The City of Norwich, Norfolk, UK - A Great Place to Visit or Live

The Forum - landmark city centre building housing the Millenium Library, Pizza Express and the very popular Marzanos Cafe.  The forefront is often used for free entertainment and even open air cinema.
The Forum - landmark city centre building housing the Millennium Library, Pizza Express and the very popular Marzanos Cafe. The forefront is often used for free entertainment and even open air cinema.




It has been suggested by some people I know, especially Londoners, that Norwich is situated somewhere in the Back of Beyond. Perhaps there is some truth in that - after all, it is only 1 hour 50 minutes by train from Liverpool Street, but can take significantly longer in a car. There are no motorways in Norfolk, and even when travelling along some of the main 'A' roads, slow moving tractors can hold you up. Aside from that, if you are heading towards Norwich, then you are not on your way to anywhere else - unless your destination is the coast, or a rural town or village. Quite simply, stuck out on the bulge they call East Anglia, there is no other major place to go - assuming you are not thinking of taking a spin across the North Sea.


Church of St. Giles on the Hill (one of many churches in Norwich)
Church of St. Giles on the Hill (one of many churches in Norwich)
The beautiful wistera outside the Church of St. Giles on the Hill, present in early summer.
The beautiful wistera outside the Church of St. Giles on the Hill, present in early summer.

Finalist for UK City of Culture, 2013

In any case, perhaps sitting somewhere in the Back of Beyond only adds to the attraction. After all, who really wants to live on everyone else's doorstep? And anyway, Norwich is now one of the Top 10 shopping destinations in the UK. With plenty of big-name stores as well as many quirky, independent shops hiding down historical back lanes, there is something to suit everyone. Not only that, but Norwich was declared a finalist for the title of UK City of Culture, 2013. One of only four British cities chosen, it eventually lost out to Derry - although that in no way takes away from the fact that Norwich has a lot to offer both visitors and those who live there.


Culture, I hear you say? In the middle of this land of tractors, farmers and squashed pheasants? You'll be surprised. These days, Norwich is becoming more and more diverse. The Norfolk and Norwich Festival, a two week long programme of art, world music, circus displays, elaborate cabaret and family entertainent, takes place during May and has something for everyone, some of it free. Aside from that, there is the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, popular musicals and plays staged at the Theatre Royal, and a whole host of well known bands that have performed at the University of East Anglia (UEA).

A street artist outside Norwich Market
A street artist outside Norwich Market

From Medieval to Modern

Norwich is a comparatively small city, dating back to medieval times. However, it used to be one of the most important cities in England. Many examples of its medieval history still remain for all to admire - out of the 57 medieval churches originally contained inside the city walls, 31 still stand intact.

Norwich has an attractive city centre, with two modern shopping malls blending effortlessly with history. There are also many appealing independent shops, located down the small side streets, such as the 'Lanes'. Norwich has a thriving and colourful outdoor market selling everything from fruit and vegetables, to second hand books, to pet necessities, asian spices, hats, bags and clothes. It also has an organic fruit and veg stall, one of the only independent places to purchase organic goods in Norwich.

To the side of the market stands the Guildhall, on Gaol Hill, dating back to the sixteenth century. The Guildhall was built, like so many constructions in the city, from local flint. In the past it was a government building, where people went to pay taxes, and was also both a prison and court. Today it houses Angel's Crystal Shop and Caley's Cocoa Cafe.

Norwich Castle Museum
Norwich Castle Museum

Norwich Castle Museum

Norwich Castle is an imposing but majestic building that looks down over the city centre. It dates back to the 11th Century, and was built on the orders of William the Conqueror, as a Royal Palace for the Normans. Stone for the castle was brought by boat from Caen, in northern France - a long, ardous process. The boats brought the stone as far as Great Yarmouth, Though Norwich is now considered a relatively small city, back in those bygone days it was actually one of the biggest cities in England - only London and York were larger.

Life in Medieval Britain was colourful and violent. The city was surrounded by a stone wall, of which only ruins remain today, with the castle used to spot any invaders. The castle became a prison (a very bleak and torturous one) in the 1400's, and executions took place outside for all to see. You can take a tour of the dungeons and learn all about the grim lives of the prisoners held there. Tours of the battlements are also available.

Following its days as a prison, Norwich Castle became a museum in the 1800's. It is interactive in some areas and, amongst other things, you can learn about the Iceni people, see Egyptian treasures and find out about old prison life in the Keep. If you depart through the attached Regiment Museum, you pass through a First World War 'bunker', but once you have left the Museum at this exit you may not re-enter.

Norwich Cathedral
Norwich Cathedral
View of the cathedral from inside the cloisters
View of the cathedral from inside the cloisters
The Cloisters
The Cloisters
The Adam and Eve - oldest public house in Norwich
The Adam and Eve - oldest public house in Norwich

Norwich Cathedral and the Adam and Eve Public House

Norwich Cathedral is a fine example of Norman architecture. It is over 900 years old and stands tall and proud amidst lovely surroundings. It has the second tallest spire and second largest medieval cloisters in the whole of England. It also boasts the largest amount of decorative roof bosses in the country. It is a stunning building, with beautiful displays of artistic stone work, carvings and stained glass.

Many a time, we have eaten lunch in the nearby Adam and Eve pub, with its low ceilings, stone floors and its own stories - records date back to 1249 and it is known as the oldest public house in Norwich. In fact, underneath this old alehouse a Saxon well still remains, verifying that the site has been in use for at least 1500 years. Interestingly, it was workers who were helping with the construction of Norwich Cathedral who used to drink in the Adam and Eve. They were not paid with money, but given bread and ale for their laborious efforts, by the monks who owned it. The monks also used to give their ale to the patients in the Great Hospital - apparently to aid their recovery!

In its time, the Adam and Eve has seen both blood thirsty battle and notorious murder. Thankfully, times have now changed, and the Adam and Eve is a popular location for a quiet drink or a spot of lunch.

From the Adam and Eve, you can walk along the riverside, right down and round and back through the Cathedral Close to the cathedral itself. There are old houses situated within the grounds, many are residential -  but not just anyone can live there, you have to apply. The Close with the little houses and green are almost like a little, old fashioned village, perhaps from a Miss Marple film - without the murders of course!

The Catholic Cathedral of St. John the Baptist
The Catholic Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

Two Cathedrals

Perhaps somewhat usually, there are actually two cathedrals in Norwich. The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is located on leafy Earlham Road, across the bridge and just outside the main centre. Though seemingly of historical appearance - it has a rather gothic look about it - the Catholic Cathedral was not built until the turn of the twentieth century.  Both cathedrals dominate their skylines.

Looking down Elm Hill
Looking down Elm Hill
Elm Hill
Elm Hill
Britons Tea Rooms, at the top of Elm Hill
Britons Tea Rooms, at the top of Elm Hill
Old, leaning house at Tombland, opposite the Cathedral entrance - now an antique shop
Old, leaning house at Tombland, opposite the Cathedral entrance - now an antique shop

Elm Hill

Would a visit to Norwich be complete without a walk down the cobbled street of Elm Hill? I think not. Close to both the city centre and Norwich Cathedral, Elm Hill is a small but quaint street of historic, timber framed buildings dating back to the Tudor times. In fact, there was life at Elm Hill well before this period, yet many of the pre-existing houses were destroyed by the Great Fire in 1507. Elm Hill was rebuilt, and many of the Tudor houses remain today. In fact, this small, medieval cobbled street actually contains more genuine Tudor houses than the entire city of London.

Nowadays, most of the houses in Elm Hill are occupied by independent businesses. Elm Hill is a haven for those interested in antiques. There are tea rooms, like Britons Arms on the corner and a cafe selling organic tea at the forefront of a tiny courtyard. There is an old fashioned toy shop and a shop dedicated to teddy bears. But you don't have to buy anything - shopping just isn't the point. Simply ambling down Elm Hill is a real delight; a step back in time. It has also found its way onto the big screen - most recently, in the film 'Stardust', released in 2007. To quote Stardust location manager Emma Pil, 'It is a magical street....'

Dragon Hall

Situated on King Street, Norwich, Dragon Hall is a medieval building dating as far back as 1430. It was actually a merchant's trading hall when it was first constructed, and is now a Grade 1 listed building. In the Great Hall, you can see the magnificent carved dragon, from which the building gets its name.

Though Dragon Hall's days as a trading hall were relatively short lived, the site on which it was built has a long and varied history. From the 1300's, it is known that Anglo Saxon's lived on the site.

Free guided tours are held on Tuesdays at 2pm. The Hall is closed to the general public on Saturdays.

The Fountain, viewed through the trees
The Fountain, viewed through the trees
The sloping steps leading up to the summerhouse - The summerhouse is a reconstruction, but built both in the same style and position as the original
The sloping steps leading up to the summerhouse - The summerhouse is a reconstruction, but built both in the same style and position as the original
Views across the gardens
Views across the gardens
Looking down from the summerhouse - can you imagine the Victorian parties?
Looking down from the summerhouse - can you imagine the Victorian parties?

The Plantation Garden - A Hidden Victorian Gem

The Plantation Garden is like a secret, almost hidden from the street. It would be easy to walk straight by and never notice it was there at all, if not for the sign. The garden is situated behind the Beeches Hotel on Earlham Road, just past the Catholic Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. There is a small charge/donation for entry, to help with the general maintenance and upkeep of this Victorian treasure - all the work is carried out by volunteers.

On most days, the garden is quiet and guests explore the three acres of greenery at their leisure. On open days, however, free guided tours explaining the history of the garden, are offered. There are also many other events held throughout the year, such as tea and cakes every Sunday afternoon, a jazz music evening and a big band night.

In 1897, Henry Trevor acquired the site where the Plantation Garden now lies, and transformed it from a disused chalk quarry into this beautiful garden. In fact, this part of Norwich is riddled with old chalk mines, as a county bus driver found out some twenty years ago when the front end of his bus nosedived into the road and became stuck.

Henry Trevor put a lot of care and thought into his garden. Because it was created in a quarry it is set on different levels. He planted flowers, grasses, and even built a fountain and a summer house, overlooking the lawns. But Henry Trevor, a well known character in the area, wasn't satisfied with creating a garden simply for his own pleasure. He delighted in seeing other people enjoying it, so he often invited many guests for his numerous garden parties.

From the water's edge, Whitlingham Country Park
From the water's edge, Whitlingham Country Park
Views of Whitlingham
Views of Whitlingham
One of many swans - Whitlingham Country Park, Norwich
One of many swans - Whitlingham Country Park, Norwich

Whitlingham Country Park

Whitlingham Country Park is situated at Trowse, so close to the city centre that it is almost as though a part of the countryside exists within the city itself. If you fancy a break from all the hustle and bustle that city life undoubtedly brings, then take a visit to this peaceful and clean, partly man-made area. At Whitlingham, ducks bob alongside swans and geese on still waters. Tall, mature trees bring a welcome calmness; while fishermen wait patiently (fishing is only permitted in certain areas). A new activity centre allows you to experience the excitement of canoeing or sailing (pre-booking is necessary), or you can sit on the stony 'beach' and skim flat pebbles. Further down, you can walk through cool woods - or you can even walk round the whole of the country park, following the water's edge, if you have a good couple of hours to spare.  Sometimes you might see a train, as the track lies nearby, but other than that, Whitlingham is a haven for walkers; nature lovers and those just looking for peaceful respite.

Staying in Norwich

There are many hotels and guest houses in Norwich. The most convenient location to stay in is around the Earlham and Unthank Road area (the Golden Triangle). There are many guest houses around here, though they do get quite booked up in summer. It is an attractive area in which to stay, and it is also within walking distance of the city centre and many of the main attractions. The walk into the centre from here is pleasant, and there are places to eat right on your doorstep.

Moving to Norwich

If you are thinking of moving to Norwich, then the 'Golden Triangle', a residental area close to the city centre, is the place to be. People arrive and never want to leave. It's so easy to become caught in this little bubble; it's almost a village within a city. The community feeling in this part of the city is quite magnetic. There are families with children (the best primary schools are found here), young couples, many professionals and a hoard of students, for Norwich boasts the excellent University of East Anglia. The School of Environmental Science is considered in very high regard - in fact, it is one of the best research centres of its kind in the world.  

It is also worth noting that Norfolk has recently been declared the 'safest county in England'. Not only that, but East Anglia has the lowest rainfall in the country. Beautiful countryside and coastline are also within easy reach.

Ruins of the old city wall
Ruins of the old city wall

A City Still Going Strong

Norwich is both modern and cosmopolitan, yet at the city's very heart its historical overtures still play on. From Medieval to Tudor, Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian - the stories of Norwich's past stand proudly beside all things new. Everything considered, this small city called Norwich, stuck out on the bulge they call East Anglia, really does have a lot going for it.

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Comments 40 comments

ethel smith profile image

ethel smith 6 years ago from Kingston-Upon-Hull

Wow. That is a great travel hub Polly. Thanks. I have never been to Norwich but I would like to now. I will link to my UK Hub as long as you do not mind.


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi Ethel, you're welcome, I'm really pleased you liked it. Thank you for linking it to your UK hubtrail, I appreciate it.


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 6 years ago from Maui and Arizona

This is an amazing article. And this part:

"Norwich Castle is an imposing but majestic building... William the Conqueror, as a Royal Palace for the Normans. Stone for the castle was brought by boat from Caen, in northern France - a long, ardous process...." really surprised me. I didn't know they did things like that back then.

My many-times-great grandfather was Rudolphus de Kinnaird, a Norman Viking who was given land by William the Conquerer.

Elm Hill looks so inviting. Makes me want to become a traveler. How wonderful that must be to walk down those streets and into those shops.

The Plantation Garden has the same kind of history as The Butchart Gardens in Victoria, British Columbia. Both are very beautiful gardens which someone cultivated from an old quarry.

Just before coming to your paragraph about Stardust, I was thinking I wonder if you could -- not now but one day in a year if you're not too busy -- suggest to me some good shows on DVD of England's era of 1800's. Then I saw your Stardust paragraph and went to have a look. I don't like Fantasy shows, but I see from my googling that Stardust links to the BBC, so I'll look there and onward. If you ever want to watch a good show about Canadian days-gone-by (I'm from Canada) there are the movies and tv shows on DVD which were inspired by Lucy Maude Montgomery's books. She lived in the 1800's and turn of the century on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Life was simple then. The movies are called Anne of Green Gables and the television series which followed is called (my favorite) The Road to Avonlea. I don't watch tv, but I do collect these DVD's.

Thanks for a superb article.


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi Pamela, thank you for your long and thoughtful comments, I'm really pleased you enjoyed this.

Yes, it is true about the Castle being built using Caen stone transported from France - I believe this stone was also used for other landmark buildings in Britain. I really do think the effort people went to to build beautiful buildings in those days makes modern day efforts seem very inadequate. In the old days buildings were built over decades - now it is all rush, rush and it is all about the cost. (I know that's true, builder friends tell me!) I have written another hub about Zlatni Rat beach on Brac Island, Croatia, in which it tells how white stone on the island was transported and used to build the White House in Washington, amongst other famous buildings worldwide. It was very interesting, also, to hear of your many times great grandfather.

The Plantation Garden is beautiful but quite small, if I am right in thinking, compared to Butchart Gardens. I have not been there at all, but I used to work for a specialist tour operator selling holidays to Canada. I did get to go to Canada twice, to Quebec City, Montreal and Nova Scotia. It's a very beautiful country and what inspired me the most was the huge expanses of space and the mountains. In Nova Scotia we were on a car rally, which just meant that we had hire cars to drive from place to place in, and I simply loved the fact that you can just drive and drive and hardly see another car on your journey. Not so in the UK, you are lucky to get to the end of the road without getting held up!!

Hope you find the dvds you're looking for. I'll have a think about it anyway. Do you mean fictional shows, set in those times? I'm sure there are many, just can't think off the top of my head right now.

Anyway, thanks again for reading.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 6 years ago from England

Hi, Polly, this is lovely, I had no idea! know you see what you've done? I want to come and take a look for myself! seriously I love these sort of places, somewhere that I would not normally have thought of. from the pictures certain parts remind me of Henley which is just up the road from where I live in Marlow. thanks for this great information. rated up because I love it! cheers nell


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hey Nell, you should definitely come and visit! I love living in Norwich - I've been here 13 years now, though I already lived quite close before, down on the Suffolk Coast. Not too long a journey for you either. I will have to look up pictures of Henley now - I've heard of it but know nothing about it, though for some reason I think I have the wrong image of it in my mind. Isn't it funny how we sometimes hold an idea of a place which is totally inaccurate? Nice to see you here, thanks for reading :)


climberjames profile image

climberjames 6 years ago from Steel City

My girlfriends brother lives in Norwich but I have never been, I would like to though, great informative hub!


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi James, that's a coincidence, maybe you should come and visit him. It is a bit like York, though unfortunately Norwich is not a good place for rock climbing!


climberjames profile image

climberjames 6 years ago from Steel City

Hmm I do like York, sucks about the climbing . . .


ellinor 6 years ago

A wery informative hub-thanks


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi Ellinor, thank you for your comments, and for reading :)


MaryRenee 6 years ago

Polly: What a great hub! I've always wanted to visit Norwich. It just looks so beautiful and full of history. I definetly want to visit one day. Thanks for sharing this awesome hub! :)


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

MaryRenee, it's great that you say you've always wanted to visit Norwich, to be honest I'm surprised that you've even heard of it! It is lovely and has so much history, including other places that I haven't fitted into the hub - perhaps I'll do another one, more of an off-the-beaten-track Norwich.. Anyway, thanks for reading and leaving such a great comment :)


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

What a beautiful place it must be! I would love to visit sometime. Thanks for sharing all youir love and knowledge!

Love and peace

Tony


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Thanks Tony, yes, it is a great city, as cities in England go - I moved here 13 years ago though have always lived close enough to visit. Anyway, thanks for stopping by, much appreciated :)


kaltopsyd profile image

kaltopsyd 6 years ago from Trinidad originally, but now in the USA

Oh I long for the day I can travel to the UK (that rhymes...hehe). I also want to travel to New Zealand and Australia. My mum always says, "When we finally can afford a vacation, we're going to England first!" Haha. She wants to LIVE in England. I just want to visit but I told mum that I wanted to go live in New Zealand. Don't ask why. I just had the urge to do so.

Great Hub. Very useful. I hope one day I'll be able to visit.

-K. Alto


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi Kimberley, nice to see you here! Hope you manage to visit England one day, I'm sure you would have a great time - just make sure you visit other places besides London (like Norfolk, for instance!)otherwise you will not have the true picture or see those quaint little cottages I imagine people in America might want to see.

I would like to go to Australia as well, I have a friend there who invited us to visit, but it is such a long way (24 hour flight) and would cost us around £2000 plus just in airfares. Nevermind, maybe when we have written a few more hubpages, lol!(like about 3000!!) The nearest I have gotten so far is Bali, but that was before we had kids. Very beautiful, though, probably the nicest place I have ever been.

Anyway, thanks for stopping by, much appreciated :)


ryankett 6 years ago

You forgot to mention The Puppet Man! How could you! although apparently he has retired now?

Which part of Norwich are you from? Don't worry I'm not asking for your address!


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Ryan - lol! I knew I'd forgotten something - the legendary Puppet Man! I'm not sure if he's retired, I saw him a while back, my two year old son does an excellent impression. I'll try to get a pic of him next time, and add it, so the world can see how great the entertainment in Norwich is!!

I live near to Earlham Road, the city end - not far from the Black Horse. Which part of the city are you in?


ryankett 6 years ago

Not too far from there, 'pub geography' don't you just love it? I am very close to The Fat Cat, in fact literally 100 yards, I have just bought a home near there. Crazy crazy small world!


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Really? My god, that is freakily close. It would take me about 5 mins to walk there (not that I'm inviting myself round!) I have a memory of getting drunk in the Fat Cat on a deceptively strong fruit wine, though that was some years ago now.

I used to work in the Pickwick (now the Fountain) and the Black Horse, part time.


mioluna 6 years ago

I add one more city in my travel list and one more dream in my heart. Thank you for this travel idea Polly C! Very interesting hub and photos are just amazing! I really enjoyed!


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

mioluna, thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it! Hope you get to visit one day :)


Aris Budianto profile image

Aris Budianto 6 years ago from Lying along the equator Country

Wow.. what a wonderful place to visit and great hub so complete, thanks Polly C


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK Author

Hi Aris, thank you - very different from Indonesia, I know!


Christineharper profile image

Christineharper 6 years ago

I love this Hub as I love Norfolk and really miss the family holidays there.Great Hub


Feeling Fit profile image

Feeling Fit 5 years ago from Fitting in Fitness Moves Everywhere!

Dear Polly C:

I truly enjoyed this wonderful travel hub! You truly have brought out the best in Norfolk & shared it in a quite tantalizing way with all of us.

Thank you, too, for the lovely photographs ~ they pair beautifully with your clear, elegant, warm writing style.

Warm regards...Feeling Fit


Polly C profile image

Polly C 5 years ago from UK Author

@ Feeling Fit, thank you for your lovely comments and compliments :)


ayyappan ganesan 5 years ago

Hi Polly,

I am migrating from India to Norwich city(As software professional).

your information about the city is very useful.

Thanks a lot!!!


Polly C profile image

Polly C 5 years ago from UK Author

@ ayyappan ganesan - hello there, thank you for commenting on this hub, I'm really glad you found the information useful. I'm sure you will have a great time here, it really is a lovely city. I'm actually wondering if you are coming here to work at Aviva? My husband works there as an IT professional, many people from India have come over to do the same thing. Whatever, good luck and I hope you get on well :)


MJFenn profile image

MJFenn 5 years ago

Good hub! Norwich is 'a fine city', as the signs there say.


Polly C profile image

Polly C 5 years ago from UK Author

@ MJFenn - thank you, and yes, the signs do say that, have you been here?


Tas 4 years ago

Thanx Polly for that luvly & informative piece. We r actually coming this weekend to visit & have a look around as my hubby has a job offer just outside Norwich. I have two daughters (7 & 5yrs). Can I get some advice pleez...can u tell me which r nice places to live in that have good schools (& also fall in catchment areas of good high schools). Hope u can be of assistance since I'm really baffled. We will be visiting again during the Easter holidays. But this weekend I definitely want to visit Elm Str. & the Plantation Gardens. Cheers Polly x


Polly C profile image

Polly C 4 years ago from UK Author

Hi Tas, I hope you enjoy your visit this weekend, hopefully we should have lovely weather as well! In the actual city the very best place to live, in my honest opinion, is the Golden Triangle area. I have lived there for almost all the time I have been in Norwich (15 years now) and I absolutely love it - I also wrote an article solely about that, you can find it if you look at my profile. I have two children as well, and find it an ideal family location. It also has the best infant school in the whole city (Recreation Road Infant School, read the Ofsted Report)and good junior schools nearby - Avenue Junior (at which my son finished last year) and Colman Junior School. High Schools don't have exact catchment areas, it is measured as the crow flies and the closest children get a place.

I love the easy access to the city centre (within walking distance), fantastic parks (Eaton Park, Heigham Park)and the friendly atmopshere. By the way, the Plantation Gardens are just inside in the Golden Triangle so you will have some idea when you come. Also,there is a science exhibition in the Forum in the centre this Saturday, with free activities for children.

If you don't want to live right in the city itself but on the outskirts, let me know and I'll give you some more info on the surrounding areas. I like being in the city myself, as it's more convenient and my oldest son is at an age where he is just starting to go out on his own with his friends.

Thorpe is also quite nice, but in my eyes (and I lived there once, for 6 months) it doesn't have so much of a community feel or as many facilities on your doorstep.

I've got to go now, to take my son to preschool, but let me know if you would like any further advice.

Best Regards,

Polly


Polly C profile image

Polly C 4 years ago from UK Author


Geoff Clayton 4 years ago

Norwich is a great place to live. Have a decco at www.takeheart.co.uk/oldrec/


Joe Cook profile image

Joe Cook 3 years ago from UK

Some wise observations there - and some picturesque photos. Maybe a mention of the ubiquitous puppet man would be good?


Polly C profile image

Polly C 3 years ago from UK Author

Hi Joe - yes, someone else mentioned the puppet man, maybe I should incorporate him somewhere. Definitely an icon of the city centre!! Are you from Norwich then?


Polly C profile image

Polly C 3 years ago from UK Author

@Joe Cook - I think I will take my camera out with me next time and hope to get a pic of him , or maybe a video otherwise no one else will quite understand!


Ed Nitz 21 months ago

Lived here20 years made mistake of buying my flat.Norwich and outlying areas are PURE nimby land.DO NOT expect a friendly welcome if u are not a 200 TH gen Norwich ite

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