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Cat Pregnancy - Its Delivery Time!

Updated on August 10, 2011

Did you know that One out of every four American families has a pet cat and some have more than one. However, If you don't have your very own cat to appreciate and love its eccentricities and incomparable behaviors...You should consider getting one! If you're an ailurophile (A cat lover), Visit my blog...

Facts About Cats and I'll introduce you to the interesting and likely unknown facts about cats and their behavior, lifecycle, senses, and habits.

Ever wondered if Cat's are smarter than Dog's? Read my featured Article...

Cats or Dogs Smarter - Are Dogs Really Smarter Than Cats?

Cat Pregnancy...Are You Ready?

Cats have been delivering for as long as there have been cats, so just about every mother cat have the inherent aptitude they need to make the delivery go smoothly. Oversight from a calm and soft owner is always a good idea, as occasionally things can go wrong. If the mother is fit and healthy and has a secure spot to deliver her kittens, typically everything goes good and is finished rapidly. You should not have to step in unless she's showing signs of distrait.

It's a good idea to have a telephone number for a vet that you'll be able to call after regular business hours, like human babies kitties tend to decide to make their entrance in the middle of the night, and emergencies can't wait until morning.

A day or 2 prior to her giving birth, your Queen will become really fidgety and start actively searching for the ideal location to deliver her kittens. This doesn't necessarily imply that she will deliver at once, some cats start this process as much at 3 days earlier before the start of labor. Once she appears to be prepared, keep the lights dim and make certain she Is not disturbed by people or other pets.

A cardboard box lined with some old bath towels makes a superior delivering box. Do not use any bath towels you want to keep. Although a lot of people wish their kids to watch the miracle of life, kids can be very distressing for the mother cat unless they are able to sit calmly and very quietly for a few hours. It usually takes at least 2 hours to deliver a full litter of kittens, and some of the times as long as 6 hours.

When labor starts, the mother cat will begin purring and breathing hard. She will likely commence licking herself really persistently. She will not desire to eat anything, and she could breath with her mouth open, yowl, or pace about restlessly. As she gets nearer to delivering her kittens, she might lay down on her side. While she starts squatting, she's just about to give birth to her first kitten.

 A mother cat generally delivers her 1st kitten inside an hour after the commencement of labor. Frequently the kittens come very much sooner. If she has not delivered at least one kitten within 4 hours after she starts having contractions, you should give your veterinarian a call. Commonly the kittens are delivered less than an hour apart. Each kitten will be born in its own amniotic sac, and at once after birth the mother will start licking the kitten to get rid of this sac. If she doesn't show interest in the kitten directly, you might need to assist cleaning the sac from its mouth and nose so the kitten is able to breathe. If the mother doesn't lick the kitty, place it in a warm towel and rub it briskly.

Once each new kitten is delivered, the mother should deliver a placenta. She will ordinarily consume some or all of her placentas. Try to keep track of them as they come out, and make certain there's a placenta for each kitten. An undelivered placenta can cause the mother cat to become sick. If she doesn't bite through the umbilical cord, you might have too to tie it off with dental floss and cut it yourself. It's better if the mother tends to the newborn kittens herself. When she washes them and nursing them, she's bonding with her new kittens.

A kitten shouldn't spend more than 10 minutes within the birthing canal. If you observe that a kitten is having trouble coming out, you can attempt to grasp its hips or shoulders with a clean cloth and pull very gently. Dissimilar to human babies, kitties can be delivered head-first or tail-first. If you're certain there's still another kitten that needs to be delivered, and it's been more than 5 hours since the last kitten was delivered, take the mother to an emergency veterinarian.

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    • profile image

      ChristineAZ85746 

      6 months ago

      My cat gave birth to 6 kittens on 3/7/18. How soon can I start to touch or hold the kittens?

    • profile image

      isabel 

      5 years ago

      the hugs are so cute my cat is almost going to labor i cant wait yee

    • profile image

      maria 

      6 years ago

      i read all this stuff about taking ur cat to the vet but that's kinda hard to do when ur cat goes into labor @ nite..maybe a little more home remedy info for stuff like this when a vet is not availible!!!

    • profile image

      Lucky Cats 

      7 years ago

      Very very excellent information and help for those who have a pregnant cat while pregnant and upon giving birth and afterwards...all your hubs work together to offer a complete picture. Thank you so much! I hope others are learning as much as I am through your excellent work. Voted UP Useful, Awesome and Beautiful...LOVE the pictures and the gentle hand holding the newborn kitten.

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