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Fabulous Birds

Updated on August 5, 2016

Flame Robin

Flame Robin By Tim Collins CC BY_SA 3.0
Flame Robin By Tim Collins CC BY_SA 3.0 | Source

The Flame Robins scientific name is Petroica phoenicea.

The Flame Robin is found on mainland Australia. You will also find them in Tasmania. They like to live in forests up to 1,800m sea level.

They will move to lower open areas in the winter. You will also find them living in gardens. Some of the birds living in Tasmania will move to the mainland for the winter.



Flame Robin by Gostelow, E  E  Public Domain
Flame Robin by Gostelow, E E Public Domain | Source

The Flame Robin's breast and throat are bright orange. Their lower body and under their tail is white. They are dark slate grey on the top of their head and back. The fold of their wings has a white stripe. They have a black beak and brown legs. The female is not as colorful as the male. The Flame Robin is 12 to 14cm long and weighs 14g.

The Flame Robin will eat insects and spiders. They will catch their food on the ground and to their perch to eat it.

The female will use grass and bark to build a cup shaped nest. She will use spider webs to hold it together. She will put the nest in a tree cavity or on a rock face. The female Flame Robin sits on the eggs and the male brings her food. They both care for the babies.


Green Catbird

Green Catbird By Glen Dergus CC BY-SA 2.5
Green Catbird By Glen Dergus CC BY-SA 2.5 | Source

The Green Catbird is found along the coast of Australia. They like to live in temperate and Sub-tropical rainforests and paperbacks. They will sometimes live in eucalyptus forests.

The Green Catbird is a beautiful green with white spots. Their crown, nape and face is dusky, and their bill is white. They have red eyes.

They will eat fruit, flowers, reptile and plants. They love figs. They are known to rob nests and kill the baby birds, then feed them to their babies. They will form pairs or small groups to look for food in the upper canopy.



Green Catbird By Francesco Varonisi CC BY-SA 2.0
Green Catbird By Francesco Varonisi CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

When it is breeding season they will form pairs. The male will bring the female food all year. Their nest is made of twigs, leaves and vines. They will put their cup shaped nest in a shrub, tree-fork or tree-fern. They put a layer of wet soft wood under the fine twigs and leaves. The female will lay 2 to 3 eggs, and they will hatch in 24 days. The male and female will both care for the babies.


Hooded Pitobul

Hooded Pitobul By markaharpen1 CC BY-SA 2.0
Hooded Pitobul By markaharpen1 CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

You will find the Hooded Pitohul living all over New Guinea. The hooded pitohul and its relatives the Variable Pitohul and the Brown Pitohul are said to be poisonous birds. Their skin and feathers contain a neurotoxin the will cause numbness and tingling if you touch them.

The Hooded Pitohul was the first bird found to be poisonous. They are a beautiful bird and are considered to be the most poisonous. Their body is a gorgeous brick red, and their belly is orange. Their head is black.

Their diet consists of insects, insect larvae, small frogs and small lizards.

They are common in New Guinea and not considered threatened.


Noisy Friarbird

Noisy Friarbird By Glen Fergus CC BY-SA
Noisy Friarbird By Glen Fergus CC BY-SA | Source

The Noisy Friarbird's scientific name is Philemon comiculatus.

You will find the Noisy Friarbird living in Australia. You will also find some in New Guinea. They are found living in dry forests and eucalyptus woodlands, heath lands, wetlands, wet forests and coastal scrub. In the autumn they will go north and in late winter they will go south.

The Noisy Friarbird belongs to the honey-eater family. Their head is naked and black. The top part of their body is brown to grey. The bottom part of their body is off-white. Their throat and upper breast have silver-white feathers. They have a white tip on their tail. You will usually find them up in trees in small noisy groups.

The Noisy Friarbird eats nectar, fruit, insects, eggs and baby birds. They will spend most of their time eating nectar. They will occasionally come down to eat insects

.The Noisy Friarbird form pairs and the female will build a large nest out of bark and grass that is put together with spider webs. The nest is deep and cup-shaped. The female will sit on the eggs and the male will help her feed the babies.

The Noisy Friarbird will damage orchards so they are not popular with farmers. They are vulnerable in some areas.



Red-crested Catbird

Red-crested Catbird By Ltshears Public Domain
Red-crested Catbird By Ltshears Public Domain | Source

The Red-crested Cardinal is a beautiful bird that is found in south America. They prefer slight open areas with shrubs and a few trees. They like to be near water.

The Red-crested Cardinal is 6 to 7 inches long. Their back is dark gray, and the back of their neck and belly is white. Their head crest and upper breast are red. Their bill is silver-gray.

The male and female only come together while breeding season. They will build strong nests using different plant materials in low shrubs. The female will lay 2 to 3 eggs, and she will incubate them for 12 to 13 days until they hatch. The chicks are fed by the male and female. The chicks will fledge in 2 weeks and become independent in another 30 days



Red-crested Cardinal By Nilesh Waradkar CC BY-SA 4.0
Red-crested Cardinal By Nilesh Waradkar CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The red-crested cardinal will eat seeds and insects. They prefer to be near water so they can find insect larvae to feed to their chicks. They adapt well and can live near humans. They have been kept as pets. They will breed very well in captivity.


Red-whiskered Bulbul

Red-whiskered Bulbul By Challiyan GNU 1.2
Red-whiskered Bulbul By Challiyan GNU 1.2 | Source

The Red-whiskered Bulbul's scientific name is Pycnonotus jocosus.

The Red-whiskered Bulbul is found in Asia. In the 1880s they were brought to Sydney, Australia and in the 1990s, they were brought to Melbourne, Australia.

The Red-wiskered Bulbul is found in urban areas. They like to live in parks, gardens and areas bordering creeks.




Red-whiskered Bulbul By Nilesh Waradkar CC BY-SA 4.0
Red-whiskered Bulbul By Nilesh Waradkar CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The Red-whiskered Bulbul's crest is pointed and black. Their cheeks are white and their back is brown. The coverts under their tail are reddish colored. Their tail is long and white tipped.

The Red-whiskered Bulbul will eat fruit, insects and flower buds. They will sometimes form groups to look for food.

They will build their nest using bark and leaves. They will line them with soft material. Their nest is an open cup shape. They will usually put their nest in a low fork in a tree. The male and female will both sit on the eggs and care for the babies.




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    • norlawrence profile image
      Author

      Norma Lawrence 22 months ago from California

      Thanks. I am glad you liked the birds. There are so my beautiful birds.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 22 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      These are all gorgeous birds, and as you know, they are my favorite.

    • norlawrence profile image
      Author

      Norma Lawrence 22 months ago from California

      Thanks billybuc. Glad you enjoyed article. I have never seen a catbird in person.

    • norlawrence profile image
      Author

      Norma Lawrence 22 months ago from California

      Thanks. Appreciate your response. Glad you enjoyed the article.

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 22 months ago from Victoria, Australia

      I know the Robins, and the yellow ones, too, especially up in the Dandenong Ranges, but most of the others are foreign to me. I think they must like warmer climates and it's mighty cold here at the moment. I've met the bulbuls in Sydney and the Friarbirds in PNG. Enjoyed your interesting article and lovely photos.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 22 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I've heard of catbirds since I was a little kid but never actually seen a picture of one or known anything about them. Thanks for the education.

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