ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Is This Snake Venomous? Copperhead VS Corn Snake.

Updated on January 19, 2012
Venomous or no?
Venomous or no?
Source

Will the real copperhead please stand up?

Here's two different kinds of snakes, however they look very similar in appearance.

One is the relatively harmless species called a corn snake. Corn snakes are members of the "rat" snake family-Colubridae. Rat snakes are non-venomous, so they have to disable and kill their prey by strangulation.

The other snake is the infamous copperhead. Members of the viper family, copperheads use their deadly venom to subdue their prey; they are anything but harmless and should be avoided!

So how do you know which is which?

  • First, note the shape of the head. Most venomous snakes have a very obvious diamond-shaped head with two pits between its eyes and nose.


  • Second, look for cat-like eye pupils. This is also a tell-tale sign to keep your distance! Venomous snakes often have these slit type of pupils.

As you probably already guessed, the corn snake is in the first picture, and the other two pictures are of the very dangerous copperhead snake.

Facts about copperheads:

  • Location: mid-Atlantic states and most of the southern states.
  • Habitat: Rocky areas, old wood slab piles, brush piles.
  • Size: 26" to 42"
  • Corn snakes aren't the only non-venomous copperhead mimics; the eastern milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum triangulum), northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon sipedon), and the eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platyrhinos) are also commonly mistaken for copperheads.
  • Copperheads are generally non-aggressive; they aren't on a mission to bite everyone! They want to be left alone, but will bite if threatened. If this happens, SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY.


Remember, snakes are generally our friends.

Yes, it's true! Snakes are nature's terminator, helping farmers and home owners everyday. Their prime food source are rodents, which include mice, rats, and other disease carrying vermin.

Oh, but mice are fluffy and cute! Snakes are ugly!

Being cute isn't that great. Let's take the cons of mice vs the pros of snakes, shall we?

It's the Mice VS Snakes SMACKDOWN!!

VS

  • Snakes: 5-6 people die a year from snake bites. You have a better chance of getting struck by lightning! (Source:http://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/venomous_snake_faqs.shtml)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VS

  • Snakes: They don't chew anything, they swallow things whole. Obviously, they could care less about your electrical wiring.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Mice: These creatures never stop pooping or peeing; besides eating and chewing, it's their favorite past time. More excrement=more disease

VS

  • Snakes: Poop once or twice a week, and usually it's not in your kitchen cabinet or sock drawer.


Clear winner: the snake.




Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • kschimmel profile image

      Kimberly Schimmel 

      6 years ago from North Carolina, USA

      I'm not afraid of snakes, although I did need to learn about poisonous ones when we moved to NC. We have 4 venomous snakes in the state, including the copperhead. You do need to be careful during their mating season, I'm told, because they are not as shy then:)

    • hecate-horus profile imageAUTHOR

      hecate-horus 

      6 years ago from Rowland Woods

      Good points, thank you justmesuzanne!

    • justmesuzanne profile image

      justmesuzanne 

      6 years ago from Texas

      Excellent! Too many people are unaware of the beneficial nature of non-poisonous snakes and the fairly harmless nature of poisonous ones (due to the fact that they tend to avoid human contact as much as possible!) It's unfortunate that some non-poisonous snakes masquerade as poisonous ones for their own protection, since that tactic doesn't help them much when it comes to humans! Another example of this is the non-poisonous yellow-bellied water snake, which looks quite a bit like a water moccasin. Voted up and useful! :)

    • hecate-horus profile imageAUTHOR

      hecate-horus 

      6 years ago from Rowland Woods

      Thanks Nicole!

    • Nicole S profile image

      Nicole S Hanson 

      6 years ago from Minnesota

      Eek! I got the chills just reading this. Informational hub though!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)