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The History and Stories of Grizzlies

Updated on January 22, 2011

History and Stories of the Grizzly bear

The North American Grizzly is a subspecies of the brown bear, once widespread in Russia and North America. The North American population is vulnerable. Its range has become restricted mainly to the Rocky Mountains with a population of 13,000; once upon a time, bears ruled North America.

The Grizzly is characterized by the high shoulder hump, his height is up to 1.5 m (5 ft.) and a weight of 500 kg (1,100 lb.) is not uncommon in recent times. The greatest weight of a Grizzly ever recorded was 2400 pounds. Grizzly eats a variety of things, from fish to tubers and berries. They will also eat also other animals as bear seek any opportunities’ to eat almost everything except granite. Grizzly young are very small at birth, weigh 400 g (14 oz.) or less. The greatest danger for clubs is male Grizzly attacks, some researchers say that about 50% of the clubs are killed by males for reason they want to mate again sooner with the females. The cubs stay with there mother usually 2 or 3 years and cubs are born late in the winter or early spring. Mother bears ban together when fishing at the Salmon River banks, all the Cubs play together wail Mothers fish. When the time comes to go back to the den, clubs get mixed up with the wrong Mother, yet when they return to fishing the next day Mothers exchange back their own cubs.

Grizzlies mainly avoid contact with humans, they are sometimes unpredictable and should be given plenty of room; every year, bears maul or kill humans. I encounter a Grizzly and cub in BC Canada and stayed down wind and viewed from a far. These bear can move very quickly, even horses find it difficult to evade a rushing grizzly. The longest time a human has survived living with Grizzlies is 13 summers, then this California man and his girlfriend were eaten by an old male Grizzly

Many people wonder who would win in a fight between a large cat and a large bear. In the early 1800s a fight was stage between a 2000 pound Grizzly and the big cat, a lion weighting at 380 pounds, (Tigers can weight up to 600 pound). After fight was over, the bear easily won, the fight was like a cat battling a rat. Human fights are stage in weight class due to larger human are stronger than lighter weight. In nature, one to one battles with mixed predator species, weight makes a big difference with odd exceptions. A large bear general weights three times greater than a large cat and can break its back from the power of his paws.

There has been very powerful people who have asked, why not wipe out all of these dangerous species of bears, Just because over financial reasons in protecting bears. Luckily we have found many more financial reasons to keep bears.

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    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      The vast majority of my intimate predator encounters are most loving. Like my one pound ferret who freaks many people out, yet she is a constant loving clown.

    • pennyofheaven profile image

      pennyofheaven 

      7 years ago from New Zealand

      Awww so cute. My goodness what is it with you and animals? Monkeys, bears haha.

    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      In the first around the world hub, I had brief on it. From what I have read, the worst thing that can happen to you is to be trapped between a Mother Black bear and her cub. It actually happened to me working at a hotel, wail talking out the garbage. I was afraid I was going to have to have hand to paw combat with Mom within this tiny garbage cabin; I took a few garbage lids and threw it at her a growled as loud as I could. Mom crushed through the wall and ran like hell; her cub ran passes me and went chasing after his Mom, unexpectedly.

    • pennyofheaven profile image

      pennyofheaven 

      7 years ago from New Zealand

      Oh my goodness, they get in your garbage can???? It is truly a strange and marvelous world beyond our own!

    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      In BC Canada there more bears than anywhere in the world. I was hiking and by accident I saw Grizzly and he did not know I was there, due to Grizzly poor eye sight and being down wind. I do respect their need for a lot of territory to survive and they can be very dangerous. Black bears I have to confront them a few dozen times because they rip my garbage apart at my home.

    • pennyofheaven profile image

      pennyofheaven 

      7 years ago from New Zealand

      Oh must be scary having to confront a grizzly based on those facts. I wonder if we have taken too much of their natural habitat away from them? Would be nice to be able to live in the wild respecting their space. Perhaps they would respect ours unless we are their natural food source? If we are then perhaps they need their own space period! Thanks for the very informative hub!

    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      Endangered Species Act. say now there are, 1,200 to 1,400 grizzlies estimated that live in the United States. You’re lucky to be in an area that has them, it seem stupid to put honey on a little girl face for a wild animal to eat up. Alot people feed bears at the side of the road too.

      I travel around the world building sand castles and meet a lot of crazy people. This lady had an act with a polar bears and Grizzly bear along with tigers and lions. I asked her what were more dangerous bears or cats. She said bears because cats give all kinds of signs on how they are thinking.

    • Wintermyst profile image

      Wintermyst 

      7 years ago

      I live in a part of Montana where our winters are that long. It is a good thing the bear got scared and ran or rode the bike (heh). I am about an hour from Yellowstone, so we have alot of bear stories. Years ago some guy took his two year old daughter, smeared honey on her face and took pictures as a grizzly bear licked it off. He was banned from the park for life. We also have had people attacked by moose and a couple of buck deer. It was so bad one year with grizzly attacks that the newspapers state wide wrote an article on how to tell if a grizzly is about to attack and what to do. I think everyone wanting to go to Yellowstone should read it.

    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      Most Grizzlies live in far north where the winter is 7 months long, so half of their diet is meat. There is more Black bear attacks, although confronting a grizzly is more dangerous. I met 2 bicyclists tenting in the woods, and one of the bikes was ruin. A black bear went into their tent going after their food, the guys freaked, it scared the bear, and the one guy told me, it looked like the bear got on his bike and was rode it down the hill. I'm sure the guy was half asleep when he saw it,

    • Wintermyst profile image

      Wintermyst 

      7 years ago

      Well maybe running in a zig zag fashion then? God I bet he was scared to death. I am glad all he got was a broken arm. We have actually had them go into tents here and drag people out of them and eat them. They lied to us when we were in grade school, they taught us grizzlies ate berries and stuff, they never mentioned eating meat. This was in the 60's of course so alot has changed. I was never taught about a Pangea either because when I was going to school it didn't have a name. I had to wait until my kids went to school and I overheard them talking about it before I even knew the continent had been named.

    • Castlepaloma profile imageAUTHOR

      Castlepaloma 

      7 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      I met a guy and I asked him how he broke his arm. He told me, he was being chased by a Grizzly bear down a hill and he jump off the path and broke his arm on a rock. He found out later, the bear was not chasing him; the bear could not stop himself. It could depend on what kind of hill and how steep the hill is.

    • Wintermyst profile image

      Wintermyst 

      7 years ago

      An American Indian told me once if I ever ran into a grizzly to run as fast as I could downhill, their back legs are shorter and it will cause them to somersault. I never forgot what he told me. Thankfully, I have yet to run into one and I live in a state that has them. Good informational peice.

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