A walk through a town - Diriamba, Nicaragua

Rate My Photos

5 out of 5 stars from 3 ratings of Photos

Pictures from Diriamba, Nicaragua

  An old man and his dog on the sidewalk of Diriamba, Nicaragua
An old man and his dog on the sidewalk of Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
 Old man on the streets of Diriamba, Nicaragua
Old man on the streets of Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  The paint can shaker of the band on the street. Diriamba, Nicaragua
The paint can shaker of the band on the street. Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  Bongo player in street band Diriamba, Nicaragua
Bongo player in street band Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  Horse drawn cart delivering vegetables in Diriamba, Nicaragua
Horse drawn cart delivering vegetables in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  Home in Diriamba, Nicaragua
Home in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  Abandoned building in Diriamba, Nicaragua
Abandoned building in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  The main church in Diriambga, Nicaragua
The main church in Diriambga, Nicaragua | Source
 Government building protected by bars in Diriamba, Nicaragua
Government building protected by bars in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  A different design for windows and bars in Diriamba, Nicaragua
A different design for windows and bars in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source
  Abandoned building in Diriamba, Nicaragua
Abandoned building in Diriamba, Nicaragua | Source

Introduction to Diriamba, Nicaragua

Nicaragua's rough around the edges. Heck, it's rough in the middle. Horses and cows pull carts all throughout the country. It's the only country in Central America that does not have a paved road going to the eastern side of the country. Though it does have a port on the Atlantic Ocean.

One of the poorest countries in Central America, the people still try to live the best way they can. Nicaragua and Honduras seem to compete for that spot. Both have friendly people who are trying to get out of their slumber.

Diriamba kind of the town that traffic has to pass through. If you want to go from Managua to the beach in San Jan del Sur, you're going to pass through the town. If your a trucker following the PanAmerican highway, your going to pass through the town

The Start of My Walk In Diriamba, Nicaragua

I started my walk off the main drag of Diriamba - the Pan-American Highway. The further you get away from the main drag, the more you see how regular people live. It's somewhat of a "suburb" of Managua. In reality, it's a town that just kind of survives. It's east of Casares, which used to be a place that old dictators liked to visit. To the south is the town of San Jaun del Sur, the most popular tourist spot in Nicaragua.

The first person I ran into was an old man on the street. He wasn't begging, he was just standing on the sidewalk with his dog. He seemed content with life, happy that he had a day outside with his dog. As you can tell from the second picture, he seemed satisfied with his spot in life.

If you ever photograph people, it is always polite to ask ahead of time if it's OK. He gave me his permission. After I took the photograph, I showed it to him through the viewer. He thought it was the greatest thing, and thanked me for taking his picture. Out of respect, I gave him 5 cordobas (about .25 cents). Again, he thanked me over and over for stopping and sharing with him. How can one be so poor yet still seem so happy?

A mystery to me.

The next sequence of photographs is of a street band that was practicing on this Sunday afternoon walk of mine. A marimba, bongo and a guy shaking a paint can to the beat of the music. A few guys hanging around them enjoying a sunny afternoon in the city.

Pleasant group of fellows, despite what the bongo guy looks like. Friendly to the point of trying to communicate with a silly gringo who goes traveling in Central America without learning Spanish first.

The group's in the shade and I could not get a good shot of the guy playing the marimba. Both the fellow playing the bongos and the guy shaking the can sat in the shade, and the background allowed me to take some decent photographs.

In all, I would say there were 10 guys on the sidewalk. 3 in the "band" and the others listening and giving advice on how to improve the music. Some things never change - offering advice whether it's wanted or not seems a worldwide, favourite pastime. Central America is no different. Advice is offered readily, if it's asked for or not.

If you look closely at the bongo and the clothes that these gentlemen are wearing, you can see that the items have seen better times. They have learned to do with what they have. When was the last time you saw a guy shaking a paint can as part of a musical group?

Gotta do what you gotta do!

A horse-drawn cart delivering vegetables in Diriamba, Nicaragua. Not an unusual sight. The carts are either drawn by horses or pushed/pulled by humans. Like most people, if they can get an animal to do the work, it is preferable.

You'll see horses in all the towns of Nicaragua, Small towns use them more than the big towns. But, even in Managua, the capital of the country, horses pull carts that carry vegetables, garbage or dirt. Whatever needs moving, horses and cows are a commonly used in Nicaragua.

All through Central America you will see windows with bars, doors with bars and even garage door entrances will have bars. This is definitely set up to keep robbers out of the homes and offices. No one's kidding anyone - there are thieves and they will steal what is not protected.

There are plenty of abandoned houses and office buildings in Nicaragua. Remember that less than 20 years ago, the country was in the middle of a civil war.

The yellow house is one of the better homes in Diriamba. Even so, you can still see the paint peeling off the mortar on the sides of the building.

Nothing seems easily maintainable in Nicaragua.

Paint is peeling or fading.

Wood is rotting and breaking when it's used in a house or office building.

The next picture is that of an old abandoned building in the town.

Still see the bars?

This keeps out the squatters. People will take over anything unless you keep them out. Once squatters get a foot hold on a piece of property, it involves a legal battle to get them off the property.

It is just as easy to give them a bit of money after they move off the property. Hence the reason squatters squat on land and in abandoned buildings.

The main church of the town appears in the next picture. I thought a nice photograph of the church with a great sky in the background.

The next photograph is that of a government office building. Even with guards, the bars and heavy garage door are normal. It is to make sure that no one enters when the building's unoccupied.

I've never had a problem with any civilians. I guess the locals know better than I, the dangers that are on the streets all the time.

The locals try to give some decoration to the bars and heavy-duty garage entrances. As seen in the next photograph, there was some thought given on the way the windows and bars are used.

Not pretty, but neither unsightly as just slapping up windows and bars as needed.

It was a nice day for a walk. Sunday afternoon, very few cars or foot traffic.

Nice people met and some interesting buildings to look at.

I hope the photographs give you an idea of the relaxed way of life here in Nicaragua.

Danger is kept at bay by fortification of buildings and homes.

This allows people to let their guard down a bit to relax, which is always good!


A markerdiriamba, nicargaua -
Diriamba, Nicaragua
[get directions]

Nicaraguas earn less than $180 per month

Nicaragua El Porvenir Organic Direct Trade, Whole Bean, Fresh Roasted Coffee LLC. (5 lb.)
Nicaragua El Porvenir Organic Direct Trade, Whole Bean, Fresh Roasted Coffee LLC. (5 lb.)

Believe or not, Nicaragua's got some great coffee.

Grown in the northern part of the country in the hills are a town called Somoto.

Definitely worth a try!

 

More by this Author


Comments 41 comments

snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 5 years ago from Canada

Enjoyed your rich colorful photos claptona. Really great with the color. Is there a secret to achieving this, aside from a good eye? Any info on the camera, film, lense? I'm just being nosey. These are the first photos I've seen out of Nicaragua in a long while. These images paint it as somewhat peaceful, yet forgotten. I enjoyed your story explaining the photos. Wise to ask permission and great that everyone was so willing to have you there. Thank you so much for sharing these. Regards, snakeslane


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 5 years ago from Nepal

It is always fun to know about another culture and country. Thanks for sharing these pictures and information here.


Carol Ann 5 years ago

Thanks for the photos - I really enjoyed seeing them. I haven't been to Nicaragua in 10 years and your pictures bring back some good memories. Thanks.

Carol Ann

http://writefortravel.com


WannaB Writer profile image

WannaB Writer 5 years ago from Templeton, CA

This was a great photo essay, capturing the spirit of the street and the people in it on this sunny way. Thanks for sharing it.


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 5 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Enjoyed my walk with you but wouldn't do it on my own. THe photos are super. That one big abandoned building looked interesting enough to become someone's castle if only if wasn't in Nicaragua. I think the people like that old man and his dog are happy because that's the way life is and there is no stress to make it any better. Even the dog rolling around appeared OK and content. And if you get a little down there's the street bands to lift you up. Fascinating.


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Vinaya,

Thanks for taking the time to read the post and to add a comment, greatly appreciated.

Enjoyed your views on your home country, Nepal. Keep up the good work there.

To your continued success!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Vinaya,

Thanks for taking the time to read the post and to add a comment, greatly appreciated.

Enjoyed your views on your home country, Nepal. Keep up the good work there.

To your continued success!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Carol Ann,

Welcome to Hub Pages!

Thanks so much for taking the time to read the post. Your comment is very nice.

Hope to see you again, and soon!

Play nice and travel safely!

Cheers,

John D. WIlson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi WannaB,

Thank you so much for stopping by and viewing the pics and the story behind them. It's greatly appreciate.

Your compliment is very nice, and it is the reason I take and post pictures.

To your continued success!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Gypsy

Yes, I can understand about not wanting to walk alone - not the "best" neighborhood in the world.

It is strange, as I have been into some areas that seemed "dangerous" but have never had any problem with local people.

Really glad that you enjoyed the post - it is for that type of comment that motivates me to do what I do.

Thanks again for your compliments and I'm really happy that you enjoyed the post.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Gar 5 years ago

Enjoyed this little stroll. I really could hear the band. :-)


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hey Gar,

Thanks for the comment, greatly appreciated.

When do you close on your house to start your adventure?

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Snakeslane,

Thanks for your wonderful comment, made my day it did!

The camera is an Olympus E-420, lens is a Olympus 40-150mm f/4.0-5.6 ED

It's an SRL digital camera, so no film.

Tips that have worked for me.

1) The closer to the subject the better

2) I try to make sure the sun is behind me

3) I try not to put the subject into the center of the picture. To the right or left of center is always better.

4) I usually let the camera automatically focus - I just do not have the patience to manually try to get it exact.

5) I try to take 4 to 7 shots of the same thing and pick out the one that is the best of the bunch.

Hope that helps you.

I truly appreciate the questions, as it means that I just might be doing something right when taking pics! :o)

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


silverboom 5 years ago

nicely done, John. Good write-up & perspective, the selection of good shots supports the writing well - or I should say, vice versa. This kind of "travelogue" or "day in the life" kind of writing seems to suit you. And you have the basics down on your photography - likely not as hard as you thought. Keep working on composition, play around a bit with lighting, and you'll continue to improve. When confronted with shadows like that, use the flash - or switch your dial setting to "landscape" and it will adjust better for the poor lighting.

Keep up the good work.


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Silverboom,

Thanks much for taking the time to read the post and leave your comments.

Your suggestions are welcome, I always need to improve - progress rather than perfection!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Doug Dawson (@earthswanderer) 5 years ago

Nice pictures John, love the one of the old man! If only we could all be so content! Thanks for sharing and enlightening us to the ways of Nicaragua. Stay safe and best wishesA,

Doug


mary615 profile image

mary615 5 years ago from Florida

This Hub is the reason I love to follow a Hubber who lives in a foreign country from mine. I really learn a lot. I really enjoyed this walk with you. Hope to see more of these "walks". I voted you Up, etc.etc.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 5 years ago from United States

I think this is a very interesting hub. The pictures are very interesting and seeing someone so happy who is so poor is refreshing. I enjoyed taking this walk with you.


Credence2 profile image

Credence2 5 years ago from Florida (Space Coast)

The fact that people seem so content being poor makes we wonder about our focus in North America. These are great photos/ The missus and I have considered ex-pat pensionado status in Central America. We have a lot of research to do but your articles begin to paint a picture. Do you know where all North American ex-pats live in Nicaragua? Are they all living behind walled compounds? Is that hard line of have verses have nots create any resentment among the populace? Great Article, John... Cred2


SwiftFamily profile image

SwiftFamily 5 years ago from Rayle, GA

beautiful and authentic! thank you for sharing!


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Doug,

Glad to see you wander over here! That's great - as if you do not have enough places to write for, right?

Thanks for the compliment, always appreciated!

Play nice and travel safely, my friend.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Sueswan 5 years ago

Hi John,

Thank you for taking us on your walk through Diriamba.

Love your pictures.

I look forward to reading more of your hubs.

Voted up and awesome.


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Mary,

Thanks so much for the vote up and the comment, that is really great.

Glad to hear you enjoyed the Hub, makes me want to put up more with different pics!

Safe holidays to you and yours!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Sueswan,

By yimminnee, with these votes up I'm about ready to do cartwheels through the streets of Matagalpa! Thanks.

Glad to hear you enjoyed the Hub.

Thanks for the compliments on the photos too. Means I am getting better at the pics!

The best of the holiday season to you and yours.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Swiftfamily,

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on the Hub, 'tis greatly appreciated.

Play nice and travel safely, Swiftfamily.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Cred2,

Thanks for the compliments on the pics.

Ex-pats in Nicaragua seem to be located mostly in Granada, a city on Lake Nicaragua.

As far as the "walled compound" goes - the locals have a reason for setting up the walls and barbed wire around their homes. Expats who listed to the locals, do the same thing.

No, money does not seem to automatically put you in a "I'm better than you" frame of mind. Rich and poor mingle quite a lot, with no disrespect from the rich to the poor or vice versa.

Lots of reason to think along those lines of moving to Central America - retiring here.

It's cheaper than the states, it's got plenty of opportunity for small businesses, there are incentives in most countries for free importation of goods if you are moving here.

Come to think of it - I'm going to write a blog about the advantages/disadvantages of moving to Central America!

Thanks Cred2 for the idea!

To your continued success!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Pamela,

Thanks for the compliment on the Hub and the pictures, greatly appreciated!

I think the poor fellow has the right concept - "Be content no matter the situation".

I've received quite a few compliments on that particular picture.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Credence2 profile image

Credence2 5 years ago from Florida (Space Coast)

Hey thanks, John, I looking forward to reading it. With your experience you might compare and contrast if you can between a place like Nicaragua and maybe Panama or Equador. I would learn a great deal, thanks, I can't wait

Cred2


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Cred2.,

Could be a series of Hubs!

Maybe an ebook!

Again, thanks for the question and idea!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


jill of alltrades profile image

jill of alltrades 5 years ago from Philippines

I've never been to Nicaragua so I enjoyed this walk with you! You take good photos and tell interesting stories. Love this!

Voted up and interesting!


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Jill of alltrades,

Thanks so much for the compliment and the vote up. Very kind of you.

I'm certainly glad that you enjoyed the Hub - the reason I do what I do! Makes it worth the effort when I get such nice comments like your.

I look forward to reading and commenting on your Hubs too.

Play nice and travel safely.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


jenubouka 5 years ago

Beautiful words and pictures. I noticed this sublime bliss too among the villagers when I traveled. I think is has to do with the simplicities of life, and when they see a foreigner perk with curiosity they are humble and delighted. As long as one is respectful and willing to learn.

Voted up, this was great!


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Jen,

Good observation, had not thought of it that way.

Thanks for the compliment, and the vote up - made my day, it did!

Appreciate you taking the time to read and comment on the Hub. Truly wonderful!

Play nice and travel safely.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Nicely done, and voted up!


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Will,

Thanks for the vote up and the compliment.

Just what I like - short, sweet and to the point.

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK

Nice to read this page claptona. It may be an obscure little town to most people, but every town should have its story on a webpage and this is Diriamba's! Pages like this also tell far more about the real people of a country and their day-to-day life than any number of travel guides which focus on the big attractions and city life.

Nice also to see the juxtaposition of the rundown buildings and some of the really attractive and seemingly well-maintained, such as the church. (And I agree about the sky!)


claptona profile image

claptona 5 years ago from Earth Author

Hi Greensleeves,

Thanks so much for the nice compliment! Just makes my day!

Glad to hear you enjoyed the Hub and it very nice of you to leave such a wonderful comment.

To your continued success!

Cheers,

John D. Wilson


Fox Music profile image

Fox Music 16 months ago

Thanks for the Journey !!


claptona profile image

claptona 16 months ago from Earth Author

Thanks Fox Music,

Hope you enjoyed the trip!

Cheers


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 2 months ago from San Diego California

This is a wonderful tale. I really like your no-nonsense way of writing about people and places that you have seen. I envy your ability to do this, and also your courage, because I might be a bit intimidated in a place so obviously different than what I am used to. Great hub.


claptona profile image

claptona 2 months ago from Earth Author

Mel Carriere,

Thanks so much for your comment!

And it's a joy to hear that you enjoyed the hub.

It's kind of like learning to ride a bicycle - scary at first, but once you learn a bit, it becomes less so. Traveling is a joy to be cherished, that's for sure!

Thanks again for your kind words.

Cheers,

John

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working