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The Faces Behind That Fur You Wear

Updated on October 14, 2014
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Raccoon Dog.  It's time is up.   It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.White minks in cages awaiting the inevitable.Dog in China.   It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.Raccoon Dog pupsRaccoon Dog adult.  It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.Caged FoxThe truth nobody wants to see.What if?Clubbing continues in Canada, despite bans.Red Lobster restaurant chain buys more Canadaian seafood than any other U.S. wholesale customer and can do more to end the $16 million Canadian seal hunt than any other company.
Raccoon Dog.  It's time is up.   It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.
Raccoon Dog. It's time is up. It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China. You just don't buy them.
White minks in cages awaiting the inevitable.
White minks in cages awaiting the inevitable.
Dog in China.   It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.
Dog in China. It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China. You just don't buy them.
Raccoon Dog pups
Raccoon Dog pups
Raccoon Dog adult.  It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China.  You just don't buy them.
Raccoon Dog adult. It's not difficult to boycott products Made in China. You just don't buy them.
Caged Fox
Caged Fox
The truth nobody wants to see.
The truth nobody wants to see.
What if?
What if?
Clubbing continues in Canada, despite bans.
Clubbing continues in Canada, despite bans.
Red Lobster restaurant chain buys more Canadaian seafood than any other U.S. wholesale customer and can do more to end the $16 million Canadian seal hunt than any other company.
Red Lobster restaurant chain buys more Canadaian seafood than any other U.S. wholesale customer and can do more to end the $16 million Canadian seal hunt than any other company.

The Ugly Truth Behind the Fur Industry

Did you know that in China alone, one million and a half Raccoon Dogs (and that's not counting the foxes, dogs and cats) are killed every year in the most barbaric ways you can imagine; skinned alive just for the sake of fur?

The Raccoon Dogs seem to get the worst of it although I don't understand why, since these "dogs" are incredibly docile creatures, where the only violence they will ever show is their vain attempts at escaping their crowded cages in these horrific fur farms.

Because no laws exist in China against animal cruelty, there dangles the question of the ethics regarding life in general. Not all Chinese people agree with the fur trade, some even protest. But why would their own country listen to them when it's all about supply and demand coming from places like the U.S. and Canada?

Their treatment of these helpless animals is bad enough. Their excuses of it being their culture, or that they eat dogs and cats to survive is an incredible insult to the intelligence of anyone who is able to read this. Cruelty to animals for the sake of fashion just doesn't need to exist anymore. We are way more advanced than the cavemen who needed it to clothe themselves.

Wearing a fashionable coat or fur trimmed collar on that jacket, purse or boots all for the sake of making money for a designer who has absolutely no empathy to the cruelty of what these poor helpless animals had to endure, leaves absolutely no excuse to hide behind, nor should it for anyone who respects life.

We can produce faux furs completely out of man-made fibers which look and feel just as good as real furs. But that would mean the fur farms lose money and the designers don't get to put those fancy hats on their models and sell them for $2,000. It all comes down to money. And business is money, I get it. But how much is it worth really?

In Australia, they were making UGG boots with fur that came from these China farms. The fur was from the Raccoon Dog and labeled as "faux" or wool. But they were Raccoon Dogs. When some animal rights groups got together and made some noise, The Humane Society International banned this activity and now many department stores in Australia no longer will do business with the China Fur Trade. This all happened within one year, so it is very possible to get this fixed.

A quick look at these farms will sicken you just by the pictures alone. The video attached in the PETA link will give you nightmares. There's just no other way to say it. You will not eat the same way again or look at another animal without picturing it without its skin or frantically taking its last breath. It's sad and disgusting and very traumatizing.

They cram as many animals as they can into tiny cages, usually made for 20 animals but easily you can see sometimes twice as much in one cage. Their screams and biting at the cage to get out go ignored as they get to sit and watch these poor animals taken out one at a time, skinned alive and left there in a heap to die, some still breathing, are able to get up on all fours, like Bambi, fumbling with bloody carcass, eyes shocked and glaring into a world that ended their life for what, a hat? A pair of boots? A fur around someones neck or some celebrity who thought wearing fox would be "cool"? Congratulations on that. You don't look any better. You look disgusting wearing some dead animal on you. And the fact that you wear it, makes me question your morality.

Every store that disagrees with banning fur from their stores or designers who refuse to stop funding these farms should be forced to have television screens on their walls, showing exactly where these furs come from and what they did to get it. If they really don't care, then why wouldn't they want the truth to be shown? It's like those tobacco commercials. Nobody wants the truth to be shown because the fact is, some people really don't know the truth. And those that do know, are living in denial of what really goes on in the rest of the world. The rest of the, just don't care.

It's really so easy. This is our planet. And like I mentioned in another hub I wrote about dogs and cats being used as shark bait, money controls the monster that we keep complaining about. The more we feed it, the more harm it causes. If our dollar wasn't valuable, then there wouldn't be demand for it. Stop doing business with countries that do not respect the lives of animals. Stop donating to their cause.

In 2010, the U.S. tightened its ban so that any fur entering the country must be labeled, no matter the size, species or land of origin. But of course the Chinese found a way around that by dying dog or cat fur in pinks or blues and selling them as "faux" fur trims for jackets or gloves, boots, etc.

When it got a little harder for their furs to enter without scrutiny, they started doing business with Canada. Remember Canada? That's where they club the seals for their fur. Yes, they still do that. The only requirement that Canada allows under it's "watchful" eye of importing fur is that the label be labeled "fur". Yes, that's it. Just fur. It doesn't matter what kind or where or how. That's good enough for them. And they wonder why they are being picked on by the animal rights activists.

Do you have dog or cat fur in your closet? Here are some tips to find out how:

Look at the pelts. If they are small pieces sewn together to make one piece, where colors don't match, fur going one direction and another, is a good clue.

Sometimes you can see a black fur with white line, obviously a cat. The top is fine and silky with bottom a little rough, that's a cat.

Domestic cat and rabbit are similar looking but the rabbit's fur is not as shiny and is usually only one color. Remember rabbits don't have stripes or spots. Cats do.

Can you tell the difference between Faux and Real Fur?

Since the Raccoon Dog seem to be the most popular in the fur trade right now, here's a quick guide on how you can tell the difference;

1. Look at the base. Fake fur has threaded backing, all sewn into the fur. Real fur is the actual fur of the animal with its real skin, which was dyed. There won't be need for threading. It's already attached.

2. Real animal fur tapers into a point. That means if you look at the very tip of the fur hair, it will look like a sewing needle, coming to an extreme point on the end, where faux fur won't do that. It will be blunt.

3. This one is only if you already own a piece. Don't do this at the store. Simply burn a bit of the hair. Real fur smells like human hair when burned. Faux fur will not.

If you own a piece of fur and in all good conscience can't wear it, the Humane Society, along with PETA have solutions for you. Please visit their websites for more information but some will take them as donations to warm animal babies and rehabs for the injured.

If you are ready to make a difference in this world, remember you do count, just like your vote does. We can change the world, one person at a time.

If you are interested in other stories about cruelty of animals, read my other hub on dogs and cats being used as shark bait.

http://rosanamodugno.hubpages.com/hub/French-Reunion-Island-Still-Using-Dogs-and-Cats-as-Shark-Bait


Woody Harrelson Speaks Out Against the Fur Industry

Comments

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  • Rosana Modugno profile imageAUTHOR

    Rosana Modugno 

    4 years ago from 10th Kingdom

    Rosie,

    Woody's video is not what you think. He uses stuffed animals to get his message across, so it won't offend viewers. :)

  • Rosie writes profile image

    Rosie writes 

    4 years ago from Virginia

    This is an incredibly well-written article. It may get more attention if you break the text up and add subtitles. I cannot even bring myself to watch the video as I know it will replay in my head over and over again. You have made so many valid points as to why such barbaric treatment should not even exist. I am sickened by these acts. Thanks for bringing this topic to everyone's attention - people need to see this.

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