ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Life at Boomer Lake with Deb, Saturday June 16, 2012

Updated on December 6, 2012
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck | Source
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck
Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck | Source

An Uncommon Duck

A new visitor was on the lake this week, who doesn’t hail from these parts. Here is the Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck, who comes from the southern tip of TX and central to southern inland FL, and both Mexican coasts. This distinctive and beautiful duck spent three days on Boomer Lake and was alone. A few Mallards tried to provide friendship, but they were ignored by this solitary duck. This bird is supposed to be much more common around the American tropics and the only North American duck with a red bill, which made it seem so distinctive. Fortunately, this duck chose to visit central OK, so I was able to get a few beautiful photos, a definite bonus.

Western Kingbird Feeding the Nestlings
Western Kingbird Feeding the Nestlings | Source
Source

Western Kingbird

Babies are still very high priority. I came across the proud Western Kingbird parents of these three good looking youngsters. Mind you, I only thought that there were two until today, when I was able to see the third. Mother and father were taking turns feeding these little ones, and there was also what appeared to be a helper or a guard in close proximity, too. The parents appeared to be a little skittish and wary, so I quickly took my pictures and left in a couple of minutes. The nest was out in full view, or at least in my line of sight. They didn’t appear to be deliberately trying to draw attention to themselves, but I was pleased that they were on my walking route.

Baltimore Oriole just out of the nest
Baltimore Oriole just out of the nest | Source
Not more than 2 days prior to the top picture
Not more than 2 days prior to the top picture | Source

Baltimore Oriole

Also, I found an older Baltimore Oriole than the first one. This little one was out of the nest and making his way all around the tree for an expedition on the second day that I saw it. I was not aware of any siblings and none of the parents were in sight.

Source

Great-Tailed Grackle

Here’s a little Great-Tailed Grackle fledgling asking for food. The babies always cry and flap their wings to make their point known, and you know, the funny thing is, they always seem to get exactly what they want. Just like human little ones, eh?

Source

Red-Headed Woodpecker

A friend on my walking path, Chuck, stopped me for a few minutes on Monday to chat about a hawk catching a snake and flying off with it. This is the same man that I mentioned last week. It was fortunate that I was delayed a bit, for I came upon the Red-Headed Woodpecker. This is a fast moving woodpecker, and since the light was working against me, I consider myself lucky that I got one decent picture for you to see. I had seen another red head a couple of weeks ago that had been frightened off by a jogger, but I was in the right place at the right time this week.

Source

No Woodpecker Young Ones Yet

The Red-Bellied Woodpecker is still living on the north side of the woods and I stopped by to see if there were any visible young ones. I haven’t seen any as of yet, but that doesn’t mean that none are in his cavity. I am keeping the family in mind each time I go by and hoping for a sign of babies.

Source

Red-Winged Blackbird Fledgling

Mother and father Red-Winged Blackbird were also out with a young one, who was begging for food and getting it on the outing. When they are young, these birds resemble the adult female, as you can see in this picture. A very nice looking bird, I might add!

Source

Box Turtle

Friday, this box turtle was right next to my path, so I couldn’t resist getting a shot. This busy one was definitely on a mission, so I didn’t try to keep it from its business. It was obviously something very important, for it was in a great hurry.

Source

End of the Week

Saturday looked like it was promising a good storm a couple of times with these black skies, but nothing ever came. My journey was cut a bit short in view of this and it was so dark, I lost a few pictures, but nothing that I probably won’t get later. So, I came home and made this for myself http://aviannovice.hubpages.com/hub/Vegetable-Egg-Foo-Yung Keep your head to the skies and your eyes on the ground, and I promise you that you will find something wonderful, sooner or later. In the meantime, Happy Birding!

Scissor -Tailed Flycatcher
Scissor -Tailed Flycatcher | Source
Fledgling Scissor-Tailed Flycatchers
Fledgling Scissor-Tailed Flycatchers | Source
Fledgling Scissor-Tailed Flycatchers
Fledgling Scissor-Tailed Flycatchers | Source

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, pagesvoice. This is a weekly article, plus I do all sorts of other things on bird. Glad to see you here!

    • pagesvoice profile image

      Dennis L. Page 5 years ago from New York/Pennsylvania border

      Voted up, useful, beautiful, awesome and interesting. I am so glad I happened upon this Hub. We share a love of nature and an appreciation of our feathered friends. You have a keen eye for photography and each picture brought a new smile to my face. I think this Hub was one of the most wonderful ones I have read. Thank you.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, girishpuri! I love doing these stories.

    • girishpuri profile image

      Girish puri 5 years ago from NCR , INDIA

      awesome, an addition to my collection, thanks, voted up

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      precy anza, I don't even know yet what you'll be seeing next. But I will promise you this: it will be this weekend!(grin)

    • precy anza profile image

      precy anza 5 years ago from USA

      *nods... nods..* I wonder what I'd be seeing next :)

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Yes, precy anza, it is a lovely shade of red, isn't it? Oh, you know I will always be photographing something!

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, Gloshei. Yes, dust that camera off and let me see those pics around the area.

    • precy anza profile image

      precy anza 5 years ago from USA

      Love the color red on that woodpecker! And those babies are so adorable... love... love.... those photos of the little birds, and at first I thought they were hummers for some reason. Lol .^-^' Keep the photos coming!

    • Gloshei profile image

      Gloria 5 years ago from France

      Hi Aviannovice what a super article and thank you for sharing it. The photos are splendid I must dust my camera off again and get started. Thanks for the inspiration it is what I need at the moment it must be the weather here in Europe is 'bad' so I have the 'SAD syndrome'

      Thumbs up and awesome.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, Nell. No, I just spend a couple of hours each day walking around the lake, and whatever I happen to find is what I photograph. Thanks for telling me about your Red Kites. Do you ever share the chicken with them?

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

      What lovely names, the whistling duck, and the red headed woodpecker! your photos are amazing, you must sit for ages waiting for a great photo, they are lovely, I love sitting down the river watching the birds, and I think the Red Kites, my bird of prey that live in the tree near me think I am their restaurant! they nearly fly in the window trying to get me to give them my chicken! lol! with a wingspan of over five feet it can get a bit of a tight fit in the doorway! lol! wonderful hub, cheers nell

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      I am anxious to read it, Johan. I do so enjoy seeing photos of your birds, reading about them, and learning the landscape of your area.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      You are most welcome, mhatter. It is my way to let you know what is around from week-to-week.

    • Johan Smulders profile image

      Johan Smulders 5 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Another great article. Behaviour of birds is so interresting. Thanks! We had agreat outing to Miliwane Game reserve in Swaziland yesterday-article to follow soon.

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 5 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for sharing this with us.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, Joyce, but I am just me. Birds are my passion!

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Not a problem, Nettlemere. It was my pleasure.

    • writer20 profile image

      Joyce Haragsim 5 years ago from Southern Nevada

      You take such beautiful photo's of your birds, along so much important information .

      You are amazing.

      Voted up beautiful and interesting, Joyce.

      Happy weekend .

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 5 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      Thank you for taking the trouble to give me some additional interesting info on the Kingbird.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Thanks, shiningirish eyes. I love making new discoveries.

    • aviannovice profile image
      Author

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Nettlemere, I am aware of an Eastern and a Western Kingbird. The Latin name has tyrannsi in the name, which is tyrant. I believe that they are aggressive around their territory, hence "king." I'm not 100% certain, but I think that's where the name came from. The kingfisher looks a lot different, in a different order.

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 5 years ago from Upstate, New York

      My favorites are the Western King babies, being feed by Mom. The solitary black-bellied whistling duck may have just been on vacation. Considering all the beauty in your pictures, this may be a possibility.

      Always appreciate your hubs.

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 5 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      I love the whistling duck, I've seen white faced whistling ducks in wildfowl collections in the UK, but not heard of black bellied ones. Also wondering about the Kingbird and how it got its name. It sounds like it ought to be a relative of the kingfisher, but doesn't look like one from your pictures.