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There’s nothing like wagging tails

Updated on July 5, 2012

There’s nothing like wagging tails

Last Friday I left home to start camp counselor training. I’ve done the training before and so I knew what to expect. But, when I arrived, I was surprised to see that one of the staff brought her dog. I was so excited. The dog, Champ, was very well behaved, but not overly interested in social interaction. He also shared similar characteristics and qualities as Sam and Bosley, so that added to my enjoyment of his presence.


I know the behavior of dogs depends on their owner, but Champ’s choice of independence was interesting to watch. Champ is about 12 or 13 years old and I don’t know how often he visits the camp, but I was quite surprised at how he just walked around camp like he had lived there all his life. I worked with the owner a few years ago and Champ wasn’t there, so that added to my surprise. Unfortunately, now that training is over, he won’t be at camp.


The camp has a lot of acreage, but most of the activities tend to happen in a few general locations. I was surprised how Champ casually walked anywhere, whenever he wanted. Not that it was a bad thing, but I’m so used to having to walk Bosley and now that Sam is older I have to watch her more. When she was younger I trusted her to be free, but she was never in Champ’s position to wonder a camp. I’m sure she would’ve handled the freedom well though.


Just like Sam, Champ has cataract. His eyes weren’t as glossy as Sam’s though. And, just like Sam, he doesn’t bark. One thing he did share with Bosley however, was his appetite for human food. Although people weren’t feeding him any human food, he had no problem waiting and once he took it upon himself to steel some food from a bench when people weren’t paying attention. I can’t say I’d blame him, it was an open opportunity.


I find it fascinating how dogs just know how to swim. Sam and Bosley haven’t had swimming opportunities, and so I don’t know how they’d take to it. Because Sam is about comfort and she tries to maintain her coat, I don’t think she’d like to swim. As for Bosley, he might possibly like it. So back to Champ. His owner is the waterfront director at camp and so he spent a lot of his time there. It was cute; he even had his own doggie life vest. Adorable was the only word to describe him. Watching him rest on the dock was cute too, because it was a classic camp picture. Every camp should have a dog. Unfortunately there are kids who don’t like them and or may be allergic to them. Obviously you can’t help what you’re allergic to, but that’d be absolutely horrible.


When I arrived home yesterday I wasn’t expecting anyone. But, as I approached the door, I heard whimper. To my surprise, Bosley and Sam were inside. I was so excited to see them. Their tails appeared to be swinging a mile-a-minute. I loved it. It really is something, how fast their tails wag. I don’t know what muscle controls their tails, but it must be very strong because of how frequent and fast they wag their tails.


Clearly they were pleased to see me and as the night and today went on, so too, did our routines. Watching TV earlier, Bosley took it upon himself to jump up on the chair and onto my lap. No problem, except, I had my laptop on my lap. He didn’t care. So he could be comfortable I closed it and allowed him to get comfortable. I love it when he knows what he wants and just goes for it. He didn’t stand back and wait to see if I’d move the computer, instead he just climbed up and was ready to push it off my lap if necessary.


I have to go back to camp Sunday night and it’s not a big deal, but it’s just amazing how much I miss them when I’m gone. Fortunately, it’ll only be five days before I’ll see their wagging tails again. They don’t talk, but their actions really do speaker louder than words and that’s so amazing. I love them and their wagging tails.


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    • Woodchuck47 profile image
      Author

      Woodchuck47 5 years ago from Yulan, New York

      Lol, good point!

    • PetMemorialWorld profile image

      PetMemorialWorld 5 years ago from New Zealand

      That is why pet owners live longer :)

    • Woodchuck47 profile image
      Author

      Woodchuck47 5 years ago from Yulan, New York

      Agreed

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 5 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      Apologies - I assumed Sam was male. She still looks distinguished, though that word never seems so complementary when applied to a female.

    • Woodchuck47 profile image
      Author

      Woodchuck47 5 years ago from Yulan, New York

      Thanks. Having Champ at camp was great, I'm really disappointed that he'll be leaving, but I understand why. Having dogs not only at camp, but also in general, provides a different sense of company. They have character traits of people, but not to the same extent and so I really enjoy their company. Sam is my baby. I've lost track of the years, but she's either 13 or so. I've written about her several times, because she'd had such a large impact on my life. Thanks for reading and commenting it’s always great to see what people have to say!

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 5 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      I enjoyed reading about Champ joining his owner at work. My greyhound came to work with me an an agricultural college for 5 years. She was 100% sound with livestock and free range poultry and could wander about where she wanted. Mostly she didn't go far, but occasionally she went over to visit the horse unit and discovered they often had snacks in the staff room - once I caught her coming back with a bag of iced buns in her mouth! I swiped them off her and snuck them back before they noticed.

      Love the picture of Sam - he looks so distinuished.