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Veterinarian in Costa Rica-Dogs

Updated on May 6, 2013
Mona, the dog.
Mona, the dog.

Upon arriving at out jungle property in Costa Rica, we were immediately informed that the adopted 'farm' dog was in heat.

Man...what were we going to do? I did not know a vet or much Spanish either.

Fortunately, the ex-pat folks in town who run the spay and neuter program a few times a year informed us that Dr. Andreas was who we needed to call. He worked for the Veterinaria Garrapata(The Tick Vet!) in a town not too far away.

We were informed that the vet would come to us and do the surgery at our place. Most folks in Costa Rica don't take their pets to the vet. The vet usually comes to them as most don't have cars and you don't really want to take your pet to see the doc in a cab, on a bus or by bike.

I fumbled through my directions to the farm and were happy to know that he'd be there on Wednesday afternoon around 4. Well, in Costa Rica you really never know when or if people would show up when scheduled.

Sure enough, we heard a horn honking and a pick up truck coming up the drive. Following our introductions, Dr. Andreas asked us if we had a table. We had a plastic table inside the porch that we used for breakfast. He thought it would be ok, but he needed more light, so we brought it out to the driveway. His assistant poured some cleaner on the table and disinfected it. He gave the dog an quick exam, asked about her age and health. Before we new it he had injected Mona and she flopped over.

By now the local family had arrived view the surgery.

Mona on the table
Mona on the table
Shaving her belly
Shaving her belly
Surgery begins.
Surgery begins.
Local family looks on.
Local family looks on.

Monkey watch from above.

As the surgery progressed the children were fascinated with the procedure. One was more squeamish than the other, but they seemed to enjoy it all.

As Dr. Andreas was finishing up the sutures, a troop of squirrel monkeys passed through the trees over head. To our amazement, they all stopped to see what was going on. After all, Mona bore a striking resemblance to a large squirrel monkey from their perspective.

Mono Titi(red backed squirrel monkeys) looking on.
Mono Titi(red backed squirrel monkeys) looking on.

The Doc finished up and gave Mona some antibiotics and us some instructions if she didn't heal properly. Then it was time to pay. I braced for a couple hundred dollars. It was a house call, off the beaten path, surgery, exam, medicines. 'Twentry two thousand colones' was the price...yep about $44.00 dollars. What a deal.


Mona healed up perfectly and we have since used Dr. Andreas on a few occasions since, with equally good results. Needless to say, we were pleasantly surprised.

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