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Five Animals that are Completely Monogamous

Updated on December 8, 2015
Monogamous Animals
Wolves
Barn Owls
Bald Eagles
Swans
Black Vultures

Wolves

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It's a myth that wolves are sexually monogamous; they do have multiple mates. They are, however, socially monogamous. Male and female wolves form social bonds where the male will help the female raise her young, regardless of who the father-wolf is.

Do you consider social monogamy to still be "monogamous"?

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Barn Owls

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Barn owls are completely monogamous, unless one of the pair dies. They really do stay true "until death do us part"! They may nest in separate areas during the off-season, but when the mating season comes back around, they always find their way to each other.

Bald Eagles

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Bald eagles behave just like barn owls - they nest in separate sites until mating season, where they return to the same lover year after year.

Swans

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Birds have really got the whole monogamy-thing down! Swans also have the same mate each mating season.

Want to know what the deal is with birds?

They migrate twice a year, have to nest, lay eggs, incubate them, etc. They don't have time for multiple mates!

Do you associate swans with love?

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Black Vultures

Source

Something unique about the black vulture is that they stay with their mate year-round! They stick with their family, even months after the hatch-lings have left the nest.

While monogamy isn't common among the animal kingdom, there are some species that really inspire with the strong bonds they hold in their relationship.

Do you know any other monogamous animals? What's your theory on why they stay monogamous? Do you consider the human species to be monogamous?

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    • sagolia profile image
      Author

      sagolia 21 months ago

      Good to know!

    • Elsie Hagley profile image

      Elsie Hagley 21 months ago from New Zealand

      Don't worry about the misspelling of the URL, (you can't change it), as you said without starting from scratch, the title at the top is right, that is the one that matters. Google sorted it for me, I now know what the word is.

      Keep writing

    • sagolia profile image
      Author

      sagolia 21 months ago

      Sorry about that! I still have not figured out how to change the URL without completely starting an article over from scratch.

      I always love reading about the animal kingdom; it is so interesting!

    • Elsie Hagley profile image

      Elsie Hagley 21 months ago from New Zealand

      Interesting article. I had no idea what Monogomous was, never heard of it, I had to Google it, I see it was spelled wrong in the url

      Came up with this " In this question, monogamy is a noun that means having only one spouse at a time".

      Enjoy learning about those five animals, thanks, I learn something all the time.

    • sagolia profile image
      Author

      sagolia 21 months ago

      I agree - I think it's very interesting. When I was growing up, I remember being taught that males will breed with many females to reproduce as many offspring as possible, all for the purpose of survival (survival of the fittest, right?). Then, you hear about all of these animals that are faithful to each other and their family; it's just very sweet.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 21 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      Interesting to know about the relationship preferences of birds. I had nil idea about this.