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Top 7 Dog Breeds for the UK Household

Updated on February 20, 2018
Craig Easom profile image

Craig has been a writer on HubPages since 2013. He is currently studying for Marketing at Nottingham Trent University—in the land of Robin.

(cc image, Wikimedia Commons) A Fully-Grown Samoyed - THE VERY BEST DOGS LIST
(cc image, Wikimedia Commons) A Fully-Grown Samoyed - THE VERY BEST DOGS LIST

Top 7 Dog Breeds - We Love Them!

Top 7 Dog Breeds
Size
Characteristics
No.1 - Samoyed
Big
Sociable, Happiest in Pairs
No.2 - Westiepoo (Mixed Breed: West Highland Terrier and Miniature Poodle)
Very Small
Terrier ‘Rambunctious’ Personality, with the Happy Medium Temperment of the Miniature Poodle
No.3 - Colliedoodle (“Rare”, Mixed Breed: Border Collie and Miniature Poodle)
Big
Remains the Size and Stature of the Collie, whilst coupled with the Happy Miniature Poodle Temperment, Most Likely Having the Curled Fur and Face Also
No.4 - Labradoodle (Mixed Breed: Labrador Retriever and Miniature Poodle)
Big
Similar to the Colliedoodle, the Labradoodle Retains the Build and Stature of the Labrador Retriever, Whilst Also Inheriting the Mad Curls in Coating from the Miniature Poodle, as Well as Facial Similarities
No.5 - Shetland “Sheltie” Sheepdog
Small
Imagine the Border Collie, Only the Sheltie is Half the Size, Originally Bred in Scotland for Containing Flocks of Sheep
No.6 - Maltipoo (Mixed Breed: Maltese and Miniature Poodle)
Very Small
The Maltese Can Be a Nasty Piece of Work, But Coupled with the Calming Nature of the Miniature Poodle The Maltipoo Can Be One of the Most Patient and Friendly Dog Breeds Available on the Market
No.7 - Maremma Sheepdog
Big
Originally Bred in Italy, the Maremma Sheepdog is Not the Most Common and Saughtafter Dog Breeds in the UK, But They Are Super-Friendly, Easy to Train, And Perfect For Rallying Flocks of Sheep
Difficult to choose the best of the best when it comes down to dog breeds, but mix and match on occasion and these are the best in our minds (family friendly, baby friendly, dog friendly, cat friendly, and filled with life)
(cc image, WhiteMagicSamoyeds) - A Puppy Samoyed
(cc image, WhiteMagicSamoyeds) - A Puppy Samoyed

No.1 - Samoyed

Breed: Pure-Breed: Samoyed

Size: Big (although, perhaps one that is closer to a medium build)

Strengths: Sociable, good with young children, and calm by nature

Weaknesses: Shedding is high, not great for those with dog (typically dog fur) allergies

Big dog lovers melt when we see the Samoyed for the first time, looking almost as though they belong in the arctic. A pure bread fully grown Samoyed is perhaps amongst the smallest of the big dogs, and are often referred to as wolfdogs, but this is more a matter of saying than a fact, as this breed is a whole series of generations apart from the wild wolf as it were.

Super cushy white coat, perhaps the purest and most angel-like of white coats, the Samoyed has a rather unique plush tail that is extremely furry and curls over and around the top of its back.

Clearly the initial regerstering of this breed was done somewhere with a cold climate, as their beautiful husky-like snouts remind us of the arctic fox, but the Great British weather should suit the Samoyed well as the UK climate is cold most of the year around.

The characteristics of the Samoyed is all above board, as the breed is renowned for their intelligence, almost befitting as a snowy guide throughout the mountains, and the Samoyed is very sociable (*intelligence does affect a dogs sociable nature, and the more so intelligent are typically the more so sociable by nature), known for making great companions for other Samoyeds as well as the human family. It is perhaps their pack-like nature that often sees them being reffered to as wolfdogs.

(cc image) Westiepoo Puppies
(cc image) Westiepoo Puppies

No.2 - Westiepoo

Breed: Mixed Breed: West Highland Terrier and Miniature Toy Poodle

Size: Very Small

Strengths: Popular mix breed, great for growing families as the Westiepoo may be a sometimes very small dog but they are always full of life no matter what the age.

Weaknesses: Known to have leg/joint problems in later life.

First-hand experience in owning two as family pets now for over 9 years (the oldest, Ebony), and 6 years (the youngest, Angel), have proven themselves to be overly kind, as it seems the docile, calm temperament of the Miniature Poodle has leaked over into the mixed breeds (half Miniature Poodle, half West Highland Terrier) overall personality, making them extremely intelligent, calm, patient, and overly-friendly with everyone and anyone that they get to know for more than 5 minutes.

Perhaps one of the pounciest dog breeds ever in the history of dog breeds, the youngest is bigger with less agility to jump high, but the oldest of 9 years still jumps all over the place trying to get into mischief. In the daytime, the pouncier one likes to get a chair side view of the slats through the living room blinds, and the other lays below waiting for the other to bark signaling a duo-bark-quartet to commence.

(cc image, Pinterest) A Fully-Grown Colliedoodle
(cc image, Pinterest) A Fully-Grown Colliedoodle

No.3 - Colliedoodle

Breed: Mixed Breed: Border Collie and Miniature “Toy” Poodle

Size: Big (although not technically true, our minds jump straight to the medium size build)

Strengths: Everything we love about the Collie, with all the additional charms of the Miniature Poodle.

Weaknesses: Prone to joint problems, lung complications, and lesser likely health problems in later life.

This is where doing the research on mixed dog breeds really pays off, as this is one of the least recognised by the casual dog lover breeds that a person could ever wish to come by.

Honestly, the Colliedoodle has so much of the Miniature Poodle lavered throughout the look of the mixed variety breed that it is melt-worthy just to think about. A similar build to the Collie (Border Collie), the Colliedoodle is a welcoming adversary to the dog breed variety, and have a super-adorable curled fur coat shine to them that the right family would feel right at home adding as the next addition to the family household.

(cc image, NextDayPets) A Puppy Labradoodle
(cc image, NextDayPets) A Puppy Labradoodle

No.4 - Labradoodle

Breed: Mixed Breed: Labrador Retriever and Miniature ‘Toy’ Poodle

Size: Big (again, not technically true, but the mix results lead us to immediately think medium size build)

Strengths: Family dog blended with another very popular family dog, the result is one of the greatest family dogs to ever exist. Fur grows out quickly, meaning a proper groom is required every couple of months to keep the fur at a maintained level, also keeping the dogs fur from growing over the eyes which can cause the vision to strain.

Weaknesses: Medium shedding, but overall a dog with relatively few health problems (at least, not until later years of life).

The Labradoodle is a very popular signature family dog, having desirable characteristics traits from both the Labrador Retriever and the Miniature “Toy” Poodle, having been widely praised for their patience, acceptance of other family pets (such as other dogs and cats), ability to be left home alone without disturbances, friendly nature, and medium shedding.

What makes the Labradoodle unique is it’s big size and tight fur curls which come from the Miniature Poodle side of the family, and the size of course comes from the Labrador (the other side of the family). Fur colouring is known to be excessive dark brown, and also a much finer lighter brown colour, so it’s even all the way towards the darker colouring or all the way to the opposite side with lighter colouring. The iconic for this particular breed is the dark brown, matched with the tight fur curls. Grooming is a must for the Labradoodle, as the fur can grow out and become rather messy looking, so it is important to have the Labradoodle groomed at least once every 2-3 months.

(cc image, Pinterest) Shetland "Sheltie" Sheepdog Puppies
(cc image, Pinterest) Shetland "Sheltie" Sheepdog Puppies
(cc image, PremierPups) Mini-Sheltie Puppy
(cc image, PremierPups) Mini-Sheltie Puppy

No.5 - Shetland “Sheltie” Sheepdog

Breed: Pure-Breed: Sheltie

Size: Small (technically classed as small, the “Sheltie” feels closer to a medium size build)

Strengths: Has one of the calmest nature’s of all the dog breeds, similar to that of the Labrador, and is very trainable, with its main breeding purpose having been to help round-up sheep in Scotland, as well as also being a well-known show dog at competing in events.

Weaknesses: Weak limbs and lungs which can cause serious issues in later life.

The Collie look is a guarantee when we overlook the Sheltie, originally bred in the Scottish highlands for flocking sheep, and are great for family life, but will require a garden space (not suitable for apartment living) where they can stretch their legs and get plenty of exercise.

Approximately half the size of Lassie (from the popular movie), yet still retaining the same look in its entirety, the Sheltie is a loyal companion to the end, and almost always take well to strangers, and are generally regarded as being one of the safest dog breeds to spend great deals of time around babies and very young children.

The Miniature Lassie has a great deal of fur, requiring a daily brush routine to prevent the fur from getting knotted and tangled, with their one drawback being their weak legs, as getting older means that the Sheltie will be most likely unable to make very big jumps, and for this reason the Sheltie should not be allowed to jump up on any furniture due to it potentially setting off joint issues within their genetically weak legs.

(cc image, NextDayPets) Maltipoo Puppy
(cc image, NextDayPets) Maltipoo Puppy

No.6 - Maltipoo

Breed: Mixed Breed: Maltese and Miniature “Toy” Poodle

Size: Very Small

Strengths: Friendly personality, suitable for a doggy sociable life living with other dogs and/or cats, and like all very small dog breeds, the Maltipoo thrives on lots of love and affection from the human family.

Weaknesses: The Maltipoo is prone to minor health problems down the road, such as progressive retinal atrophy, a degenerative eye disorder that eventually causes blindness; and cardiomyopathy, a not so common condition, but Maltipoo cardiomyopathy is a very complicated health condition.

The Maltipoo is very small and very cute, growing in popularity with its in-fashion look in today’s world, but besides all the doggy dress-up conversations, the Maltipoo is actually a very friendly dog breed, with the half Maltese side being tougher and known for having temper tantrums, and the Miniature Poodle side being calm and serene, the Maltipoo is one of the easiest going very small dog breeds.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
(cc image, DogsBreedSierramichelsslettvet) A Puppy Maremma Sheepdog(cc image, Wikimedia Commons) Maremma Sheepdog Puppy
(cc image, DogsBreedSierramichelsslettvet) A Puppy Maremma Sheepdog
(cc image, DogsBreedSierramichelsslettvet) A Puppy Maremma Sheepdog
(cc image, Wikimedia Commons) Maremma Sheepdog Puppy
(cc image, Wikimedia Commons) Maremma Sheepdog Puppy

No.7 - Maremma Sheepdog

Breed: Pure-Breed: Maremma Sheepdog (also goes by the names; Pastore, Abruzzese, Cane da Pastore, and Italian Sheepdog)

Size: Big

Strengths: Loyal, friendly, easy to train, great for company on long walks/hikes, and highly intelligent. Perfect for life in the countryside, perhaps even close to farms, as the Maremma Sheepdog often enjoy watching flocks of sheep scatter around, as well as their original breeding purpose of actually flocking the sheep if they were living on a farm.

Weaknesses: Require lots of exercise (a long morning or evening walk is a must), high shedding, and are known to bark a lot (*worse when left alone in the house). For the majority, the Maremma is a healthy dog breed, but like all dogs they are prone to certain health problems, however here it is more specific to the larger breeds of dogs. The Maremma is prone to hip dysplasia, as well as other musculoskeletal issues.

To help avoid hip and joint related health issues later in life, it is vital that from a puppy the Maremma Sheepdog receieves a healthy filling of food and exercise to work towards a pro-active lifestyle that favours the dogs long and full lifespan.

The Maremma Sheepdog is a big commitment, as not only do they shed a high volume of fur (meaning an infrequent bath schedule is all but too necessary for this dog breed), but they also require long brisk walks, as a quick circle around the block and back simply isn’t going to cut it with a dog of this size.

Bred for rounding up flocks of sheep, the Maremma Sheepdog is intelligent, requiring lots of exercise and space to run around freely, as this way they should be much more settled within the family home. A gorgeous Italian origin breed, the Maremma has a bear-like face, a thick undercoat, and a beautiful pair of eyes that express love and intelligent doggy thinking.

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