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The Top 10 Deadliest Cobras in the World

Updated on September 21, 2020
Larry Slawson profile image

Larry Slawson received his Master's Degree from UNC Charlotte. He has a keen interest in reptiles, insects, and arachnids.

The Top 10 Deadliest Cobras in the World.
The Top 10 Deadliest Cobras in the World.

The World's Deadliest Cobra Species

Throughout the world, there exists a number of cobra species capable of inflicting serious harm (or death) on the human population at large. From the samar cobra to the caspian cobra, this article examines the 10 deadliest cobras in the world, and ranks each specimen according to their potential for causing (and inflicting) fatal bites.

Selection Criteria

In order to rank the world’s deadliest cobras, a number of basic criteria was necessary for the extents and purposes of this work. First and foremost, each of the cobras selected are ranked according to the overall potency of their venom in relation to animals and humans. Second, overall aggression and the number of bites inflicted (annually) by these snakes is also considered. This is important for the ranking process, as some less-venomous cobras are known to attack humans more frequently than their highly-venomous counterparts.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, average fatality rates (combined with the average amount of time between bite and death) is also considered, with the assumption that no medical treatment was sought by the victim. This final criteria is crucial for this study, as a number of antivenoms exist to counteract most cobra bites. Assuming that no medical treatment was provided allows for better insight into the overall toxicity and potency of each cobra’s venom.

While imperfect, the author believes that each of these criteria offers the best means for ranking the world’s deadliest cobras.

The deadly samar cobra.
The deadly samar cobra. | Source

10. Samar Cobra (Naja samarensis)

  • Average Size: 1.4 meters
  • Geographical Range: Southern Philippines (Visayas and Mindanao Islands)
  • Conservation Status: “Least Concern” (Population Stable)

The samar cobra is a species of highly venomous cobra from the Elapidae family of snakes. Growing upwards of 1.4 meters in length (at maturity), the snake is a relatively large species known to inhabit much of the southern regions of the Philippines. Apart from their wide hoods, the samar cobra can be easily identified by their black and yellow coloration that occasionally takes on a greenish hue. They are also classified as a “spitting cobra” species with the ability to spray large quantities of venom into the air with pinpoint accuracy. As a result, this species is incredibly dangerous to humans, and should be avoided by onlookers whenever possible.

Within the Southern Philippines, the samar cobra can be found in a variety of habitats. This includes mountainous terrain, jungle, agricultural fields, as well as the area’s tropical plains. These areas offer the samar cobra an abundant source of prey, including frogs, lizards, various reptiles, birds, and small rodents (their primary source of food).

Did You Know?

The samar cobra is an extremely aggressive species. In fact, the snake is known to strike its victims with little provocation, resulting in a life-threatening bite that carries a high fatality rate.

Samar Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The samar cobra’s venom is comprised of a powerful series of neurotoxins with cytotoxic properties. Following envenomation, symptoms usually begin rapidly as the venom attacks the victim’s central nervous system and lungs. Early symptoms include dizziness, muscle weakness, excessive bleeding, as well as necrosis of the bite site. As the venom progresses throughout the bloodstream, difficulties with breathing tend to occur and are followed by complete paralysis of the respiratory system. Without medical treatment, fatalities are common.

Rapid medical care is necessary to prevent death. Treatment for a samar cobra bite usually involves the administering of antivenom, along with palliative care and intravenous fluids (to maintain hydration and electrolyte balance). And while treatment is usually effective for most victims, long-term injuries and complications are common as the samar cobra’s venom tends to destroy skin and muscle tissue, resulting in severe pain and discomfort.

An Egyptian cobra poised to strike.
An Egyptian cobra poised to strike. | Source

9. Egyptian Cobra (Naja haje)

  • Average Size: 1.4 meters (4.6 feet)
  • Geographical Range: Northern and Western Africa
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (Insufficient Data)

The Egyptian cobra is a large species of snake from the Elapidae family. Endemic to the Northern and Western regions of Africa (along the Sahara), the Egyptian cobra is considered one of Africa’s deadliest snake species with the ability to inflict serious harm (including death) on its victims. As with most cobras, the snake can be easily identified by its flattened head, large hood, and coloration. Generally speaking, most Egyptian cobras are solid black, and possess creamy white (occasionally grey or yellow) underbellies. Other distinguishing marks include “tear drop” markings below the eyes.

Within Northern and Western Africa, the Egyptian cobra tends to prefer dry climates such as savannas, semi-desert regions, or steppes. However, they can also be found in areas connected to freshwater sources, or that possess a great deal of vegetation (such as agricultural fields). These areas provide the snake with numerous prey options, including small rodents, lizards, eggs, toads, and the occasional snake when opportunities arise.

Did You Know?

The Ancient Egyptians often added symbols of the Egyptian cobra to crowns of their pharaohs. Within their culture, cobras were a symbol of strength and sovereignty.

Egyptian Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Egyptian cobra is an incredibly dangerous snake with a venom that is comprised of both neurotoxins and cytotoxins. A single bite yields (on average) 175 to 300 milligrams of venom, leading to severe envenomation in nearly all snakebite cases. Following a bite, symptoms of envenomation usually begin rapidly as the venom directly attacks the central nervous system of their victims. Initial symptoms include dizziness, severe swelling, necrosis of the wound site, as well as intense pain. More general symptoms of an Egyptian cobra bite include diarrhea, severe abdominal pain, nausea, as well as migraine headaches. Once the venom progresses deeper into the bloodstream, convulsions and complete paralysis of the respiratory system are common, leading to suffocation and death.

Bites from an Egyptian cobra are considered life-threatening emergencies, and should be evaluated by medical personnel quickly to prevent death. Unfortunately, this is not always possible for victims due to the remote habitat of the snake. This, in turn, often results in death. In cases involving rapid care, however, treatment for Egyptian cobra bites generally includes a round of antivenom, along with palliative care which aims to make the patient as comfortable as possible.

The monocled cobra.
The monocled cobra. | Source

8. Monocled Cobra (Naja kaouthia)

  • Average Size: 1.35 to 1.5 meters (4.4 to 4.9 feet)
  • Geographical Range: Southeast Asia (including India, China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Malay Peninsula)
  • Conservation Status: “Least Concern” (Population Stable)

The monocled cobra is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Not to be confused with the “spectacled cobra” of similar coloration and stature, the monocled cobra is a species endemic to Southeast Asia, with a wide distribution across India, China, and the Malay Peninsula. Similar to the Philippine cobra, this species is renowned for its potent venom and ability to “spit.” They can be easily identified by their “O-shaped” hood, along with their unique coloration that ranges from yellow, brown, or grey.

Within Southeast Asia, the monocled cobra can be found in a variety of habitats. Generally speaking, however, their preferred habitat involves areas with substantial amounts of water. This includes marshes, mangroves, swamps, and paddy fields. Prey within these areas is both abundant and plentiful, with frogs, rodents, and fish being the monocled cobra’s primary source of food. In rare cases, the cobra may even feed on other snakes.

Did You Know?

The monocled cobra is currently considered the most venomous snake in Thailand.

Monocled Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The monocled cobra possesses a powerful venom comprised of postsynaptic neurotoxins known to block nerve transmission. Average venom yield is approximately 263 milligrams, resulting in serious envenomation for the majority of bites. Following envenomation, symptoms usually begin within 1 to 4 hours, and include: drowsiness, hypotension, flushing of the face, dizziness, as well as severe pain and muscle weakness. As the venom progresses throughout the victim’s bloodstream, the powerful neurotoxins then begin a systematic attack on the respiratory system, resulting in paralysis and death. Fatalities are common for the majority of untreated bites, with death occurring as early as 60 minutes (in cases of severe envenomation).

Due to their potent venom, bites from a monocled cobra are considered life-threatening emergencies that should be treated as quickly as possible. As with most snake bites, standard treatment involves the administering of cobra-specific antivenom, along with bedrest, palliative care, and intravenous fluids.

The Chinese cobra.
The Chinese cobra. | Source

7. Chinese Cobra (Naja atra)

  • Average Size: 3.9 to 4.9 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Southeastern China
  • Conservation Status: “Vulnerable” (Population Threatened)

The Chinese cobra (also known as the “Taiwan cobra”) is a species of highly-venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Found throughout much of Southeastern China, the Chinese cobra is considered one of the most dangerous species of snake in the country and is responsible for numerous snakebite incidents each year. As with most cobra species, they can be easily identified by their large hood, rounded snout, and iridescent black coloration that contrasts sharply with a pearl-like underbelly.

Within Southeastern China, the Chinese cobra can be found within a variety of habitats. This includes woodlands, mangroves, grasslands, and shrublands with access to freshwater. From these areas, the snake is offered a wide array of prey, including small rodents, lizards, birds, eggs, and frogs. In times of hunger, the Chinese cobra has also been known to eat other snakes.

Did You Know?

The Chinese cobra is often confused with the monocled cobra due to their strong similarities in regard to coloration and skin patterns. However, they can be easily distinguished from this species following a close examination of their scalation.

Chinese Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Chinese cobra possesses an extremely powerful venom that is comprised of postsynaptic neurotoxins and cardiotoxins. Combined, these two toxins unleash a devastating attack against their victim’s heart, lungs, and central nervous system. Following envenomation, symptoms of a Chinese cobra bite begin rapidly and include darkening of the wound site, localized pain and swelling, blistering, as well as necrosis of the skin. Chest discomfort and an inability to speak have also been reported among victims, along with dizziness, chest discomfort, fever, and difficulty breathing. As the venom progresses throughout the body, these symptoms tend to grow in severity, before finally culminating in cardiac arrest or respiratory paralysis (leading to suffocation).

Bites from a Chinese cobra are life-threatening emergencies that require immediate medical attention. In fact, mortality rates from bites range from 15 to 20-percent. Standard treatment involves several rounds of “Purified Naja naja Antivenom” or “Bivalent Antivenom” that is specific for Elapid-based snakes (toxinology.com). This is followed by a systematic cleansing of the wound site, along with palliative care, and pain mitigation therapy. In severe cases, intubation and ventilation may also be required for individuals suffering from respiratory paralysis. Fortunately, fatality rates have dropped significantly in recent years due to the prevalence of antivenoms. However, long-term complications are extremely common for Chinese cobra victims, with some symptoms (such as necrosis of the skin) persisting for several years.

The deadly king cobra.
The deadly king cobra. | Source

6. King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah)

  • Average Size: 10.4 to 13.1 feet (3.1 to 4 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Southeast Asia
  • Conservation Status: “Vulnerable” (Population Threatened)

The king cobra is a deadly species from the Elapidae family of snakes. Found predominantly in the forests and woodlands of India and Southeast Asia, the king cobra is widely regarded as the world’s longest venomous snake, reaching an impressive length of approximately 13.1 feet. Although usually considered a timid animal that avoids human contact (when possible), the king cobra can also be extremely aggressive when harassed and will actively attack aggressors. Apart from their tremendous size, the animal can be easily identified by their large hood, olive-green coloration, as well as their alternating pattern of black and white crossbands (owlcation.com).

Within its natural habitat, the king cobra can often be found in regions approaching 6,600 feet above sea level. In these areas, the snake primarily feeds on other snakes and lizards, including the deadly Indian cobra and banded krait. When these resources are unavailable, the snake turns to small mammals, such as mice, birds, and various rodents.

Did You Know?

The king cobra is one of the few species of snake known to actively construct a nest for their young. It remains unclear why this trait is specific to the king cobra and not other species, in general.

King Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The king cobra’s venom is comprised of deadly cytotoxins and neurotoxins that actively attack an individual’s central nervous system, lungs, and heart. Following a bite, symptoms typically begin within minutes and include extreme vertigo (dizziness), blurred vision, lethargy, slurred speech, as well as paralysis of the legs and arms. Upon reaching the heart and lungs, the king cobra’s venom begins to systematically shut down these vital organs, leading to cardiac arrest or respiratory collapse.

Bites from the king cobra are considered life-threatening emergencies with an overall fatality rate of approximately 28-percent (for treated cases), and a nearly 60-percent fatality rate for untreated bites. This is due, in part, to the snake’s high venom yield which is estimated to be nearly 420 milligrams per bite. Fatalities would be far higher, however, if not for the fact that many king cobra bites are “dry,” thus, resulting in no envenomation.

Standard treatment for a king cobra bite includes several rounds of Polyvalent Antivenom which is sometimes combined with king cobra-specific antivenom (in severe cases). In cases involving breathing difficulties, intubation and ventilation are sometimes used, followed by intravenous fluids to maintain electrolyte balance within the victim’s body. Individuals usually remain hospitalized for approximately 2 weeks to monitor their vital signs. Following discharge, however, long-term complications are common from king cobra bites and include severe muscle pain or weakness, as well as heart and lung issues.

The cape cobra.
The cape cobra. | Source

5. Cape Cobra (Naja nivea)

  • Average Size: 3.9 to 4.6 feet (1.2 to 1.4 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Southern Africa
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (Insufficient Data)

The cape cobra (also known as the “geelslang” or “bruinkapel”) is a species of deadly snake from the Elapidae family. Found predominantly in Southern Africa, the snake is considered one of the most dangerous species on the continent due to its aggressiveness and potent venom. Apart from their relatively large size (reaching upwards of 4.6 feet), the cape cobra can be easily identified by its slim hood, and copper-like coloration that varies between yellow, golden brown, or dark brown.

The cape cobra is considered a diurnal species that is most active during the daylight hours. Within Southern Africa, the snake prefers several habitats that include the Kalahari Desert, scrublands, and arid savannas. From here, the cape cobra feeds primarily on other snakes, rodents, birds, and reptiles (such as lizards). They are also known to display cannibalistic tendencies when food resources are scarce.

Did You Know?

The cape cobra is considered one of Africa's most venomous snakes. Its venom is almost as powerful as the deadly black mamba.

Cape Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The cape cobra possesses an extremely toxic venom that is comprised of both postsynaptic neurotoxins and cardiotoxins. Combined, these two toxins attack both the respiratory and central nervous systems of their victims, along with the heart. Following envenomation, symptoms usually begin within minutes and include pain and swelling, necrosis of the wound site, migraine headaches, as well as nausea and vomiting. Dizziness, diarrhea, and convulsions are also common, along with paralysis of the extremities. As the venom progresses, symptoms tend to grow in severity before culminating in cardiac arrest, coma, or respiratory failure.

Bites from a cape cobra are considered medical emergencies that require immediate treatment to avoid death. And while fatality rates remain unknown for this particular species, they are estimated to be extremely high for both untreated and treated cases (toxinology.com). Standard treatment involves hospital admittance, cleaning of the wound site, along with intubation and ventilation. This is generally followed by several rounds of SAIMR Polyvalent Antivenom or “Walterinnesia Snake Antivenom,” along with intravenous fluids to maintain hydration.

The Indian cobra.
The Indian cobra. | Source

4. Indian Cobra (Naja naja)

  • Average Size: 3.3 to 4.9 feet (1 to 1.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (Insufficient Data)

The Indian cobra (sometimes referred to as the “Asian cobra,” “binocellate cobra,” or “spectacled cobra”) is a species of highly-venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Considered a member of the “Big Four,” the Indian cobra is widely regarded as one of the most dangerous snakes on the Indian Subcontinent due to its powerful venom, aggression, and number of bites it inflicts annually (owlcation.com). Apart from its medium-sized length, the cobra can be easily identified by its stout body, hood, rounded snout, and greyish-yellow (tan) coloration.

Found predominantly on the Indian Subcontinent, which includes India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal, the Indian cobra is known to inhabit various forests and woodlands, plains, wetlands, as well as agricultural fields. This often places the snake in direct contact with humans, as many of these areas are near both villages and cities. Within these areas, the snake feeds on a variety of reptiles and mammals, including other snakes, lizards, birds, and various rodents.

Did You Know?

One of the most unique traits of the Indian cobra is its set of "false eyes" that adorn the back of its hood. These markings tend to resemble "glasses" due to their circular shape and darker appearance.

Indian Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Indian cobra possesses a highly-toxic venom made up of postsynaptic neurotoxins and cardiotoxins. When combined, these two toxins launch a coordinated attack on an individual’s heart, lungs, nervous system, and muscular-skeletal system (owlcation.com). This is aided by an enzyme in the venom known as hyaluronidase, which increases the overall speed (and spread) of the venom into the victim’s bloodstream. Following envenomation, symptoms tend to begin within 15-minutes, and include abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. As the venom takes hold of the central nervous system through the aid of hyaluronidase, dizziness, convulsions, hallucinations, and complete paralysis are common, with cardiac arrest and respiratory collapse following soon after (resulting in death).

Untreated bites from the Indian cobra carry a fatality rate of approximately 30-percent, while treated cases are substantially lower at 9-percent (owlcation.com). Standard treatment for Indian cobra bites include multiple rounds of Polyvalent Antivenom. This is generally followed by intubation and ventilation (to aid with breathing), along with pain mitigation therapy, palliative care, and intravenous fluids (for hydration purposes). Most individuals that receive treatment make full recoveries, with some survivor’s experiencing long-term complications involving the muscles and internal organ damage. Due to the remote nature of the snake’s habitat, however, many individuals are unable to receive prompt treatment. As a result, the snake is often considered one of the deadliest cobra species on the Indian Subcontinent, as many individuals die before they can be started on appropriate antivenom therapy.

The deadly forest cobra.
The deadly forest cobra. | Source

3. Forest Cobra (Naja melanoleuca)

  • Average Size: 4.2 to 7.2 feet (1.4 to 2.2 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Central and Western Africa
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (Insufficient Data)

The forest cobra (sometimes referred to as the “black and white-lipped cobra” or “black cobra”) is a species of venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Considered one of the longest cobra species on the planet (reaching upwards of 10-feet in some cases), the forest cobra is also one of the most dangerous snakes in Africa. This is due to the snake’s natural aggressiveness and powerful venom (owlcation.com). Onlookers can easily identify the forest cobra by its large hood, stout body, and distinct coloration that is glossy-black with a white, brown, and yellow underbelly.

The forest cobra is found predominantly in Central and Western Africa in Kenya, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Senegal (to name only a few countries). Within these regions, the snake tends to favor forested areas (hence its name), but can also be found in grasslands, savannas, and rocky outcroppings. From here, the snake feeds primarily on frogs, lizards, small fish, birds (and their eggs), as well as small rodents.

Did You Know?

The forest cobra is capable of delivering one of the highest venom yields of all snake species. One bite can deliver a staggering 1,101 milligrams of venom, resulting in serious envenomation.

Forest Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The forest cobra’s venom is made up of powerful postsynaptic neurotoxins that attack both the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of their victims. Average venom yields are also extremely high for this species (571 to 1,102 milligrams), resulting in serious envenomation in nearly 100-percent of all bites (toxinology.com). Symptoms of a forest cobra bite usually begin within 30 minutes, and include lethargy, hearing loss, inability to speak, as well as hypotension, and shock. As the venom spreads, dizziness, abdominal cramps, fever, and pallor (general whitening of the skin and face) also occur, and are followed by complete respiratory failure or cardiac arrest.

Bites from a forest cobra are medical emergencies that require immediate treatment. Due to its remote nature, bites are relatively rare for this particular species. Nevertheless, fatality rates for those suffering envenomation are believed to be extremely high (in both untreated and treated cases). Standard treatment involves multiple rounds of SAIMR Polyvalent Antivenom, followed by intubation and ventilation. Intravenous fluids and pain mitigation therapy are also implemented in the majority of snakebite cases to prevent dehydration and excessive stress to the victim’s body. And while treatment is usually effective for many individuals, it is crucial to note that long-term complications are common for forest cobra victims, with internal organ damage being a major issue for many.

A deadly Caspian cobra in a defensive position.
A deadly Caspian cobra in a defensive position. | Source

2. Caspian Cobra (Naja oxiana)

  • Average Size: 3.3 to 4.9 feet (1 to 1.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Transcaspian Region (including Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, and India)
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (Insufficient Data)

The Caspian cobra (sometimes referred to as the “Central Asian cobra,” “ladle cobra,” “oxus cobra,” or “Russian cobra”) is a species of deadly snake from the Elapidae family. Found throughout Central Asia, the Caspian cobra is a medium-sized species reaching upwards of 4.9 feet at maturity. They are an incredibly dangerous snake, and are widely considered by experts to be one of the deadliest animals on the planet. They can be easily identified by their slimmer hood, rounded snout, large nostrils, and chocolate brown (occasionally yellow) coloration.

Throughout the Transcaspian region, the Caspian cobra is found predominantly in Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, as well as the Fergana Valley. Within this region, the snake tends to prefer arid and semiarid climates, along with rocky or shrub-covered foothills. As with many snakes, the Caspian cobra’s diet consists primarily of small rodents, birds, lizards, and the occasional snake.

Did You Know?

Venom from the Caspian cobra is currently being evaluated by the scientific community as a possible treatment for cancer patients. In controlled (and highly-targeted) doses, the venom has been shown to be effective against a variety of cancer cells.

Caspian Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Caspian cobra possesses an extremely potent venom that is comprised of neurotoxins, cytotoxins, and nucleases. Combined, these three compounds unleash a devastating attack on an individual’s heart, lungs, and skin tissue. Average venom yield is approximately 75 to 125 milligrams, resulting in serious envenomation in nearly all bites. Following envenomation, symptoms usually begin rapidly, and include hypotension, lethargy, muscle weakness, and complete paralysis of the throat and extremities. As the venom progresses throughout the bloodstream, severe neurotoxicity is common, leading to convulsions, hallucinations, and migraine headaches. In its final stages, slurred speech and respiratory failure are common, leading to death by suffocation.

Bites from a Caspian cobra are extremely dangerous situations, with fatality rates of approximately 75-percent for individuals unable to receive prompt medical treatment (less than 45 minutes after the bite occurred). Standard treatment involves the use of Polyvalent Snake Antivenom. However, due to the potency of the Caspian cobra’s venom, massive amounts of antivenom are usually required as the serum is often ineffective in normal doses. This is generally followed by intubation, ventilation, and the administration of intravenous fluids to ease the patient’s breathing and hydration, respectively.

While treatment is usually effective for Caspian cobra bites, long-term complications are extremely common for survivors and include internal organ damage, muscle weakness, and nerve pain that can last months or years.

The Philippine cobra (world's deadliest species of cobra).
The Philippine cobra (world's deadliest species of cobra). | Source

1. Philippine Cobra (Naja philippinensis)

  • Average Size: 3.3 to 5.2 feet (1 to 1.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Northern Philippines
  • Conservation Status: “Threatened” (Population in Decline)

The Philippine cobra (sometimes referred to as the “Northern Philippine cobra”) is a species of deadly cobra from the Elapidae family. Endemic to the northern sectors of the Philippines, the Philippine cobra is regularly classified by the scholarly community as the deadliest cobra species on the planet. Reaching upwards of 5.2 feet at maturity, this species is extremely dangerous to humans and animals alike, and should be avoided whenever possible. They are also one of the few cobra species capable of “spitting” their venom at onlookers, which can lead to permanent blindness if the toxin comes into contact with the eyes. The Philippine cobra can be easily identified by its large hood, stocky body, as well as brownish-tan coloration.

Within the northern regions of the Philippines, the Philippine cobra tends to inhabit the area’s low-lying plains, forested areas, and environments connected with freshwater sources (owlcation.com). These areas provide the cobra with a wide array of prey, including small rodents, frogs, lizards, birds, and eggs. In times of starvation, the Philippine Cobra is also known to feed on smaller snakes.

Did You Know?

The Philippine cobra is considered a nocturnal species, and is rarely seen during the daylight hours. For these reasons, bites from the snake are not extremely common.

Philippine Cobra Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Philippine cobra’s venom is comprised of deadly postsynaptic neurotoxins that actively attack their victim’s heart, lungs, and neuromuscular system. In the event of a bite, symptoms usually begin rapidly (within 30-minutes) and involve nausea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, and headaches. This is followed by extreme diarrhea, dizziness, an inability to speak, as well as breathing difficulties and convulsions. In its final stages, the venom suppresses the heart and lungs resulting in respiratory collapse or cardiac arrest.

Without treatment, bites from a Philippine cobra are considered 100-percent fatal due to the snake’s high-venom yield (Brown, 184). As a result, bites are life-threatening emergencies that require immediate hospitalization. Standard treatment involves high-doses of cobra-specific antivenom. This is generally followed by intubation and ventilation, as the Philippine cobra’s venom tends to have a devastating effect on the lungs of their victims. Intravenous fluids are also provided to individuals in order to maintain proper hydration and electrolyte balance during the course of their treatment.

Despite advances in treatment options, deaths are extremely common for Philippine cobra bites due to the remote nature of their habitat. As a result, few individuals are capable of receiving life-saving treatment in a prompt manner, as local hospitals are often several hours away. For these reasons, the Philippine cobra is easily the deadliest and most dangerous cobra species in the world.

Works Cited

Articles/Books:

Images/Photographs:

Wikimedia Commons

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Larry Slawson

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    • Larry Slawson profile imageAUTHOR

      Larry Slawson 

      7 days ago from North Carolina

      Thank you, Pamela! I'm so glad you enjoyed. I agree. The King Cobra sounded horrifying haha.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      8 days ago from Sunny Florida

      I certainly cannot imagine getting anywhere near any cobra but the King Cobra that is 13+ feet long sounds horrible. Any one of these cobras actually sounds horrible.

      This is a very well-orgaized and well-written article, Larry. You always write such excellent articles, and while I do not want to be any where near a cobra I did find this article to be very interesting.

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    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
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    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
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