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Life of Birds

Updated on December 9, 2012

A few days prior, I read "Ravens, Crows, Magpies, and Jays," by Tony Angell. It had tickled my fancy so much, I must repeat it for you here.

"A man had a pet raven that he let out one morning. He soon heard the bird struggling with something a short time later and wondered what it might be. He called the bird back to him, which took a few minutes for him to return. The bird had a clothespin in his mouth, which impressed the man so much, he gave the bird his favorite food that he referred to as Ambrosia, a mix of overripe bananas and chicken, and all was well

Our hero was let out again the next day, and he was heard struggling with something even greater this time. The raven was called back again, and it took him even longer to return. When he was flying in, it was noticed that he had what appeared to be a white banner behind him. When the raven landed, it was seen that he had a pair of ladies' underwear.

The moral of the story is to keep the raven inside on wash days."

The cordivae, which includes ravens, or the title of the book that I refer to, is a very intelligent family of birds that can speak, use tools, utilize helpers with their offspring, assist other members of their class in danger, and a host of many other things that only highly evolved creatures can accomplish. These are birds that I intend to learn a great deal more about.

To put things simply, humans are not the only ones privy to being able to exist in a society. The animal world does it quite commonly. More good examples are apes and lions. They provide for their families, young are raised, and life exists, not necessarily as one big, happy family, but it is reality for all of those concerned. They live and die as we do, fight battles, and sometimes, must even move to other territories in order to survive with those necessities, food and water.

So next time that you are out in the woods, in the park, or at a wildlife refuge, look around you and see how the lives of animals compare with your own. In order for us all to peacefully coexist, we must allow one another the space in order to do it properly.

I tend to tell people that ask me how to help birds raise their young to provide a little dryer lint in the spring outside their doors or under a tree. Just be sure that the dryer lint has no traces of fabric softener or any other chemicals. Dog or cat hair placed in a suet feeder hung in a tree is helpful, too. Just a couple of common things can help so much and it will keep the dryer lint and animal hair out of your trash, so in effect, you're recycling. Also in the winter, provide some black oil sunflower seeds so all that energy that birds expend to keep warm is helped along by the high calorie content in these seeds.

Thanks for what you do, and have a rewarding spring.


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    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Edson, I wish you good fortune and it is my sincerest hope that medicine will find a cure for this debilitating condition.

    • profile image

      Edson 2 years ago

      Hi Lindsay and Amy I really hope you reply even thgouh it has been 2 years since you've posted on here I'm so glad to have found this site. My name is Nichole and I am almost 23 years old, I have suffered with NDPH since I was 16. I was a Sophomore in high school, it was near the end of 2006 when I got sick with bronchitis and the flu and coughed and coughed and noticed I had a really terrible headache with it. Once the sickness went away I noticed that the migraine, that pain in my head that had been so foreign to me prior to this, had not gone away, and still has not to this day I had to be home schooled and quit all of my sports I was a part of My friends went on with their lives and forgot about me while I had a constant 24/7 pain that I could not get rid of no matter how hard I tried or how much it killed me, physically and mentally. We began with Chiropractors, decompression machines, adjustments, etc. I traveled hours to probably 20 different Chiropractors that all said that they knew what I had and exactly how to treat it. I've tried natural supplements, over the counter medications, 6 Occipital nerve blocks in the back of my head, massage, diets of no wheat, no gluten, no sugar, vegan only, all with no progress. My family understands the pain and how I can be ok one minute but then pick up something slightly too heavy, walk a little too fast, sit down a little too hard and I will have to be in my room with blankets over my windows and absolutely no sound because the pain is so unbearable. It is so frustrating because I too feel like a burden, like ok you have a headache so what? Why can't you stay out late or get up early or work long shifts or run around and be active? But it is so much more than a headache It's become a way of life and althgouh I think I handle it well I know that deep down I am depressed and deeply saddened by it because anytime I stop to think about it or talk to anyone about it I cry instantly. Lindsay, I too have tried the things you have with no help and at Cleveland Clinic where they did my nerve blocks they told me about the program where you stay there for an amount of time. My option they told me about when staying there was a few weeks, they would put me on all these medications and steroid medications, have physical therapy and counseling as well. They also said the FDA would soon be approving the Botox injections, I'm sorry those did not help you either NDPH has altered my life drastically, I can't work as much, I can't run around and just be free, I can't take a full load of classes at a time Basically I just want to thank you for having this site Amy, it is really more helpful than you know, just knowing that I'm not the only one to suffer from this and that I'm not the only one that has this pain to think about every single second of every day Bless you and bless all your readers, may you all find relief from the pain -Nichole

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thank YOU, shiningirisheyes for caring about animals as I do.

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 5 years ago from Upstate, New York

      Thank you. The advice is very much appreciated and glad to know I am handling it the correct way. So glad to hear you adopted but not surprised. Anyone devoting their life to protecting our wild life has to have a big heart. More should adopt. Thank you for all you do.

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      shiningirisheyes, yes, that is the best thing to do. Wait until your robin has raised her young, remove the nest and repair the area. When she has fledged her young, they will all just leave, as the nest is only used for purposes of rearing young. I have a retired racing greyhound myself, age 12.

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 5 years ago from Upstate, New York

      I found this hub both useful and interesting. I admire you for what you are doing for the wildlife. Although not the same wild life, I have a bird (parakeet) that I rescued from an abusive situation and he now lives like the king he is. Last March I said goodbye to my dear dog Hope, at 17 yrs old. I adopted her at the age of ten when her elderly owner could no longer care for her.

      I do have a question you may be able to answer. In one of the eaves of my porch, a bird - I think it might be a robin, moved apart one of the boards and has now nested in there. I only found her by accident when I was up on a ladder painting and she came flying out at me. I don't know how to remove the nest without disturbing any young or the bird but it is in an area where it must be removed so that I might have the damage repaired. I am willing to wait until there is a better time in the season as I have been waiting since finding her in the early spring.

      Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

      Regards

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      You're so right, Johan. Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean that they have nothing to "say."

    • Johan Smulders profile image

      Johan Smulders 5 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Another interresting post, birds are interresting to watch and we can learn from them.Thanks

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, lex123. It was fun to write, too.

    • lex123 profile image

      lex123 5 years ago

      Enjoyed reading this hub and voted awesome.

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Yes, Klara, write that hub! I want to see and hear about your old garden. Glad that you enjoyed the story. I will keep you in many more.

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      klarawieck 5 years ago

      I missed all the birdwatching I used to do when I lived in my old neighborhood, which was in a more rural area. Now, I live three blocks away from the beach and I look down from my bedroom window and see seagulls and pelicans fly by. It's kind of cool, but I miss waking up on Sunday mornings listening to the singing of mockingbirds.

      You offer some real great tips here. I used to leave small baskets filled with cotton balls and dog hair for the birds. We had a pair of bluejays that kept on coming back year after year. But my favorite ones to watch were the hummingbirds. I had planted a type of jasmine that grew into a small tree and gave out tons of berries, which birds love. The hummingbirds used to come by every morning to collect the nectar from the bell-shaped flowers. I should write a hub on my old garden. I have tons of pictures or the wildlife and the plants.

      Loved the reading! Thank you!!!

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Make sure that the dryer lint has no traces of fabric softener or any other chemicals. Dog and cat hair in a suet feeder hanging from a tree is good, too, this time of year. As a matter of fact, I will update the hub to include this.

    • Hyphenbird profile image

      Brenda Barnes 5 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

      The dryer lint is a great idea. Those little birds work so hard to build nests and raise families. We have a spoiled cockatiel (named Hyphen) and love him so much. He is wild at heart and I love to hear him sing. He has picked up many wild bird calls as he sits outside in the sun.

    • aviannovice profile image
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      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      I have plenty of bird stories for you, plus a weekly hub on them, so enjoy, my friend.

    • precy anza profile image

      precy anza 5 years ago from USA

      Enjoyed reading this :) Voted up. Flowers and birds always captures my interest.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      How's the dryer lint coming, gamby?

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, Mrs.M. It was one of those things that was easy to write.

    • Mrs. Menagerie profile image

      Mrs. Menagerie 5 years ago from The Zoo

      Love the tips here and the story.

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      gamby79 5 years ago

      Another great article and useful too! I will start saving my dryer lint.

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