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Some Extinct Dog Breeds

Updated on May 27, 2016

The Extinct Tahltan Bear Dog

Tahltan Bear Dog Sketch2  By Pharaoh Hound
Tahltan Bear Dog Sketch2 By Pharaoh Hound | Source

Canada was at one time the home of the now extinct Tahltan Bear Dog. They were used for hunting black bears and Grizzles. They were small dog being bigger than a fox. They would tease and keep the bears busy until the native hunters got there to kill the bears with their spears.

The Tahltan Bear dogs were the dogs of the Tahltan native that lived in British Columbia, Canada. The Tahltan natives killed the bears and traded the skins for things they need. When bear shins were not popular any more doe dog's numbers decreased and they soon become extinct.


The Bichon Frise Decendent of the Bichon Tenerife

Bichon Frise by Sannse CC BY-SA 3.0
Bichon Frise by Sannse CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Bardino Majorero was a large dog that resembled a wolf. The coat was brindled grayish green and medium long. They were a very old breed and they became in the 1800s. They were natives of the Canary Islands.

The Perro de Presa Canano is related to the Bardino Majorero.

The Bardino Majorero was used for many jobs. They were used for herding and as guard dogs. They were found all over the Canary Islands but there was more of them on the Fuertevintura Island.

When the mastiff type dogs came to the Canary Islands the pure Bardino Majorero numbers decreased and they were considered extinct by the 1800s.


The Extinct Bichon Tenerife

The Bichon Tenerife dog was small and their tail curled over their back. They had fluffy soft fur.

The Bichon Tenerife came about in the 1500s and disappeared in the 1700s. They made their home on the Canary Island of Tenerife. It is believed that their ancestors were brought to Tenerife Island in the 1500s by the Spanish.



Decendents of the Extinct Blanquito de la Habana Dog

Picture by Andrey CC BY-SA 2.0
Picture by Andrey CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Extinct Blanquito de la Habana Dog

The Blanquito de la Habana dog was small. Like so many dogs of this type they carried their tail curled over their back.

They were first seen in the 1500s and were gone by the 1800s. They were natives of Cuba. It is believed the Spanish brought their ancestors to Cuba in the 1500s. It is believed the Italians brought the Maltese and Bolenee to Cuba.


The Extinct Bullenbeisser Dog

By Falaido CCO Public Domain
By Falaido CCO Public Domain | Source

The Bullenbeisser dog was a large mastiff type dog. They were used in the sport of bull baiting. They were also used to hunt wild boar. The Bullenbeisser dog would hold down the game until the hunter came and then the dog would grab the animals nose and hang on until the hunter killed it.

The Bullenbeisser dog breed goes back to the 10th century in Germany. Their ancestress were the mastiff that lived back in the Holy Roman Empire time. They were not as popular as the Brabantery and the Danzinger which were breeds that lived at the same time.

In the 1870s the Boxer was developed by crossing the Bullenbeisser with the Old English Bulldog. The Bullishness numbers decreased and they were gone by the mid 1940s.


The Extinct Coton de Reunion

By SunWukong Attribution  Share Alike 3.0
By SunWukong Attribution Share Alike 3.0 | Source

The Coton de Reunion made its home in the Indian Ocean on Reunion. They were a small dog. It is believed the Coton de Reunion came to Reunion with the French.

Reunion was a very important commercial place until 1869 when the Suez Canal was opened. After the Suez Canal opened the Coton de Reunion was no longer popular and eventually became extinct as a breed.


Image of Tesem dog from grave of Intel ii 2065BC
Image of Tesem dog from grave of Intel ii 2065BC | Source

The Tesem dog was kept by the ancient Egyptians and was used for hunting, guard dogs and companion dogs. Many people think the Africanis and Basenji are descendants of the Tesem dog.

Many people believe they were used to develop the sight hound breeds. The Tesem dog has been portrayed on many Egyptian artifacts. The Egyptians mummified the Tesem dog and put them in their master's tomb when they died.





The Extinct Bardino Majororo

By Anja Griesand 000000cc 000000000000000000000000000000000000000000by 3.0
By Anja Griesand 000000cc 000000000000000000000000000000000000000000by 3.0 | Source

The Bardino Majorero was a large dog that resembled a wolf. The coat was brindled grayish green and medium long. They were a very old breed and they became in the 1800s. They were natives of the Canary Islands.

The Perro de Presa Canano is related to the Bardino Majorero.

The Bardino Majorero was used for many jobs. They were used for herding and as guard dogs. They were found all over the Canary Islands but there was more of them on the Fuertevintura Island.

When the mastiff type dogs came to the Canary Islands the pure Bardino Majorero numbers decreased and they were considered extinct by the 1800s.


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    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      24 months ago from California

      Thanks It is said so many dog breeds are now gone.

    • ladyguitarpicker profile image

      stella vadakin 

      24 months ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

      Hi, I had a dog that looked a lot like the Bardino. I had him about 10 years, he was a great watchdog. The vet had no idea what he was, he just moved in one day so I kept him. Great hub. Stella

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      Shyron E Shenko Thanks for comment and glad you liked it.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 

      2 years ago from Texas

      Norma, I love your pictures and your hub is really interesting.

      Blessings my friend

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      Thanks. It is to bad they are all gone now.

    • Sharyn's Slant profile image

      Sharon Smith 

      2 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA

      Wow, very interesting. The Bardino Majororo reminds me of a dog that I fostered last year. Cute!

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