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Tiny Creatures That You Seldom See

Updated on October 1, 2016

When people think of tiny creatures they immediately think of insects. This is a false assumption because there are many tiny creatures that are not insects. Some people have never heard of some of these tiny creatures.


Bumblebee Bat

Bumblebee Bat By Jyfrey A McNasley
Bumblebee Bat By Jyfrey A McNasley | Source

When people think of tiny creatures they immediately think of insects. This is a false assumption because there are many tiny creatures that are not insects. Some people have never heard of some of these tiny creatures.

The Bumblebee Bat is one of these tiny creatures. They are 1 ½ inches and weigh .07 ounces. They are considered the tiniest mammal in the world.


Kittis Hognose Bat By Momotarou 2012 CC BY-SA 3.0
Kittis Hognose Bat By Momotarou 2012 CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source


They are also called the Kittis Hog-nosed bat. They make their home in Thailand and Myanmar. No one knew they existed until 1972.

Their habitat is being logged off and they are endangered of becoming extinct.


Pygmy Marmoset

Pygmy Marmoset By Tomfredal CC BY-SA 3.0
Pygmy Marmoset By Tomfredal CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source


The Pygmy Marmoset is said to be the smallest primate. They will be 117 to 152 mm and have a tail that is 172 to 229 mm. They will weigh around 100 grams.

The Pygmy Marmoset lives in the rain forests of South America's Amazon basin.


Pygmy Marmoset By Tony Hisgett CC BY-SA 2.0
Pygmy Marmoset By Tony Hisgett CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Pygmy Marmoset is also called the Little Lion, Dwarf Monkey, and Pocket Monkey. They are a new world monkey.


Bee Hummingbird

Bee Hummingbird By Charlesjsharp CC BY-SA 4.0
Bee Hummingbird By Charlesjsharp CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The Bee Hummingbird is the smallest bird found in Cuba and the West Indies. They are 5 to 6 cm and will weigh 1.06 to 2g. The female is slightly larger than the male. They are called Bee Hummingbirds because they are the size of a bumblebee.


Beehummingbird By gailhampshire CC BY-SA 2.0
Beehummingbird By gailhampshire CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

They like to eat nectar, and insects. They are endangered at this time.

Many people mistake the Bee Hummingbird for the Hummingbird Moth.


Madame Bertha's Mouse Lemure

Madame Bertha's Mouse Lemure By EC Casuauo GNU 1.2
Madame Bertha's Mouse Lemure By EC Casuauo GNU 1.2 | Source

Madame Bertha's Mouse Lemure is a small primate and the smallest lemur. They are 2 inches and weigh 2 ounces. Their tail is about 4 inches long.

They like to move around at night. They make their home in forests in groups that are dominated by a female. They live in the Kininby forest of Madagascar.

They are endangered because they are losing their habitat. They are also hunted for the pet trade.



Paedoeypres

Paedoeypres fish Courtesy of news.softpedia.com
Paedoeypres fish Courtesy of news.softpedia.com | Source

The Paedocypres is a tiny fish. They are considered the smallest fish in the world. They make their home in Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

The female is 2.9 to 10.3mm long. They are translucent. They live in swamps and like water with a high acidity. They are engendered because they are losing their habitat.



Pygmy Rabbit

Pygmy Rabbit By USFWS CC BY-SA 2.0
Pygmy Rabbit By USFWS CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

Rabbits are so cute. Tiny rabbits are so cuddly and cute also. You will find the Pygmy Rabbit living in North America. An Adult pygmy rabbit is 23.5 to 29.5cm and weighs 375 to 500g.

The Pygmy Rabbit will dig its own burrows which is unusual. When they live in Nevada they will be found at 1370 to 2135 meters. When they live in California they are found living at 1520 to 1615 meters. They are preyed on by coyotes, weasels, bobcats, owls, badgers and foxes. Humans also prey on Pygmy Rabbits. They are threatened at this time.


Brookesia micra chameleon on a match head

Brookesia micra chameleon on a match head By Unknown
Brookesia micra chameleon on a match head By Unknown | Source

The Brookesia Micra Chameleon is considered the smallest chameleon. An adult male of the B. Micra species has a one-half inch long body and their tail is one inch long.


Royal Antelope

Royal Antelope By Mike Raner CC BY-SA 3.0
Royal Antelope By Mike Raner CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Royal Antelope is very tiny. They make the forests of Western Africa their home. They will eat leaves and fruit that is not ripe. They are 25 to 30cm and will weigh 3.2 to 3.6kg.

The Royal Antelope likes to move around at night.

They have very long slender legs. Their front legs are a lot shorter than their back legs. They have a reddish-brown coat. They have a white underside. The male will have very small horns that are black. Their horns will be around 3.5cm long.



Thread Snake

Courtesy of wikipedia.org
Courtesy of wikipedia.org | Source

The tiny Thread Snake lives in South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. They are a burrowing snake that eats ants and termites. They are usually less than 30cm long.


Virgin Dwarf Gecko

Virgin Dwarf Gecko Courtesy of wildfacts.com
Virgin Dwarf Gecko Courtesy of wildfacts.com | Source

The Virgin Dwarf Gecko is found in the British Virgin Islands. They like to make their home in dry hillsides under rocks.

They are very small being 18cm long and weighing 0.15g. There are different species of dwarf geckos.





Etruscan Pygmy Shrew

Etruscan Pygmy Shrew By Stella Putella GNU 1.2
Etruscan Pygmy Shrew By Stella Putella GNU 1.2 | Source

The Etruscan Pygmy Shrew is very small being 4cm and this does not include their tail. They will weigh around 2 grams. Their metabolism is very high and it is said they will eat twice their body weight every day.

They like to make their home in moist and warm areas. They will be found in North Africa up to Malaysia and in Europe.







Comments

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    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      Thanks for liking it. There are a lot more tiny creatures. Many of them I never heard of.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 

      2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      These are all so fascinating. Thanks for the introduction to macro life.

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      Thank you so very much for reading and commenting on my article. Thanks also for sharing it.

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 

      2 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      What a delightful hub! I really enjoyed reading about these tiny creatures and must share it with one of my granddaughters, she'll love it, too.

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      Glad you liked it. Appreciate you comment and reading the article. I get very few views so all are greatly appreciated. I have been doing this for 3 1/2 months and do not have 1500 yet. Pretty bad. Makes me want to give up. I have always done well at submitting articles but not with Hub Pages. I also write for Textbroker and do well there. I stay here because I the like the other articles and the few comments I do get. Thanks.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very cool animals! There were a few here I have never heard of. Loved it!

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      We do have a lot of creatures no one has heard about. Thanks for comment.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Our world is filled with so many interesting and unique creatures...thank you for sharing these with us.

      Angels are on the way to you this afternoon. pinned and shared ps

    • norlawrence profile imageAUTHOR

      Norma Lawrence 

      2 years ago from California

      I agree with your thought on the snake. I do not care how small it is. Thanks for comment.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      2 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Beautiful examples! I have met some of them in person. Would love to see them all...well not the snake, but all the rest.

      Shared.

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