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The Birds That We Can See in the National Parks of the USA Will Depend on Climate Change

Updated on November 7, 2018
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The symbolic bald eagles, the national birds of the US, could disappear completely from the Grand Canyon National Park during winters due to global warming.

Up to 25% of bird species would be affected by the phenomenon, because they will not be able to adapt to environmental changes because of the speed with which they occur and will need to move to areas where they are now unable to inhabit.

The national parks that provide birds with shelter from many of their threats will not be able to protect them from the effects of the changing climate.

A new study published by the National Audubon Society and the National Park Service of the United States put the magnifying glass exclusively on the consequences of the change in weather conditions on birds in the United States over time.

Its publication explains how, if humans continue to release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, global warming will forever alter the environmental conditions of each protected area, and as a consequence, this will be reflected in a modification of which species are found. in each one of them.

According to the forecast of the study, these changes would be seen clearly in the year 2040.

Thus, species that have historically been found in a park could be locally displaced. These same ones could also begin to frequent other sites, possibly inside another park, where before they were not sighted.

The specialists analyzed 274 different sites with a focus on the 53 best-known parks in the country in which they recorded 513 bird species. As a product of the research, the publication includes a list of each of the species that inhabit each park today and those that are estimated to inhabit there (and those that will have disappeared) by the middle of the century.

They also classified each park into one of three categories of potential for extirpation and colonization by birds. Based on this, they recommend for parks that have a low to medium probability of these modifications, a strategy that focuses on conservation at the habitat level, emphasizing the restoration of the landscape and maintenance of resources, avoiding their modification and reducing pressures .

For parks with high potential for species exchange, they recommend focusing on actions that increase the species' capacity to respond to environmental changes, such as increasing the amount of habitat available for species, and working in cooperation with agencies and landowners to improve the connectivity of these protected habitats. Also a more intensive work in activities directly related to wildlife such as monitoring of nests and their trans-location if necessary.

They hope that this information collected and its analysis serves two purposes: on the one hand highlight the severity of the implications of climate change and on the other, provide useful information for the successful implementation of adaptive strategies for the management of natural resources and protected lands in Advance to the changes that are coming.

In the mid-21st century, the climate of the park is expected to improve for birds that live in dry forests at medium altitude, such as the red-hooded pyranga.
In the mid-21st century, the climate of the park is expected to improve for birds that live in dry forests at medium altitude, such as the red-hooded pyranga.
By 2050, visitors may find a new combination of birds of prey that tower over Grand Canyon National Park, a raptor bird corridor, and a designated area of global importance to birds.
By 2050, visitors may find a new combination of birds of prey that tower over Grand Canyon National Park, a raptor bird corridor, and a designated area of global importance to birds.
However, it is expected that the bald eagles will decrease, and that the latter will possibly become extinct locally. The pine and juniper forests of the park could also be affected by warming and increasingly dry conditions.
However, it is expected that the bald eagles will decrease, and that the latter will possibly become extinct locally. The pine and juniper forests of the park could also be affected by warming and increasingly dry conditions.
The pale tile can be removed from the park. Meanwhile, the species most adapted to the arid Great Plains, such as the Mississippi kite, the Cotuí quail and the pink tiger-eared tyrant, and to the southwest, like the scaly quail.
The pale tile can be removed from the park. Meanwhile, the species most adapted to the arid Great Plains, such as the Mississippi kite, the Cotuí quail and the pink tiger-eared tyrant, and to the southwest, like the scaly quail.
By the year 2050, as the climate warms, many northern songbirds, such as chestnut warblers and orange-throated warblers, can breed in cooler forests north of the park's borders.
By the year 2050, as the climate warms, many northern songbirds, such as chestnut warblers and orange-throated warblers, can breed in cooler forests north of the park's borders.

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