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Top Ten Interesting and Fun Facts About Birds

Updated on June 17, 2017
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Amanda is a retired educator with many years of experience teaching children of all ages and abilities in a wide range of contexts.

Weird Birds - Strange Birds - Wonderful Birds!

Birds are everywhere.

They have adapted to life in the wilderness. They live in forests and jungles. They live in deserts and high mountains. They live in rivers and far out at sea. Some even live in caves and underground burrows. You see them in parks and gardens and nesting on buildings in the heart of the biggest cities.

The only place on Earth that birds haven't managed to colonize is the deepest ocean.

But let's face it - hardly anything has.

Well, apart from some scary, bug-eyed, gloopy things that look more like they've splashed out of the pages of a science fiction comic than anything else!

Bird Exhibition: Exotic Fairground Attractions

A couple of centuries  ago, these African birds were considered so exotic and strange that they were regularly 'exhibited' at travelling fairs, alongside the 'freak' shows' and 'amazing wonders' type of entertainments popular at the time.
A couple of centuries ago, these African birds were considered so exotic and strange that they were regularly 'exhibited' at travelling fairs, alongside the 'freak' shows' and 'amazing wonders' type of entertainments popular at the time. | Source

Fun Facts About Birds

So let's take a light-hearted look at some fascinating and fun facts about birds.

All birds have feathers and wings and a 'bill' or 'beak.' Those are the basic things that define what a bird is.

But the variations on that theme are mind-boggling. Let's take a look at my list of the top ten fun and interesting facts about birds....

1. Roadrunner

The real Roadrunner is a desert bird from southwest America.
The real Roadrunner is a desert bird from southwest America. | Source

Did you know...

  • There are nearly ten thousand different bird species
  • Most scientists now believe that birds evolved from dinosaurs
  • Bird bones are hollow to help them fly

'Beep Beep' It's Roadrunner!

Those of you of a certain age or younger folk who watch the re-runs on a cartoon channel, will know about the classic comedy capers revolving around the efforts of Wile E. Coyote to capture the elusive Roadrunner.

What you may not know, is that the roadrunner is a real bird! But before we look at the astonishing truth about this real life, crazy-bird, let's just take a quick look at the cartoon version.

Here he is in a typical comedy caper...

Roadrunner Cartoon

Did you know...

  • There are more chickens than any other kind of bird in the whole world
  • Birds like weavers and crows are so smart that they can make and use tools
  • Hummingbirds can't just hover - they can fly backwards, too!

Facts About Roadrunners

Roadrunners are real birds that live in the deserts of the American southwest.

Like all birds, they have wings but they very rarely fly. When they do, they are not very good at it!

But... they sure can run.

For a relatively small bird, they can zip along through the desert at a cool 20 miles per hour. That's as fast as any Olympic sprinter.

If you're from the southwest, you might have seen a roadrunner whizzing along the road, although in real life they rarely run in a straight line. But, because they are so quick, they frequently catch rattlesnakes. When they do, they swallow them whole. Yum.

2. Toucan

The toucan is a pretty odd looking bird that comes from the forests of South America.
The toucan is a pretty odd looking bird that comes from the forests of South America. | Source

Did you know...

  • Ostriches are flightless birds but they can run up to sixty miles per hour
  • Many birds fly thousands of miles without stopping when they migrate
  • A swallow spends the first four years of its life in the air after it leaves the nest

Facts about Toucans

Toucans are top heavy!

There is no bird known that has a bigger bill in relation to the size of its body than the Toucan.

You might wonder how it can even lift this extraordinary appendage. Interestingly, the bill is not solid. It is formed of a lattice-work of hollow sections - a little like the inside of a sponge. This means that it can be big and very robust without being heavy.

Even so, when it comes time to rest, the only way a Toucan can get some sleep is to twist its head all the way round and rest its bill out along its back.

A Toucan, Eating Fruit

Toucans Are Good Mimics

Parrots are well known as mimics of human speech. But did you know that Toucans, if kept in captivity, can also pick up quite a wide vocabulary?

As with parrots, this comes from them being social birds that live in dense jungles. Vocal communication between individuals in the flock is very important for recognition and sharing information about where to find food or warnings that a predator is nearby.

Each Toucan recognizes its own parents and group by their specific calls.

Toucans don't make good pets. They require very specialist care and lots of space to live happily in captivity.

But talking of parrots...

3. Parrots. Parlez-vous Parrot?

Parrots are very intelligent and adapt easily to interaction with humans, especially where they have taken to living alongside humans in urban parks.
Parrots are very intelligent and adapt easily to interaction with humans, especially where they have taken to living alongside humans in urban parks. | Source

"Alex and Me" by Dr. Irene Pepperberg

Dr. Pepperberg's talking parrot, Alex, is probably one of the most famous parrots of all time.

After he died, at the age of thirty-one, Dr. Pepperberg wrote a book about her experiences with him. It's called 'Alex and Me.' It isn't just a fascinating book of science but a beautiful account of a personal friendship.

According to the book, the last words they shared together were:

"You be good. I love you," Alex said.

"I love you too."

"You'll be in tomorrow?"

"Yes, I'll be in tomorrow."

Talking Parrots

From the famous literary pirate Long John Silver's parrot squawking 'Pieces of eight, pieces of eight' to the super brainy parrot, Alex - that the scientist Irene Pepperberg taught to identify fifty different objects and ask for them in English whenever he wanted one - parrots are well known for their intelligence and chatty nature!

But did you know that parrots can also learn to count, recognize and name different colors and shapes and even be trained to perform simple household chores?

Scientists such as Dr. Pepperberg now believe that these parrots don't just mimic human speech but can learn to use it with the same understanding as a two-year-old child.

Not everyone agrees with her interpretation but it is a fascinating and fun idea.

It is certainly food for thought. After all, why should we imagine that we are the only animals that have evolved intelligence? Quite clearly lots of other animals have. Not the sort that could get them a degree from Harvard, of course - but maybe more than we might have realized.

Here's a cool video of her and Alex doing their thing...

Dr Pepperberg and Alex

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

Not all these intense relationships develop only between owners and their captive birds.

There is one example of the extraordinary bonds that can be formed between humans and wild birds, too.

Check out this astonishing true story of the wild parrots of Telegraph Hill...

4. Tinamous.

What do you mean, you've never heard of Tinamous?

Don't worry, not many people have!

So far the birds we've looked at have all been interesting and fun because of how well they have adapted but these next guys are more like the clowns at the circus than the amazing acrobats or the mystifying magic act.

Picture of a Tinamous

The tearaway Tinamous is a shy bird and easily panicked. They fly fast but erratically and often put themselves in more danger than the danger they were trying to escape from.
The tearaway Tinamous is a shy bird and easily panicked. They fly fast but erratically and often put themselves in more danger than the danger they were trying to escape from. | Source

Tinamous: Shy Birds That Panic

The Tinamous are a very timid creature. It is rarely seen as it is also very well camouflaged. They tend to creep about at ground level keeping out of everyone else's way. But...

... if one is disturbed, boy is it disturbed.

Once they know they have been spotted, they tend to panic. They shoot upwards in a manic, high-speed flight. And they can go really fast. Unfortunately, they tend not to look where they are going.

Many Tinamous, once panicked, fly straight into the nearest tree and... bam! kill themselves outright.

While they can fly fast, they can't fly for long. They're related to Ostriches, which are completely flightless.

When they tire, they drop back to the ground and carry on running. Unfortunately, they sometimes land on water and... well, you guessed it - they can't swim.

Poor Tinamous. Still, they are a family of birds that evolved about 100, 000 years ago and they're still around, so I guess they must be doing something right!

5. Ostrich

The Ostrich is the largest living bird and, while it can run up to 60 miles per hour, it is completely flightless.
The Ostrich is the largest living bird and, while it can run up to 60 miles per hour, it is completely flightless. | Source

Big Bird

Is BIg Bird related to the Ostrich?
Is BIg Bird related to the Ostrich? | Source

Ostrich: That's One Big Chicken!

Okay, of course all birds are related on the evolutionary tree of life, but ostriches and chickens are only very distant cousins.

Maybe they are more closely related to Big Bird from Sesame Street. They are certainly big.

Ostriches tend to look down on humans - from a height of about nine feet!

They can run up to 60 miles per hour.

Not only are they tall and fast but they are also pretty darned heavy, weighing in at a hefty 350 pounds.

The shell of an ostrich egg is about six times thicker than a chicken egg and an adult human could stand on one without it cracking.

So they are big and fast and heavy.

Buy they're not so smart.

In fact, an ostrich's brain is even smaller than its eye.

Oh. and just in case you're wondering...

... no, they don't really stick their heads in the sand!

An Ostrich Egg

Ostrich eggs are big. Omelette anyone? Hey, invite the whole family!
Ostrich eggs are big. Omelette anyone? Hey, invite the whole family! | Source

6. Madagascan Elephant Bird

Well, if you thought the Ostrich was big, how about the Madagascan Elephant Bird?

Somewhat resembling an ostrich in body shape, this feathered giant really was as big as an elephant, growing up to eleven and a half feet tall.

They must have made quite a sight, stalking on those huge legs through the dense Madagascan Jungle.

Madagascar

A markermadagascar -
Madagascar
get directions

Madagascar was once home to the largest bird that ever lived. Unfortunately they were hunted to extinction by the end of the sixteenth century.

Despite their great size and fearsome appearance, they were actually quite harmless vegetarians, grazing on leaves and herbs.

Unfortunately, these astonishing beasts were hunted to extinction by the end of the sixteenth century.

So, all we have left to show, are some bones. By they are mighty impressive bones at that!

Don't you think they look like dinosaurs?

Elephant Bird Skeletons

Hunted to extinction, only these skeletons of the magnificent Elephant Birds of Madagascar now remain.
Hunted to extinction, only these skeletons of the magnificent Elephant Birds of Madagascar now remain. | Source

7. The Bee Hummingbird

So let's go from the very big to the very small.

The bee Hummingbird is the smallest bird that has ever existed.

It has not been hunted to extinction (not much meat on it I guess).

The Smallest Bird in the World

The tiny Bee Hummingbird, the smallest bird in the world.
The tiny Bee Hummingbird, the smallest bird in the world. | Source

Facts About the Bee Hummingbird

The bee hummingbird hails from the island of Cuba.

It is really tiny and while not quite as small as a bee, has an overall length from the tip of the bill to the tip of the tail of a minuscule 2 inches - that's about 5 centimeters!

This little fella doesn't weigh much as you can imagine. In fact, it weighs about the same as two dimes held in the palm of your hand. That's about 0.07 ounces or just 2 grams.

But it does everything that its larger cousins do well, the thing that hummingbirds are most famous for - it flaps its little wings at about eighty beats per second. That's right, per second.

It can hover and switch up, down, left and right - even fly backwards - with mathematical precision.

Quite the little guy, don't you think?

Bee Hummingbird Flying and Nesting

8. The Wandering Albatross

The Wandering Albatross is the largest living flying bird.

An adult male weighs about 25 pounds - that's the size of a Thanksgiving turkey.

It has a wingspan of twelve feet. So an adult human could lie down under the outstretched wing and be completely covered.

Individual birds are also very long lived. The typical age for an albatross to reach is about seventy or more years.

Young Wandering Albatross in Flight

When an albatross leaves the nest it spends the first seven years of its life flying out at sea.
When an albatross leaves the nest it spends the first seven years of its life flying out at sea. | Source

They fly over distances of up to six hundred miles in one day.

When the young albatross leaves the nest for the first time, it will spend at least seven years flying out at sea before returning to land for the first time. During that maiden flight, a typical albatross will cover something close to one and a half million miles.

In its lifetime, an albatross will normally cover fifteen million miles - the equivalent of flying to the moon and back eighteen times!

In recent years, their numbers have been rapidly declining, putting them on the Red List for conservation status. Their decline is due to over fishing the oceans by humans.

Will anything survive our greed?

Albatross: The Biggest Flying Birds

9. Eurasian Eagle Owl

Not all birds can be readily seen during the day.

Of the night birds, owls are probably the most well-known.

And of the owls, the Eurasian Eagle Owl is undoubtedly the biggest and most impressive.

They can have a wingspan of up to five and a half feet and weigh in at a cool seven pounds. Despite this great size, however, they can fly silently, gliding on their outstretched wings.

Eurasian Eagle Owl

The Eurasian Eagle owl is the largest of the many owl species.
The Eurasian Eagle owl is the largest of the many owl species. | Source

In most species, the male is usually bigger than the female but not so with the Eurasian Eagle Owl. The female is always bigger - sometimes as much as three times bigger - than the male.

One of the owl's distinctive features is the presence of little 'horns' or 'ears' sticking up from the top of its head. These are actually neither ears nor horns! They are simply tufts of feathers and while there are several theories about why they are there - from an aid to camouflage to an attempt to look more frightening to aggressors - nobody really knows what they are for!

Now watch this AWESOME video of an Eagle Owl flying...

Eagle Owl Flying - Awesome!

10. Puffins - Clowns of the Sea!

So here we are near the end of our fascinating and fun facts about birds.

Most people think of birds as living in trees or at least making their homes and nests in them.

But we've already seen that they also live out at sea and in the desert where there are very few trees of any kind.

The Puffin lives on remote northern islands where there are no trees at all.

Puffin

The Puffin is an extraordinary bird but sadly threatened by human over-fishing of the seas.
The Puffin is an extraordinary bird but sadly threatened by human over-fishing of the seas. | Source

They make their homes and nests in deep underground burrows - just the same as rabbits!

And just like rabbits, they tend to make these burrows together in huge colonies.

They are often called 'clowns of the sea' but that's not because they are especially funny in the way they behave but because of their brightly colored bills, which have reminded people of clown make-up.

Now watch this cute video of Puffins popping in and out of their burrows.

Puffins in Burrows

Bird Poll

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Find out more about birds...

I hope that you've enjoyed reading these top ten fun and interesting facts about birds as much as I have writing about them!

I've done some more research for you and found some cool sites and other resources you can check out if you want to find out more about the fascinating world of birds - they are amazing aren't they?

You can find these resources below. Just click through to whatever interests you most.

Oh, and before you go, just fly over to the poll there at the right and cast your vote!

One Question Quiz


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© 2013 Amanda Littlejohn

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    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      What a wonderful hub!!I lov eanything to do with animals/nature etc and this gem was indeed a treat.

      Voted up and shared.

      Eddy.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hi Eiddwen!

      Thank you for your lovely comment. I'm happy that you enjoyed this hub. Hey and thanks for the votes and sharing - that's lovely!

      Bless you :)

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 4 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi Amanda. I must say this is excellent. For just starting our here on HubPages you are off to a rousings start, well done. As you may know I also have a thing for our featherd friends so I found this very interesting and educational. Voted up, shared, pinned.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hey Bill,

      Thanks for reading this and for your lovely comments! I hope this wasn't too easy-going for you - your hubs are just fantastic and so full of detailed knowledge.

      I spent quite a while reading through the Learning Center here before I started my first hub because I wanted to try to get things right. Truth is I'm still reading it!

      I'm really looking forward to reading more of your stuff and thanks so much for the votes and all - it's so encouraging!

      Bless you :)

    • wetnosedogs profile image

      wetnosedogs 4 years ago from Alabama

      Wow, you put a lot of work into this and it is so interesting. I sure did learn a lot about these birds.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hi wetnosedogs!

      Thank you for your kind comments, how lovely - I am happy that you enjoyed this. There was quite a lot of research but I really enjoyed it so it was fun and satisfying to do.

      Bless you :)

    • Insightful Tiger profile image

      Insightful Tiger 4 years ago

      Another very interesting hub that I want to read from start to finish!

      The toucan was very interesting. Poor thing has to put his beak behind him to sleep!

      I just think the owl is so beautiful!

      Thanks for sharing! I'll be pinning this one on my animal's board :)

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hi Michelle!

      Thanks. I'm so happy that you enjoyed this and I share the 'wow' factor that you get from owls, for sure. Beautiful creatures they are.

      Thanks for the 'pin.' I'm really gonna have to get to grips with the social media thing. I got as far as Twitter. Maybe Pinterest should be next. Reading about it in The Learning Center...

      Thanks again. Bless. :)

    • profile image

      priya 4 years ago

      Thanks,its so interesting

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hi priya and thank you so much for leaving your comment!

      I think birds are very interesting, too and I'm glad you enjoyed this article.

      Bless you :)

    • profile image

      nikhil 4 years ago

      its good but not the best

    • profile image

      NIKHIL sheoran 4 years ago

      I think birds are amazing as they have hollow bones to fly

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 4 years ago

      Hi Nikhil,

      Thanks for your comments! Yes, birds do have many adaptations based around their ability fly, such as 'pneumatic' or hollow bones - they also have a bones structure in which many of the bones are fused together for stability and so on.

      Thanks for saying that this article is good and if you think it isn't the best, I would really find it helpful if you could tell me what it's missing - so I can make it better!

      Happy you enjoyed it anyway and thanks for commenting.

      Bless you :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      So well done. Although I enjoy them all, my favorite is probably the hummingbird. Voted up and more.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi FlourishAnyway!

      Thanks so much for your comment. I have to say that hummingbirds really are astonishing, aren't they? Totally amazing and beautiful. Although I do like crows, too - they are so darned smart.

      Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment.

      Bless you :)

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Such a beautiful and informative article. I watched each and every video and went so well with your explanations. I used to watch the roadrunners cartoons, they were so funny. The one about the parrots was so adorable and really very sad. It's nice to know that we can communicate with birds in more ways than we realize.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi grand old lady!

      Thank you so much for your kind and generous comment.

      I'm so happy that you enjoyed this hub and the videos - I took great care in choosing them so it's nice to know that they compliment the text well.

      I love birds and I'm happy to promote their interests!

      Bless you :)

    • Dbro profile image

      Dbro 3 years ago from Texas, USA

      Loved this hub. Just a question, though. You say the wandering albatross is the largest flightless bird, but then you go on to talk about their flight. I'm thinking you meant it is the largest bird that flies. Either way, this was a great hub.

      I'm an artist, and I frequently paint birds. In fact, I just finished a pair of flamingos in watercolor.

      Thanks again for this informative article!

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi Dbro - thank you so so much for your comment!

      I've corrected the error you pointed out. Of course, you are quite right - I meant the largest flying bird as opposed to flightless (which would be the ostrich) I'm so appreciative when an oversight like that is pointed out - thank you indeed!

      I'm always in awe of talented visual artists - it must be wonderful to have those skills. Thanks again for your generous words.

      Bless you :)

    • profile image

      raffy batalo 3 years ago

      what a wonderful article; i enjoyed ready this. I also learned a lot of things about birds. Now i can finally answer our thesis. xD

      -thanks :))

    • profile image

      LIKE 3 years ago

      NIEC WORK YOU DONE NICE INFORMATION

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi raffy,

      Thanks so much for your kind comments! And I'm delighted that you not only enjoyed the article but also found it useful - that's great.

      Bless you and good luck with the thesis! :D

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi LIKE - what a great name!

      Thank you so much for your kind comment. I'm delighted that you enjoyed it.

      Bless you. :D

    • profile image

      kspriya 3 years ago

      Very attractive and informative write-up. Specially the information in "Did you know... box is very interesting. Great Job!!! Love to see more of such hubs.

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      Kids, and adults too will surely find this a fun read!

    • wqaindia profile image

      Ashok Goyal 3 years ago from Rajpura 140401 Punjab India

      What a splendid hub. Recommended to be read by kids and only kids at ShortInspirationStories.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      What an excellent and interesting hub!

      This is so informative and well researched and I learnt so much about birds today.

      Thanks for sharing and congratulations for a well deserved HOTD!

    • amiebutchko profile image

      Amie Butchko 3 years ago from Warwick, NY

      Great coverage of a very interesting species! I am going to read a few times to soak up all the fun facts!

    • Danida profile image

      Danida 3 years ago from London

      I love learning about birds! Right now mammals dominate the planet, but millions of years ago after the dinosaurs died out, it was the birds that rules the earth!

      Very interesting hub! :)

    • BNadyn profile image

      Bernadyn 3 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida

      Useful hub, fun and interesting facts about birds. All the videos were a good addition. Congrats on HOTD!

    • Howard S. profile image

      Howard S. 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas, and Asia

      Interesting. I don't want to blatantly promote my own hubs here, but I think you will find my three on megapodes to be quite compatible and linkable to this, including scientific facts and original line drawings to color. They do not automatically link at the bottom of yours because we chose different breadcrumb categories; megapodes are endangered and not suitable as pets.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Mindi, I'm back to pin this and to say congratulations on HOTD. This was a very entertaining and educational hub.

    • QuestionandAnswer profile image

      Bex Walton 3 years ago from Kent, UK

      I don't have any children but that doesn't stop me finding this interesting and a real entertaining treat. Congratulations on being Hub of the Day - well deserved.

    • dontaytte profile image

      dontaytte 3 years ago from Palos Hills

      Great hubs for all bird lovers

    • Bishop55 profile image

      Rebecca 3 years ago from USA

      I really enjoyed this. Nice job! It was funny and interesting, and had lots of useful content. Voted up.

    • ravi1991 profile image

      Ashutosh Tiwari 3 years ago from Lucknow, India

      Great organization and articulation of the ideas !

      Well done !

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Thank you everyone for all your kind comments and congratulations on this HOTD. I do SO appreciate it and only wish I could reply individually as I usually do - but for all kinds of reasons I have to be away from the computer for a while (a friend in need, in short) but I WILL get round to 'seeing' you all as soon as I can!

      Thank you again - what a lovely, supportive community you are.

      Bless you all. :D

    • profile image

      KynaMavies 3 years ago

      I really likes this, found it very interesting! I saw this video today on different birds http://youtu.be/NEFdCnax2LE which you might find interesting too :)

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 3 years ago

      Hi KynaMavies!

      Thanks for your comment and I'm so pleased that you enjoyed this exploration of fun and interesting facts about birds.

      And thanks for the video link, too. There's some great footage there - once you get through all the ads and intro.

      Bless you :)

    • profile image

      KynaMavies 3 years ago

      Thank you :)

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      Poor tinamous! You have me wanting to learn more about its life. Thanks for a neat read.

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 2 years ago

      Hi Kyna!

      You're welcome. :)

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 2 years ago

      Hi RTalloni!

      Yes, the tinamous really do bring trouble on themselves but as I say, they have survived as a species for a long, long time so somehow they must be doing something right, I guess!

      Thanks for your comment. Bless you :)

    • profile image

      goutham 23 months ago

      well,that was just so great.soo glad to know about those crazy birds thx #stuff4kids

    • stuff4kids profile image
      Author

      Amanda Littlejohn 23 months ago

      Hi goutham!

      Thanks so much for your kind comment. I'm delighted that you enjoyed reading about the birds.

      Bless you :)

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