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Simple and Convenient Chicken Coop Designs

Updated on April 1, 2013

I have searched, but cannot find any chicken coops that are similar to mine. They are simple, convenient, and they don't take up space (ground-wise). I have two chicken coops with altered designs, but still have the same uniqueness that separates them from all other coops. Keep in mind these are for pet chickens and not so much livestock.

The chicken coop on the right (the picture above and below) is really meant to house one large pet chicken, but I have seen smaller chickens share the same space with the Barred Rock chicken above (or a small one would roost on the perch).

The right coop is the only coop with a latch, but it is for me to check on her. There are no ramps, no latches to prevent predators, and no chicken wire. This is why my chicken coops are unique and practical. Without latches, the birds are free to go in and out whenever they please by flying up to their homes. In the image above, the Barred Rock chicken will fly up on the white table before flying into her home. The little rooster in the left coop sometimes uses the stumps, but I have seen him fly straight up into his home before. His coop can house probably as many as ten chickens of his size (he's a Serama- tiny thing).

The table and stumps are too far away from the coops for racoons and opossums to get to. With this in mind, I need not worry about messing with ramps or closing any doors. The chickens are happy because they don't have to wait for me in order to get out in the morning, and I can be away in the evening and not worry about my chickens. I have had these two for two years (during the warm seasons) and there's never been a problem.

The designs of my chicken coops are the simplest I have found. I have seen a lot of neat, creative homes for chickens, but if you only have a handful and you want to keep it small and simple, this is what you want to build. Mine are drilled into the back of my garage and I had them painted the same color for the sake of attractiveness. It did not take too long to build, although the one on the left needed some manpower in order to lift it up to that height. I used plywood for material. The bottom of the coops are a little over four feet off the ground. Make sure there isn't a way for vermin to climb up to the coops.


Interior of left coop.
Interior of left coop.

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    • mariekbloch profile imageAUTHOR

      mariekbloch 

      7 years ago

      Thanks Simone. I couldn't remember the steps I had to take to create these (I had a lot of help from friends who like doing these kind of projects). For anyone who is thinking of duplicating my coops, I think the pics show enough detail to give people an idea. Thanks for the comment!

    • Simone Smith profile image

      Simone Haruko Smith 

      7 years ago from San Francisco

      I've never seen this design either, and I've seen my fair share of coops! This is very cool. You should write a guide on how to make one!

    • mariekbloch profile imageAUTHOR

      mariekbloch 

      7 years ago

      To tsadjatko, my chickens are pretty fast without a third leg, or at least the little rooster is. It would be pretty freaky. Cute joke.

    • mariekbloch profile imageAUTHOR

      mariekbloch 

      7 years ago

      To Agnes Penn, my chickens technically belong to a friend of a friend who raises these chickens on his farm. Because he has so many, he gives these two to me whenever spring comes and by the end of fall I give them back to him. I suppose a heater could be attached, but they would not be able walk around. Maybe if a person could spare their garage or if they do have a barn, they could drill these coops on the inside walls.

      Good question.

    • tsadjatko profile image

      7 years ago from now on

      Great info! Love those chickens!

      A man was driving down a country road one day at 45 miles per hour when suddenly he noticed a 3-legged chicken running at the same speed beside his truck.

      Though he thought this odd, the man decided to speed up so he wouldn't cause an accident with the chicken.

      The man sped up to 55 miles per hour, but low and behold, so did the 3-legged chicken.

      The man then sped up to 65 miles per hour only to again be equaled in speed by the 3-legged chicken.

      As the man watched in amazement, the chicken suddenly made a sharp left turn and took off down a side road toward a small farm.

      The man quickly also made the left turn and followed the chicken to the small farm, parking out front.

      Looking around the man found the farmer around back in the midst of many 3-legged chickens.

      After greeting the farmer, the man asked him why he was raising 3-legged chickens.

      "Well we figure," said the farmer, "that with an average family of 3 people, only 2 can have a chicken leg with an average chicken. But with a three legged chicken, each member of the family can enjoy a chicken leg of their own."

      "That's pretty wise," said the man, who then asked "Well how do your 3-legged chickens taste?"

      "I don't know," said the farmer. "We've never been able to catch one."

    • Agnes Penn profile image

      Maria del Pilar Perez 

      7 years ago from Nicholson, Pennsylvania, USA

      Excellent idea! I'm wondering if you have to deal with cold temperatures in the winter.

    • mariekbloch profile imageAUTHOR

      mariekbloch 

      7 years ago

      Thank you. Because they are pet chickens, I give them special attention and make sure they eat a lot of bugs around the yard. They should be very healthy. Thanks for the comment.

    • naturegirl7 profile image

      Yvonne L. B. 

      7 years ago from South Louisiana

      Very interesting design. I wish I could do something similar, but I live in the country and have to juggle between my chickens and my dogs being out at different times.

      They look good for backyard chickens, though.

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