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Top 10 Giant Insects From Around the World

Updated on September 21, 2019
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Ricky Rodson is an experienced cryptozoologist with several published books on the subjects of zoology, cryptozoology, and mythical beasts.

What Are Giant Insects?

Insects are a touchy subject around the world; some people love them, most people hate them. But the one thing everyone can agree on is that the larger they are the more monstrous they feel. Large insects feel like something from a prehistoric time and leave most people feeling both fear and awe at the same time. This list is meant to compile some of the world's largest and most monstrous insects for you to know what type of creatures are lurking in the shadows around the world. Be careful thou, after viewing this post you might decide to never travel again on account of the giant insects found around the planet.

The upper-side of the Atlas Moth's wings are covered in a pattern of white, black, pink, and purple triangular shapes.
The upper-side of the Atlas Moth's wings are covered in a pattern of white, black, pink, and purple triangular shapes.

Atlas Moth

The Atlas Moth is a monstrous inspect that comes from Southeast Asia. This flying beast has a wingspan of over 10 inches and is considered to be one of the strangest inspects on the planet. This moth is born without a fully formed mouth, this means that that despite it's large size this moth is unable to feed and begins to slowly die of starvation from the day it hatches. Because of this bizarre evolutionary trait, most of these most only have a live span of 2 - 3 weeks. Because of it's size, It's doubtful that bug spray would take down something like this; your better off throwing the can at it and hoping for the best.

The Amazonian Giant Centipede can be found in both tropical or sub-tropical rainforest.
The Amazonian Giant Centipede can be found in both tropical or sub-tropical rainforest.

Amazonian Giant Centipede

The Amazonian Giant Centipede is one of the largest, and most disgusting, species of centipedes on the planet. This enormous tentacle looking bug can grow to be nearly 15 inches in length and is known to be extremely aggressive. Unlike most of the other insects of this list of the largest inspects, this monster is actually carnivorous, and has been know to feed on small lizards, frogs, snakes, mice and even birds. Their toxic venom is so strong is also can cause severe pain, swelling, and fever in humans.

In Japanese mountain villages, the Japanese Giant Hornet is considered a rare delicacy.
In Japanese mountain villages, the Japanese Giant Hornet is considered a rare delicacy.

Japanese Hornets

The Japanese Giant Hornet is an ridiculously large species of hornet that is 5 times the size of the normal honeybee. Like most bees, the Japanese Giant Hornet is extremely aggressive when provoked. But unlike most bees, their venom is very dangerous and attacks the nervous system and damages the tissue of its victims. These monsters are known for killing as many 70 people per year. As seen in the video below, these vicious flying bugs are capable of killing thousands of their smaller counterparts in a matter of hours.

Japanese Hornets Kill 30,000 Bees

Camel Spiders have an estimated top speed of 10 mph.
Camel Spiders have an estimated top speed of 10 mph.

Giant Camel Spider

The Giant Camel Spider is the insect that inspired our list of "Top 10 Giant Insects from around the World". This carnivorous spider has quite the devilish reputation. Despite the pictures that have been circulating the Internet over 10 years, the Giant Camel Spider can only grow to about 6 inches in the length and weight almost 2 ounces. The Camel Spider's bite may not be fatal to humans but is capable of taking down other insects, rodents, lizards, and even small birds. Their large and powerful jaws use a chopping and sawing motion to crush and devour their prey.

The Goliath Spider is the largest spider in the world according to mass and size.
The Goliath Spider is the largest spider in the world according to mass and size.

Goliath Spider

The Goliath Spider, also known as the Goliath Birdeater, is a terrifyingly large spider that belongs to the tarantula family. While the spiders are only found in the rainforests of South America, they have been known and feared around the world. Females of the species of spider can live upwards to 25 years, while males on the other hand usually die in less than 10. The Goliath Birdeater can grow upwards to 12 inches in length and can weigh almost 6 ounces but despite this enormous size and its terrifying name the spider hardly ever preys on birds.

A female Stick-Bug can lay anywhere from 100 to 1,200 eggs each after mating.
A female Stick-Bug can lay anywhere from 100 to 1,200 eggs each after mating.

Stick-Bug

The Phasmatodea, or more commonly known as the stick bug, is a very large insect that looks like a living stick. These elongated creatures can grow upwards to 22 inches long but despite this long size they still only weight less than 3 ounces. These freaky bugs can be found all over the world but are more diversely located in the tropics and subtropics. The island of Borneo has over 300 different species of stick-bug alone. This insect's strange appearance is thought to be an anti-predator defense mechanism and is used to help it blend in with nature.

Video of a Stick-Bug In Action

Goliath Beetles can be found throughout many of Africa's tropical forest.
Goliath Beetles can be found throughout many of Africa's tropical forest.

Goliath Beetle

Goliath Beatles is the name of five species of gigantic beetles that are among the world's largest insects. These bugs can grow to be almost 4 1/2 inches long and weigh almost 2 ounces. Like most beetles, these bugs possess a pair of extra hard wings for protection and a second pair for flying. The males of this species have a Y-shaped torn on the top of the head that they use to do battle with other Beatles overfeeding sites and women. Unlike many of the other insects on this list, the Goliath beetle is not usually feared.

Queen Alexandra's Birdwing is a species of endangered butterfly that is illegal to international trade.
Queen Alexandra's Birdwing is a species of endangered butterfly that is illegal to international trade.

Queen Alexandra's Birdwing

The Queen Alexandra's Birdwing is the world's largest butterfly. These beautiful flying insects wingspan can grow to nearly 10 inches in length and were originally discovered in 1906 by Albert Meek. The bird wing is sadly restricted to the forests of Oro province, Papua New Guinea. As with most species of bugs, the female is distinctly larger than the male but they can also be identified by their rounder and broader wings. Unlike their female counterparts, the male's wings are long and angular with a bluish-green hue. due to their delicate nature and endangered status the Queen Alexandria's birdwing one of the world's only insects to make Appendix 1 of CITES.

Giant Wētā are indigenous to New Zealand.
Giant Wētā are indigenous to New Zealand.

Giant Weta

The Giant Weta is a extremely large type for grasshopper known to inhabit New Zealand. This size is believed to be an direct examples of island gigantism. One female Weta was documented to have grown to weight 2.5 oz, making it one of the heaviest insects. Their genus name, Deinacrida, means "terrible grasshopper" because of their fearful appearance. Due to the introduction of mammalian pests these passive giants have been almost exterminated from the mainland and are primarily located on offshore islands.

The Giant African Land Snail is native to East Africa but has migrated to various parts of the world through various means.
The Giant African Land Snail is native to East Africa but has migrated to various parts of the world through various means.

Giant African Land Snail

The is a ugly creature that has landed itself on the list of the top 100 invasive species in the world due to its habit of causing severe damage to the local agricultural crops and plant-life. Aside from their invasive habits this enormous snail is harmless to those around it. Parts of the world even allow for this beast to be kept as a pet, even thou we couldn't think of a reason anyone would want to do so.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Ricky Rodson

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