ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Adopting Sibling Cats

Updated on December 7, 2016
Source

Bother Cat, Sister Cat

Why we adopted sibling cats

We have cats — four of them. I’m not sure how it happened. In most other ways we’re a pretty sane and harmless family, but the four of us now have one cat apiece. There are many, many wonderful things about our cats and our life with them, but one of the best parts is the fact that they are two pairs of siblings: Momo and Squeaky are bother and sister, and Milo and Bumper are sixte and brother (we know that Milo is a boy’s name, but that wasn’t up to us — it was up to one of our kids, who just liked the name. So her name is Milo). Cat sis and bro combos are pretty sweet. Behavior-wise, it’s a natural match, since they often huddle up with each other and have an evening groom/bath, or wrestling match, or both. Our decision to adopt sibling cats is backed up by science, which suggests that sibling cats are happier together than solo or unrelated cats. And finally, having sibling cats has given our sibling humans a sense of responsibility and ownership. This article will give you a glimpse into what it’s like to adopt cat siblings, and why many experts recommend it.

Sibling Cats -- The Cuddle Factor

Watch our sibling cats for just a few minutes and you'll see why it was such a good idea to adopt them together. They greet each other with sharps and stretches. And their temperaments mirror their siblings in interesting and sometimes unpredictable ways. Milo and Bumper, for example, are by nature outgoing. Bumper loves to be picked up and will actually put his arms around your next. Milo, his cat sister, is also outgoing, with a touch of anarchy to her personality — Milo, the girl with the boy’s name, is by far the most aggressive and assertive member of our cat clan. She is the first to greet you at the door, the first to the food bowl, the first to slip outside and prowl around, and if you’re not paying attention while you’re petting her, she’ll give ou a pretty serious nip on the arm. She’s essentially gently, though, like her brother. Milo and Bumper and sibling cats in gnereal, will groom each other and display other behavior that reflects the communal nature of cat society in the wild.
Momo and Squeaky, our other cat bro/cat sis pair, are a but less saddle with each other. Why? We have no idea, just as we have no idea what goes on in their heads in general. But they are clearly cut from the same cat cloth, and we have never regretted adopting them from the shelter together.

Source

The Experts Agree

Not only do daily observations of our sibling cats prove that they love life together -- the science backs it up, too. Research has shown that house cats have many io the same instincts and preferences as do their wild counterparts. Domestic housecoats are descended from the lynx, a smallish wild cat that still thrives in temperate parts of the world. Wild cats use smell to navigate their world, and the litter smell that they experienced at birth stays with them from the moment they come into the world. The same is true of domesticated cats. Our cat siblings often curl up together to sleep, and when they’re woken together they pop up into the exact same position together, alert and ready to face whatever’s coming. If you adopt bother and sister cats, you’ll see all kinds of little reminders that these animals are related to all felines, from lions to lynxes. Our domestic cats remind us every day of the ways in which the wild blood of their not-so-distant relatives still runs in their veins. It’s amazing to watch sometimes, as they recreate scenes of lion prides lounging on the Serengetti.

Source

Get Your Human Sibs in on the Fun

Give Your Kids a Sense of Responsibility and Pride (That’s “pride,” as in “a pride of lions.”)

Our kids were given our second pair of cat sibs at Christmastime when they were 10 and 12. We knew, of course, what was involved in taking care of cats, since we ad already had Momo and Squeaky for several years t that point. Our boys took to the new responsibility quickly, and the things they weren’t able to deal with — vaccines, emergencies, and so on — we were ready for. But our boys welcomed their cats into their lives, and the cats responded to them as if they had a surrogate mom. Both Milo and Bumper still sleep in their boy-owners’ rooms, at the food of the bed, and there’s a bond between them that’s easy to see but hard to define. I don’t know — maybe they share the same litter smell…

Kitten Siblings!

Our Four Cats and the Moment We Just Knew...

At the adoption agency in our midwestern city, there were about 5 entire litters of kittens that had been rescued from the cold winter streets and alleys. These little kittens and been separated from their mothers and put up for adoption, but they were still all together in their own glass-enclosed habitat. So it was clear to us that to take one away would not only mean we took home a lonely kitty — it would also mean we were leaving his siblings without one of their own. Our boys voted for adopting all five of them, but even we have limits, so we settled for two, a male and a female. It worked out so well that we immediately started recommending the step to our friends and family. In their glass habitat, the kittens were a jumble of sleeping and tumbling fur-balls, but once we got our two little guys home, they began to establish their personalities right off the bat. And as time went on and their bond became evident, we decided to do it again — in the guise of getting the boys a once-in-a-lifetime Christmas present.

Think Like a Cat!

Think Like a Cat: How to Raise a Well-Adjusted Cat--Not a Sour Puss
Think Like a Cat: How to Raise a Well-Adjusted Cat--Not a Sour Puss

We read several books about our cats, and this one if by far the most entertaining. Who knew this is how they think?

 

Cat Adoption Facts

The ASPCA website offers some revealing facts about pet adoption:

  • There are over 13,000 animal shelters in the US, and they are largely not monitored. That's a lot of dogs and cats in shelters with little or no oversight! Adoption definitely makes sense when you think of it that way.
  • Almost 8 million animals enter shelters every year, and nearly half of those are cats.
  • Adoption accounts for the fate of about 3 million of those 8 million animals

When you do the math, it's clear that there are millions of animals being born that don't live to find a good home. Stray cats and dogs in the US, according to ASPCA statistics, are impossible to estimate, though estimates for cats alone approach 70 million.

Stray Cats in California

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)