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Roosters Make Good Pets

Updated on April 24, 2011

Many folks name their pet roosters Chanticleer after the famous character in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.  If you like the sound, they do seem to sing ("Chanticleer" means "clear singing"), and they don't only crow in the morning.  They are gentle pets that find their own food on the lawn.  They wander busily, eating bugs and scratching out dirt mounds left by the moles.  Occasionally, like all chickens, your rooster will want to take a dirt bath.  This is natural and is amusing to observe.

Feeding

Your rooster will need some calcium shell supplement once a week. A handful of commercial feed per day will make sure his vitamin needs are met, although chickens love table scraps and will eat almost anything you give them. They are a good way to recycle leftover food, which ends up as ground-enriching manure. They keep the grass short if you have several of them (too many in a small enough enclosure and the grass will vanish altogether), although I wouldn't recommend several roosters in the same fenced yard or you will end up with a fight. If your rooster is lonely you'll have to buy a few hens.

Mean Roosters

Roosters do have spurs, and occasionally they have been known to attack people, but this is usually only if the bird has been provoked. Occasionally they will also fly at children, who are intimidated by this if they are unfamiliar with the animals. A knowledgeable adult will be able to instruct the child in the right way to handle these fine, feathery creatures. Most roosters will come around to your point of view and stop being bossy if you stand your ground and don't let them bully you. Do not strike or harm the birds; simply pick them up. If you hold a rooster with his wings closed and his feet are off the ground there is very little he can do about it. Stroke his feathers with your hand, and talk to him softly.  After doing this a few times the birds will come to see that you are not going to harm them, and that you are too big to bully anyway.

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    • Silver Poet profile imageAUTHOR

      Silver Poet 

      6 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      Friendlybean:

      Wear leather gloves to avoid being bitten. Spend a lot of time with your rooster and he will probably calm down. Approach him slowly, then pause and stand perfectly still. Throw a little corn on the ground, and remain still. Let him come to you and let him see that you are no threat to him. If you are persistent you will win him over.

      As to picking him up, if he lets you get close enough to stand right behind him, this always worked for me: I would quickly and gently place both hands over both the chicken's wings (this worked for hens also) and lift it off the ground. With the wings held against the chicken's body and unable to move, and the feet off the ground, he's pretty much helpless. Talk calmly to him to reassure him that you're not a hungry fox!

    • profile image

      freindlybean 

      6 years ago

      i got a english rooster yesterday but im not sure how to carry a rooster or aproach to get it ...i think its going to bite me :/ any advice?

    • Silver Poet profile imageAUTHOR

      Silver Poet 

      6 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      Mez: I'm glad you're having fun with your rooster!

      Ginger: It is probably not too late. If I were taming a rooster like yours there are several ways to go about it. One way would be to scatter food in a wide (like ten feet) circle around yourself, and then stand perfectly still like a statue, allowing the rooster to come closer and closer to you as it eats up the food you've scattered. Eventually if you do this every day, you can try putting some food in your gloved hand and again stand still like a statue, and see if it will approach and eat from your hand. I have had this work for both chickens and ducks that I purchased as adults. Good luck!

    • profile image

      Ginger 

      6 years ago

      I accidently ended up with a rooster. Don't ask why and i live in the city. He likes walking around the house & hanging out in my backyard but he wont let me near him I would like to carry him but I guess he has never had a human touch him. What can I do to trust me? Or is it too late?

    • profile image

      Mez 

      6 years ago

      I have a little pet rooster. I sometimes let him out to wonder because i haven't built a nice coop for him yet. he loves it so much that i have to run after him every time to put him back in his coop. but once in my arms he is the cutest and nicest pet ever!! i can even make him sleep upside down like a baby and play with his legs for hours!! his legs are up in the air when he sleeps like that. he even stand still and lets me touch him when he is in his coop...but he loves freedom a little bit too much lol and yes i am endlessly fascinated when i watch him take dust baths and i have loads of scratches on my right hand to prove he stands there a lot. my dad said i should get one of those arm guards they have for eagles lol i LOVE my rooster!!! :))

    • Silver Poet profile imageAUTHOR

      Silver Poet 

      6 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      Rain, thanks for your comment.

      I personally have never met a rooster I couldn't handle, but there may be exceptions. It's partly about attitude and body language. Are you confident? Do you walk tall? If he runs at you, do you run towards him and show him you're not afraid? These things have been found to be helpful. Roosters are easy to bluff. They're all show and no real substance. After all, a human being is so very much larger than a rooster! I always wore long PVC boots and leather gloves to feed all the animals, and nothing as small as a rooster could really do too much--the boots are impervious to their spurs, and the gloves help protect you from their beaks if you want to feed them corn from your hand.

    • profile image

      Rain. 

      6 years ago

      I am 15 and also have a Rooster. But I have done what you said above but I cannot get him to stop attacking me. Though I have never hit him, if I carry a weapon and let him see it, he only tries to attack me when my back is turned. If you would like to help me please email me at :

      WHITEROSE4275@yahoo.com

    • Silver Poet profile imageAUTHOR

      Silver Poet 

      8 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      Thanks for your comment, Cindy. A rooster's strut is amusing to watch, and I'm glad you had the opportunity to own one.

    • profile image

      Cindy 

      8 years ago

      Some breeds are gentler than others, but the very best pet I ever had (and I have had many) was a Silkie rooster who lived in the house. He was SO smart and affectionate... I love chickens in general, but roosters also have the glint-in-the-eye attitude! They will dance for you, and they are fine dancers.

    • Silver Poet profile imageAUTHOR

      Silver Poet 

      8 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

      yvonne: I'm afraid the only thing you can do is to separate the rooster from the duck.

    • profile image

      yvonne 

      8 years ago

      My rooster and hen was raised right along with a duck. The duck thinks she is a chicken and the rooster is constantly mating with the duck, how do i stop it. she was a crested duck and he pulled all her hair on top out.

    • Michael Shane profile image

      Michael Shane 

      8 years ago from Gadsden, Alabama

      Cool hub! I did one on how to raise a rooster the proper way & to avoid making it aggressive.....

    • stars439 profile image

      stars439 

      8 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

      Great hub. My family use to love to raise chickens when we were young. It is delightful to pick up fresh eggs in a nice chicken yard. I miss those good old days. Maybe I will build a nice little pen again someday. God Bless.

    • profile image

      Andrea 

      8 years ago

      so true..roosters are very nice animals indeed..i have one as a pet, an accidental pet..he's the sweetest..likes to take his nap in my arms like a baby...

    • Rebecca E. profile image

      Rebecca E. 

      8 years ago from Canada

      good advice, reminds me of being on the family farm.

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