Guide To Ibiza Cruise Port, Balearic Islands

Ibiza harbor and old town
Ibiza harbor and old town

Introduction to Ibiza

The culture of Ibiza is as varied as the ways you hear people saying its name. 'E-zee-tha', 'e-bee-tha' and 'e-vee-thaa' are all ways of saying the island's name. And it's hard to think of such a diverse blend of people outside Los Angeles or San Francisco. Ibiza attracts all sorts of people with its buzzing nightlife, beautiful beaches and dependable weather.

Throughout history, the 3 Balearic islands, Mallorca, Ibiza and Menorca, were the pawns of regional empires. As early as the fifth century BC Carthagian forces controlled Ibiza. Islamic soldiers arrived during the eight century and kept control until the disintegration of the Caliphate of Cordoba. James I of Aragon won control over the island in the 12th century. Just 50 years passed before James lost control to the independent kingdom of Mallorca. Later the islands returned to the Aragonese crown.

Nowadays the original Ibiza, an attractive island of villagers and fisherman remains. But Ibiza is more famous for its laid-back vibe, its dance-music venues, its chilled beach-bars, and its rocking partying. Hoards of visitors descend upon the island to sample the beach culture and all-night clubs.

Abrigo dock, Ibiza
Abrigo dock, Ibiza

Ibiza Port Information

As your ship sails into the port of Eivissa (or Ibiza Town), you will have a fine view of the imposing walls of the Dalt Vila, or Old Town. The town ramparts were completed in 1585, to protect the town from pirates, and are 75 ft high and 15ft thick. To the right of you lies the new town, the home to one of the biggest nightclubs on the globe, Pacha. Details of all the cruises visiting ibiza can be seen at cruises to ibiza at cruise ship schedules.

Most cruise ships will berth at the outer port of Botafac. It is about a 5 minute coach ride to Ibiza Old Town. Smaller ships will dock at the Muelle Levant quayside, next to the cosmolotian Sa Penya area, just a 3 min stroll to Dalt Vila.

Ibiza Street Market
Ibiza Street Market

Ibiza Shore Excursions

La Marina
La Marina, Ibiza Town's portside district, often just called 'El Puerto', forms the heart of the Ibizan capital. A crooked warren of narrow streets, it's located between the port waters and the mighty walls of Dalt Vila. Its streets and tiny piazzas are brimful with fashionable stores, appealing cafes and hip bars, and a busy market of overburdened stalls.

Dalt Vila
Stroll (or perhaps the better word is climb!) through D'Alt Villa and appreciate nearly-hidden shops, picturesque homes jammed into narrow alleys - all the hallmarks of a tranquil Mediterranean port. You'll have many chances to stop and marvel the view over the town and harbor. At last you'll reach the Placa De Catedral, at the very top, for 360 degree views of the whole island. The island of Formentera is easy to see in the distance.

Museum of Contemporary Art
This museum, located in D'Alt Vila, showcases contemporary Ibizan paintings and sculptures.

Museu Puget
The Museu Puget has a permanent collection of canvasses and pictures by the renowed Ibizan artist Narcis Puget Vinas.

Figueratas
The resort area to the south of Ibiza, and easy to get to thanks to a regular (every half hour) water taxi (which runs from just outside the ubiquitous McDonalds). Here you'll find a very pretty pair of beaches, with good beach facilities, except for the half-height showers!

Playa Den Bossa
To reach Playa Den Bossa beach take a short drive from Ibiza town by taxi or bus, or take the water taxi, which leaves from outside McDonalds. Here is the longest stretch of sand on the island, and is also home to the legendary Bora-Bora beach bar, and the fabulous Space megaclub.

Other Useful Information

Currency: Euro (EUR)
Language: Spanish
Time Zone: GMT +2

More by this Author

  • Guide To New York Cruise Port
    1

    In 1626 a Dutch trading colony, New Amsterdam, was established on Manhattan Island. New Amsterdam was overrun by the English in the mid 17th century and renamed New York. Over the following hundred years New...


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working