Witch Trials of Salem Village - Not Quite

When the Salem Witch Trials are brought up, people naturally think of Salem, Massachusetts. They actively proclaim themselves the "witch city" and the famous, or infamous to some, silhouette of a pointy-hatted witch astride a broom is seen everywhere. And wait until October. The entire month is dedicated to Halloween, building and building until it reaches a crescendo on the 31st when streets are blocked off and extra members of Salem's finest are put on patrol to keep up with the "witchy" revelry.

In Salem one can go see the Salem Witch Museum, the Wax Museum of Witches & Seafarers, the Witch History Museum, or become part of the dramatic recreations of the trials at the Witch Dungeon or the Cry Innocent where the visitors are the jury. The only building however with direct ties to the hysteria of 1692 is Judge Jonathan Corwin's home called the Witch House. But Salem has a lot to offer. There are spell parlors, Count Orlock's Nightmare Gallery, the Hocus Pocus tours, and legend after legend of hauntings on street corners, up in the cemeteries, and even one story of the hanging tree that some can point out to you while others who've researched it simply cannot prove still stands after over 300 years.

But Salem is not the center of the history of the witch hysteria. Salem, as it stands today is not the Salem Village of the late 1600's. The land that the city sits on was called Salem Town. Villagers moved a little bit north to the farmlands known as Danvers Highlands. Petitioning for independance, they became known as Salem Village in 1672 with the Reverand Samuel Parris being the voice of the church in the parish. It was here that the first accusations took place with Rev. Parris's own 9-year old daughter and 12-year old niece being the first of the girls to fall into fits. When the doctor found nothing physically wrong with the girls, he cried witchcraft and the girls readily agreed. They pointed their fingers at three women of the parish: Sarah Osburn, Sarah Good, and Parris's slave, Tituba. No member of the commuity was safe from being accused. One example of upstanding members of the parish being accused is the story of Rebecca Nurse whose home, a fair sized amount of her family's land, and the famiiy cemetery still remain in the shadow of Hathorne Hill where the Danvers State Insane Asylum sits.

It is Danvers that has deliberately taken a back seat to Salem in profiting from the witch trials. At 176 Hobart Street in Danvers, you'll find the Salem Village Witchcraft Victims' Memorial. It is sitting beside the street in front of a ball field. Parking is on the street. As is best, the memorial is simple but powerful. There are two parts. Standing vertical is a three-panel granite wall that has the 17th century spelling of the names of the 24 men and women and one child who died as a result of the witch hysteria. The towns where these victim's were originally from are listed which includes Salem Village, Salem Farmes (Peabody), Salem, Andover, Billerica, Amesbury, Reading, Topsfield, Marblehead and Rowley.

In front of the panels is a granite sarcophagus on which is a slanted, granite Bible box with a book laying open on it. The box itself is carved with several different rosettes typical of the designs found on gravestones all around New England. The open book is inscribed in 17th century typeface with, "THE BOOK OF LIFE." Puritans accused of being practicing witchcraft were said to have signed the "devil's book." But all refused to admit to this hoping that, even if they were put to death, God would know of their innocence and their names would be found in His Book of LIfe. Also on the sarcophagus are a set of large-scale reproduction shackles.

It is a powerful memorial to the victim's of fear, ignorance, avarice, and greed. The Rebecca Nurse homestead is a beautiful, peaceful museum to tour. There are links below to Salem and its many attractions, to the Memorial, and to the Rebecca Nurse Homestead.

Salem Village Witchcraft Victims' Memorial
Salem Village Witchcraft Victims' Memorial

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Comments 14 comments

JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 7 years ago from Central Oklahoma

My earliest ancestors settled on Marblehead Neck, and were arrested as accomplices to the burglary of the elder Judge Corwin's home (Jonathan's father, not him). Digging deeper, I'm convinced it wasn't a robbery at all, only servants getting the pay owed them.  Fast forward a few years, and the daughter-in-law who would become  my ancestress was a character witness for a woman accused of witchcraft, who thankfully was not found guilty.  My ancestress was quite outspoken for a woman of her time, so I'm ever amazed that *she* wasn't accused too!

At any rate, it irritates me no end that a huge misuse of power causing the deaths of innocent women (and men) has been commercialized into a tourist attraction and Halloween entertainment. 

I wasn't aware till now of the Witchcraft Memorial in Danvers.  What a beautiful and fitting monument to those whose lives were ruined by mere rumor.  


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 7 years ago from West Virginia

Nice information and a great hub! The truth does come out, doesn't it.


womanNshadows profile image

womanNshadows 7 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

such a fascinating history and to learn that you have an ancestress who was a strong, verbal woman must have brought you a smile. Halloween is huge in Salem and though they try to offer up the history, it does get lost in the revelry with parades, parties, and costumes.

the Witchcraft Memorial is not noted in any tourist brochures. it is well kept and, as it was meant to, makes the visitor feel humble for what these defenseless women and men endured. it is a powerfully simple memorial and worth the time to find it.


John Z profile image

John Z 7 years ago from Midwest

Fascinating hub! Thanks!


womanNshadows profile image

womanNshadows 7 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

thank you.


bizymomof3 profile image

bizymomof3 7 years ago from New York City

Excellent hub, I enjoyed it very much. Thanks for attaching the pictures, it is a very powerful memorial.


womanNshadows profile image

womanNshadows 7 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

thank you and you're welcome.


lisa 6 years ago

this is stupid


womanNshadows profile image

womanNshadows 6 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

lisa, what part is stupid, the reporting of historical fact, the idea of the memorial itself, the photos, or just everything in general?


unkown 4 years ago

i liked the pictures and the info


Jim 4 years ago

Great article. People are often confused when I tell them the Salem witchcraft trials happened in what is now Danvers. I used to live in Salem. It's a beautiful town with great maritime history, the House of The Seven Gables, the wonderful Peabody Essex Museum, good restaurants, and many other nice places to go. I now avoid Salem in October, at least on week-ends, and Halloween. I wish all the tourists visiting for the witchcraft history could be given a copy of this article..


Jim 4 years ago

Great article. People are often confused when I tell them the Salem witchcraft trials happened in what is now Danvers. I used to live in Salem. It's a beautiful town with great maritime history, the House of The Seven Gables, the wonderful Peabody Essex Museum, good restaurants, and many other nice places to go. I now avoid Salem in October, at least on week-ends, and Halloween. I wish all the tourists visiting for the witchcraft history could be given a copy of this article..


Christopher Spencer 3 years ago

Does anybody have any idea what the rosettes beneath the "BOOK OF LIFE"on the Salem Witch Memorial might represent or symbolize, or are they purely stylistic?


womanNshadows profile image

womanNshadows 3 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

during my research, i have not found any particular meaning to the rosettes. if anyone does, please let us know.

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