hubs on Boomer Lake for the awareness.

Both of us did miss our snow though for it has now melted, except for few patches here and there.


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 3 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

Good job! I've never been to Pakistan but with your travelogue, I will never be a stranger to that unfamiliar terrain.

Voted up and shared!


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Great work, Suhail! I enjoyed seeing the birds and animals of Pakistan through your eyes. Perhaps one day I can get to the area to see them for myself.

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