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Pony Breeds That are Amazing Part III

Updated on December 27, 2016

Chickasaw Pony

By Geoff Gallice
By Geoff Gallice | Source

The Chickasaw Pony is also known as the Cracker Horse. The Cracker Horse's ancestors came to Florida on or before 1521 with Ponce de Leon, a Spaniard who brought cattle and horses with him. The Cracker horse group is known by many names such as Chickasaw pony, March Tarky, Seminole Pony, Florida Horse, Prairie Pony, Florida Cow Pony, Grass Gut and several others.

It is believed they were from Iberian Blood, with Oriental, Barb, Arabian and Turkman added. Many of the Spaniards horses were stolen, traded and some escaped. The ones that escaped were captured by the Indians. The horses the Indians captured became the foundation stock for the American Mustang.

The Chickasaw Indians had a very good breeding program. They bred their horses for speed and to be quick. The colonists bred the Chickasaw pony to Thoroughbreds from 1746 to the 1800s. Janus, the great grandson of the Godolphin Barb was the thoroughbred used most. Janus became the foundation sire of the American Quarter horse.

The Chickasaw ponies are 14 hands tall. They are well built and very fast for a short distance.

Much effort is now being made by the BLM and other organizations to save the mustang. There are many different strains of Mustangs being persevered. They are the Cayuse Indian Pony, Chickasaw Pony which is also called the Florida Cracker Horse, Spanish Barb, Kiper Mustang, and the Mountain Horse.



Chincoteague Pony

By dbking (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_7936) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By dbking (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_7936) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Chincoteague/Assateague pony is a native of the United States. The are a feral pony that makes its home on two islands that are off the coast of Maryland and Virginia. Most of them make their home on Assateague island on a wildlife refuge.


By United States Coast Guard, PA2 Christopher Evanson [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By United States Coast Guard, PA2 Christopher Evanson [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The ponies are looked after by the Chincoteague fire department. The Chincoteague fire department rounds up the phones the last weekend in July and they swim them across the channel between the islands. The ponies are herded down the main street in Chincoteague to a pen. The young ponies are sold. The money from the sale helps pay for the care of the ponies. The ponies that are left are taken back to the island.


By dbking (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_7901) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By dbking (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_7901) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Chincoteague/Assateague ponies are 12 hands tall. They are just about any color. Pinto is the most common. They are intelligent and can be very stubborn. If they are properly trained they will make good riding ponies.

No one really knows how they got to the island. Some say a boat that had Moorish ponies on board that came from North Africa and was going to Peru shipwrecked and the ponies swam to the island. The ponies were discovered on the island in the 1700s and they crossed Shetland and Welsh ponies with the native ponies. Arabian blood was added later.


Connemara Pony

By Satu Pitkänen (Own work (own photo)) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Satu Pitkänen (Own work (own photo)) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

According to legend, the Connemara pony originated from Spanish horses. In 1588 ships wrecked on the coast of western Ireland. There were Spanish horses on the ships and they were rescued. It is believed that some of the Spanish horses were bred to the native horses. In the 1700s Thoroughbred and Arabian blood were added. The Connemara pony was turned out in harsh weather on poor pasture and only the strong will survive and this developed a very strong breed of ponies.

The Connemara pony belongs to the mountain and moorland group of ponies. They originated in western Ireland in Connaught county. The Connemara pony has been used to improve the Irish hunter.

The Connemara pony is 12.2 to 14.2 hands tall. They are small but make great jumpers and hunters. They are also good at dressage and distance riding. At first, they were the dun color which is now very rare. They are now found in black, gray, brown and bay colors.


By Olaf K. (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Olaf K. (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Connemara pony as a pure breed became threatened because they were crossed with other horses alive. Only the strongest survived and these ponies were used to save the Connemara pony breed.

nd ponies. Many of them were kept in stables and many inferior ponies survived. There were about a dozen good quality Connemara ponies chosen in the 1900s and they were turned loose in the wild to live. Only the strongest survived and they were used to save the Connemara pony breed.


Dales Pony

By No machine-readable author provided. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By No machine-readable author provided. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Dales pony is a native of England. Their background is the same as the Fell pony. The Dales and Fell pony are from North Yorkshire, Durham and Northumberland, England. The Dales pony started with the Friesian horse in Roman times. For years the Dales pony was used as a pack animal because of their great strength and they were so sure footed. Some of them were used in the mines to haul out coal and lead. They were also used on the farms in the north because the terrain was too rough for the large draft horses.

It is believed the Dales pony originated from the Celtic pony. The ponies were crossed with the Friesian during Roman times. They were later crossed with the Welsh pony to make them better for farm work.

The Dales pony s 14 hands tall. They have a thick tail and mane. They have feathering around their ankles. They can carry 225 pounds and pull 2,000 pounds.

Faroe Pone

By Aslnes at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Aslnes at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Faroe pony is said to be very strong and rare. It is believed they are near extinction. The Faroe pony, Danish pony, and Faronese Island Horse are all names for the same pony breed. They are a small pony being 150cm to 125cm tall. They are ponies because of their size but people on the Faroe Islands call them horses because they are so strong. They are usually red, brown and black in color. They are very adaptable, friendly and surefooted. The Faroe pony has three gaits which are the walk, trot, and canter.

At one time the Faroe pony was used to pull heavy loads and do farm work. When they are not working they are released in mountain areas. This pony s now used as children s riding ponies.

They have lived on the Faroe Islands for hundreds of years. There were only 5 or 6 Faroe ponies left in the 1960s. The reason for this was that so many of them had been exported to work in the United Kingdoms mines. There was an effort made to save them and their numbers have increased to over 50. They are not being exported at this time and the numbers keep increasing.


Dartmoor Pony

By Own Herby talk thyme (self-made by Herby) [GFDL (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Own Herby talk thyme (self-made by Herby) [GFDL (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

Another one of Britain's “mountain and moorlands” ponies is the Dartmoor pony. They are from the Dart River area. It is believed they are descended from horses brought to Britain before the Normans invaded. They are good riding ponies when they are trained at a young age. They make good riding and how ponies.

The Dartmoor pony breeds in the wild. They are 12.2 hands tall. They are usually brown, black, and bay in color.


By Markles55 (originally posted to Flickr as PONY) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Markles55 (originally posted to Flickr as PONY) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons | Source

The Dartmoor pony lives in Devon, England near the Dart river. They are threatened as a breed because other pony breed have been introduced so they would be smaller. They wanted the ponies small so they could be used in the mines.

The Dartmoor pony breed was influenced by the Welsh pony, Thoroughbred and Arabian horse breeds.






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    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      21 months ago from United Kingdom

      'Misty of Chincoteague'. How I loved that book. It was the first time I realized that Shetlands weren't the only ponies in the world. I'm enjoying this series of pony articles. I never knew there were so many.

    • craftybegonia profile image

      craftybegonia 

      22 months ago from Southwestern, United States

      So many different breeds of horses! I have only been on a horse once in my life. I was a year old and on the front of the horse, being held by a relative of mine. I know because a photo was taken. I have never ridden a horse like a regular rider, would like to, some day...they are such beautiful and intelligent animals! Thank you for sharing your knowledge of them.

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