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All About Algae Eaters

Updated on June 3, 2008

The Most Beautiful Fish in the World

Welcome to the ultimate algae eater lens! Whether you're a pleco fanatic, an owner of "janitor fish," or have never heard of plecostomus before, this is the page for you.

Here you can learn about: pleco care, types of plecos, and why plecos are the most beautiful fishes in the world!

Wait, what's a plecostomus?

Plecostomus are fishes also known as algae eaters, algae suckers, armored catfish, or just plecos. They are commonly sold as "living janitors" for freshwater aquariums, even though they often make more of a mess than they clean up! There are hundreds of species that get lumped under the "pleco" label, but most are in the family Loricariidae from South America.

Pleco Biology 101

Learn about pleco physiology, behavior, taxonomy, and habitats.

Loricariids (from Loricariidae, the taxonomic family to which plecos belong) can appear primitive with their thick armored plating and cling-on lifestyles, but they are actually fairly advanced fishes whose fossil record dates back to only around 23 million years ago. The jaws of plecos are highly advanced and diverse between species, helping to explain why they don't all consume the same types of algae or why some plecos exhibit more vegetarian tendencies than others.

Pleco Anatomy

While body shape and color are extremely variable among Loricariids, the two constants between all members of the family are armor plates and sucker-mouths. Suction is used to stay attached to objects, but plecos actually scrape algae and detritus off instead of vacuuming it up.

Plecos have eye structures called "iris operculums" that can control the amount of light entering the eye and also disguises the eye-spot that might give their camouflaged bodies away. When the operculum is closed the pupil of a pleco resembles the Greek letter omega, so the completely modified iris is called an "omega iris."

Like many organisms, plecos exhibit sexual dimorphism, or a difference in morphology/appearance between male and female. Many plecos actually have teeth on their skin called "odontodes," and in males they are usually very large and more numerous than in females. Some genera like the Ancistrus sp. plecos have more specific sexual dimorphism. In the case of Ancistrus the males tend to have long, fleshy tentacles on their snouts while females have reduced tentacles or none at all.

Pleco Behavior

A majority of pleco species are territorial and nocturnal. A popular aquarium species that serves as an exception is the Otocinclus catfish. Even small or medium-sized plecos tend to reserve entire tanks for themselves in captivity, so aquarists should beware of adding more than one mature pleco. Territorial fights are more likely with increased age and if both of the plecos are of the same sex.

Plecos primarily originate from fast-moving streams and river basins in Costa Rica, Panama, and South America. Rather than attempting to fight the current in those areas, they instead evolved to latch onto the nearest bit of debris and hang on, and many plecos have trouble swimming once mature. Instead they tend to pull themselves along by their sucker-mouths or "scoot" in little spurts of activity along a given surface. This riverine origin should also be noticed by aquarists, as many pleco species enjoy a current in their tank as well as vigorous filtration.

Plecos have variable diets, but are primarily omnivores. Different genera prefer different ratios of vegetation to meat. For example, Ancistrus are mostly herbivorous while Hypancistrus and Baryancistrus are mostly carnivorous.

Like most fish plecos utilize external fertilization when they spawn. It is typically the male of the species that cares for offspring. He will guard the eggs, turn them over with his mouth, and fan them with his pelvic fins to supply oxygen. Plecos spawn in caves surrounded by mild currents. Some species have males that will continue to guard the offspring as fry (baby fish), and pleco parental instinct tends to be well-developed.

What Are L-Numbers?

If you have ever looked up information about plecos before, you may have noticed aquarists classifying their plecos by an L-number, like L025 for the "red-tailed scarlet pleco" (Pseudacanthicus sp.). L-numbers are the invention of the German aquarium magazine "Die Aquarien und Terrarienzeitschrift (DATZ)," and are used in lieu of scientific names for aquarists to identify plecos. Scientific names are the universal names for species, but in the case of Loricariids (that's where the "L" in the L-number comes from) there are so many species that many have not been assigned a name yet.

The L-number system isn't perfect. For example, the English-language books that were published with L-numbers did not always match numbers to species as the DATZ magazine did. Furthermore, different populations of a single species may be given different L-numbers, or whole genera may be given only a single L-number. However, L-numbers are the closest aquarists can get to a scientific/universal taxonomy for the hundreds of pleco species.

So You Want To Buy a Pleco?

Tips for potential pleco owners.

Warning!

The term "algae eater" isn't really the best one for plecos. Better common names would be "#1 handsome fish" or "grows-to-over-a-foot-long fish." Unfortunately plecos don't all eat the same kinds of algae, and many of them won't even touch the algae in your tank. Thinking that a fish will handle your algae problem for you (and that you don't have to feed it anything else) leads to a lot of plecos starving or outgrowing their tanks. Never buy a small common pleco for your algae problems, and do your research before you buy a difficult or sensitive species.

Even though the common plecostomus (Hypostomus plecostomus) isn't a good choice for most aquarium owners, there are hundreds of pleco species in all different sizes, shapes, and colors! It's a matter of matching your tank and skill level to a species rather than choosing to pleco or not to pleco.

Here are some aquarium parameters you should consider in choosing the right pleco for you:

Aquarium size. I used to work at a pet store in high school, and 10-gallon tanks were easily the most popular sellers. They're cheap and can house a lot of different types of animals. However, you don't want to buy a common plecostomus that grows to over a foot in length for that tank! Good Loricariids for a small tank include Otocinclus catfish (2"), clown plecos (4"), or bristlenose plecos (3"-5").

Maintenance. Do you have a large tank but tend to neglect your regular water changes? Many attractive plecos like the royal pleco grow large (in the royal's case to about 17") and produce a huge amount of waste. Plecos themselves are generally hardy and can tolerate very dirty water, but your other fish are likely to be less healthy when forced to live alongside their grungy neighbor.







pH of Your water. pH is a measurement of water acidity/alkalinity, and different fish have evolved to live in different pH levels. While many plecostomus are hardy and can tolerate significant pH changes, you should not leap into buying a rare species without checking its pH requirements first. 0 on the pH scale is the most acidic, while 14 is the most alkaline. Completely pure water would have a pH of 7.0, but most of us using tap water are going to have variations from that number (usually toward the "hard" or alkaline end, which is the opposite of a typical pleco's natural environment).

To find out the pH of your tap water, pour some into a bucket, leave it overnight, then run a pH test using an aquarium testing kit. Water fresh from the tap is not "settled" the way it would be in your aquarium. For most plecos, your only goal is to provide a stable pH rather than reaching a specific pH value.

Here is a list of some common plecos in order of increasing size:

Otocinclus sp. (otos, otocinclus cats) - 2"

[albino] Ancistrus sp. (albino bristlenose pleco) - 3"

Hypancistrus zebra (zebra pleco, imperial pleco) - 3"

Chaetostoma milesi (rubberlip pleco, bulldog pleco) - 3" to 4"

[L260] Hypancistrus sp. (Queen Arabesque pleco) - 3.5"

Panaque maccus (clown pleco, ringlet pleco) - 4"

Ancistrus sp. (bristlenose pleco, bushynose pleco) - 4" to 5"

Panaque sp. "peckoltia" (tiger pleco, gypsy king tiger pleco, clown pleco) - 6"

[L142] Baryancistrus sp. (snowball pleco, big white spot pleco) - 10" to 12"

Leporacanthicus galaxias (galaxy pleco) - 10" to 12"

Scobinancistrus aureatus (sunshine pleco, goldie pleco) - 10" to 12"

[L18] Baryancistrus sp. (golden nugget pleco) - 14"

Panaque nigrolineatus (gold line royal pleco) - 15" to 18"

Hypostomus plecostomus (common pleco, plecostomus, algae eater, algae sucker, janitor fish) - 18"

Buying your pleco. When you get to the pet store, examine all the tanks before zooming toward the nearest beautiful catfish. Are there a large number of dead fish in the tanks? Are there sick fish still on display/being sold? Sick fish can be identified by the presence of external parasites such as ich (white dots on the surface of the fish), fin rot (degraded fins with a white edge), open wounds, excessive thinness, or erratic behavior (ex. swimming in a continuous circle or bumping into objects).

Is there overcrowding? See if you can spot a series of pipes connecting all the tanks: if you see pipes, all of the water is being exchanged through all of the tanks. That means if there is ich in one tank, it may be passed on to the other tanks. Ask the clerk if any filters or screens are being used. Unfortunately using a water system that exchanges water between every single tank is the only affordable way many pet stores can maintain a freshwater fish section.

If you don't see too many problems, take a look at the pleco you want to buy. Try to pick out a pleco that is actively swimming about and cleaning off objects. Since most pet store specimens are young, they should be quite active even during daylight hours. At the very least the pleco should try to swim/move away if it is disturbed (ask the clerk to use a bag or net handle to agitate the fish).

Your pleco should have clear, non-cloudy eyes and no wounds or rotting fins. Some fin breakage may have occurred from handling or depending on what fish the pleco was kept with. Be aware that many plecos are spiny and have a defense mechanism of erecting their fore (front) fins, which may or may not have spikes on the end. Aside from being a safety hazard, this means they can get caught up in nets or poke holes in bags. Ask for at least a double-bag and newspaper for your pleco, and check to see if you can be indulged with a triple-bag if it is a medium or large-size fish.

Acclimating your pleco. When you get your pleco home, float the bag in your aquarium for about 10 minutes. Move the bag to a bucket or other container and poke a decent-sized hole in the top. Using a paper cup (or a designated aquarium cup), scoop a little water out of your tank and add it to the pleco's bag once every 5 minutes for 20 minutes. You want to avoid getting too much of the pet store's water mixed in with your aquarium water, so when the 20 minutes is up gently pour out the water from your pleco's bag and move the fish either with another bag wrapped around your hand or with a container. Try to avoid nets, which plecos can get stuck in. Gently release the pleco into the aquarium and keep the lights dimmed with little to no activity around the tank until the next day.

I highly recommend using a small quarantine aquarium for at least a month before you move your pleco into your main tank.

Feeding your pleco. Plecos are called "janitor fish" because most species generally have the refuse that other organisms leave behind as their diet. You should however be supplementing your pleco's diet with quality foods like sliced cucumber, zucchini, or melon. You can weigh down a slice of cucumber with a rock or a vegetable clip. Commercial algae tablets and shrimp pellets (alternated, especially for older plecos) also work, but make sure you add them at night so the pleco can find them before your other fish.

Plecos will eat pretty much anything that can fit in their mouths (including your small fish), so it's up to you to give them the right foods to bump into. Most species will feed off driftwood or from algae that lives on driftwood and many require it for a healthy life. When choosing commercial fish foods, take a look at the listed ingredients. If you see "fish meal" or "processed meal," that food is going to be junkier and less nutritious than one that lists "whole salmon." I prefer frozen foods (ex. worms-- pet stores will carry them) for the meat requirements of plecos, and home-cut vegetables for their vegetarian side.

How often should you feed your pleco? Keep in mind that they are grazers ("cows of the aquarium"), and watch the parameters of your tank when you first start maintaining a pleco in it. Very large plecos may only have to be supplemented once or twice a week depending on the water temperature and season, but small species and smaller specimens of large species (say anything under 5") can be supplemented once a day or once every other day.

One of the most interesting behaviors of plecos can occur at feeding time. Some plecos will swim upside-down to feed from the surface at hours they would normally be inactive, and you can also handfeed these individuals and reduce the need for watching the tank to make sure they get what they need. If your plecos figure out this trick, congratulations! Your feeding regimen just got a whole lot easier. =)

Algae Eater Menagerie

Big, beautiful, and bold plecos.

The following is a gallery of a few notable algae eaters. I hope you enjoy the diversity and color of these bodacious cats. =)

The Sexy Pleco Awards - Vote on the plecos in the menagerie - let the most beautiful pleco win!

Who is the prettiest pleco?

See results

  • Plecos in the Panaque genus practice xylophagy, the eating of wood. They are one of the few groups of animals that do so.
  • Plecos have taste buds over almost their entire body and fins.
  • Many plecos can breathe air, including the popular otocinclus cats. The likelihood of a pleco species having this capability depends on whether or not it originates in a low-oxygen environment.
  • Aquarists often refer to plecos as "pl*cos" on forums and newsgroups. This is because once upon a time an aquarist was discussing his pet pleco on a newsgroup and the fish immediately died, so the word has been interpreted as bad luck.

Hollywood Plecos

Pleco Gear - Aquarium tools for taking care of plecos.

Photo Credits

Here are the sites where I got all the wonderful photos for this lens!

Please share your pleco stories, care tips, and feedback for the lens here!

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    • profile image

      john ii 2 years ago

      Add Your Comment.. always wonder why my pleco would settle itself at the water surface with it's entire head sticking out for hours.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thanks :) very nice and informative page ! I love plecos and have one common and one Adonis pleco .. He's pretty too , i would have liked to see a picture of one of them too :P plecos forever <3

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      how long to Plecos live for

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've got an albino bristlenose in my 2.5 gal tank...so far he's living comfortably. He has this strange habit of climbing into the waterfall filter. He jumps in like a salmon and seems to enjoy his time there.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The crayfish probably won't be a good tank mate. You should remove it and get a fish of the same species as his tankmate that passed. Sorry for your loss.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi, I have brislenose plecos which ar ebreeding, never had them before so any help or advise would be appreciated??

    • Caromite profile image

      Caromite 5 years ago

      I love plecos so much! Unfortunately my tanks are too small for most plecos and my water parameters aren't the best for otos.

      Nice lens :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I bought a pair of plecostamus last summer for my pond, I lost my fish from the winter but there hundreds a little plecostamus and I wasn't sure how many a pair normally have.

    • TheZinc LM profile image

      TheZinc LM 5 years ago

      Liking your lens, though the title is slightly misleading.. was hoping to linking your page to my algae info lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      ok like I been having my pleco for 4 years now, his name is HOOVER! recently Hoover lost his tank buddy & he has really been in a funk lately. So my husband has bought a crayfish home & the fight constantly. should we kick the crayfish out or will they eventually become buddies?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens! I love these beautiful fish! I used to own two plecos that were about a foot and a half long each, and one I currently have is about 9 inches. I also used to have a dwarf pleco that was only one and a half inches long as a full grown adult.

    • profile image

      Spikey64 5 years ago

      What a brilliant and beautiful algae eater the pleco is. Gets rid of algae and is a pleasure to look at what more could you want.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Pretty Nice site!!! Im an aquarist and I lOVE my Fish. Im getting a new addition tomorrow...a Pleco about half a foot long. :) I had one a long time ago when i first started the aquarium hobby and he fought through ick. He was such a trooper!! But he Later died...

    • profile image

      Wild_Dogs 6 years ago

      This is an absolutely beautiful study on plecos. You did a great job putting this together. I have two bristle noses in a 36-gallon tank and they are wonderful...so very interesting.

    • profile image

      r2fish 6 years ago

      Nice photos.

    • Charmcrazey profile image

      Wanda Fitzgerald 6 years ago from Central Florida

      Good Lord I hope mine doesn't get a foot long. The pictures of their mouths open above are a great touch. Nice lens.

    • Lironah LM profile image

      Lironah 6 years ago

      Glad I got a Cory instead.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      What a great lense! Thanks for taking the time and writing this.

    • torolevy lm profile image

      torolevy lm 7 years ago

      Love your page! my plec is the star of my tank..along with the clown loaches !

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I had no idea my Pleco would become so huge! She survived Hurricaine Katrina! Lately I have noticed a discoloration on her sharp fin. She is very dark with spots but a section on her fin is a light salmon color. She's a very huge fish in a very small tank. Do I need to treat this?

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I had no idea my Pleco would become so huge! She survived Hurricaine Katrina! Lately I have noticed a discoloration on her sharp fin. She is very dark with spots but a section on her fin is a light salmon color. She's a very huge fish in a very small tank. Do I need to treat this?

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Please tee if you must post a comment, properly state your plural verbs correctly. You just simply refuse to win my friend

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Thank you Aj for your informative comment, i will definitely sex my plecs properly from here on out, but in the mean time you should also spell check your shizznat before you post it. Thank you

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: I understand that the B key is right next to the V key, but please take the time to spell check your comments before you submit them, you lazy bum.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My algae eater has recently grown bery lonely. Less than a week ago, all seven of my other goldfish died and now i noticed my pleco is covered in a thin layer of white. and his eyes are glazed over with this as well. Just wondering if someone can tell me why and if he is dying. Im not sure what to do???

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @EelKat13: The saying actually goes, "keep in mind." Not "keep in mine," like some others would lead you to believe^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^idiot!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @JacquelineM LM: * don't...come on people

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: brit you are also a complete dipshit, you two should meet each other somewhere and learn math/grammar skills together

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: ur an absolute doucher and you should complete the fifth grade grammar lesson on keywords you asshole

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: your tanks are too small you should have a about 1 gallon of what for every inch of fish eg you have 2 1.5 inch fish you need MIN 3 gallon tank

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Great site! I have a Pleco in 55 gallon tank. 9-10" long. Recently lost only other fish in tank [not a pleco] to ick but pleco survived w/ flying colors and cleaned entire tank that night. ?? is: can he survive without another fish messing up the tank and is he going to be lonely?

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I HAVE 2 12 INCH PLECOSAMUS NEED TO GET RID OF ONE GETTING TO BIG FOR BOTH OF THEM IN MY TANK IM IN MICHIGAN jamieadams66@verizon.net

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My pleco was in a 1.5 gallon tank w/ two (YOUNG) goldfish but now i upgraded to a 5 gallon and got rid of my 2 goldfish because they we nasty and i couldn't get any other fish. before i even got the 5 gallon tank my pleco start to stay in a curled to the left position and dosent seem to come out of it. he is only like 1.5 inch very young i think but it seems he is suffering and i am very confused with what is wong with my pleco. please help me with my poor pleco.

    • JacquelineM LM profile image

      JacquelineM LM 8 years ago

      Very informative. I have a 10 gallon with 7 fancy goldfish. My local Wal-mart (don't yell at me), sold me 2 of the small algae eaters they carry. They don't look very healthy now and I'm concerned. I have been giving them algae eater food and they don't want it. Any clue what may perk them up?

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My pleco is the best ever. He is named Manet and is almost 14 inches long (quite a ways to go to be full grown) He lives happily in his tank with Mommy and Baby Guppies. As you well know, most males care for the babies, but this pleco goes the distance; he actually LOVES the baby guppies so much that he lets them hang around him, and he keeps them hidden from their mom's until they are old enough to fend for themselves of be moved to our selective "DADDY" tanks.

    • EelKat13 profile image

      EelKat13 8 years ago

      [in reply to Concerned Caretaker]

      @Concerned Caretaker Like the other poster said, it sounds like ICK. There is medication for it. I'm afraid I don't know much about Plecos, however Goldfish are my area of expertise, and I was wondering, how big a tank have you got? It sounds like overcrowding was the problem. Goldfish require 20gals of tank per Goldfish, so for your 6 Goldfish to survive in one tank, you would have to keep them in a tank of a min 120gals. (Keep in mine that a full grown Goldfish is 10 - 23 inches long depending on breed, and if they don't have enough room to grow they will suddenly "die for no reason" or rather die from staunted growth. The 2 - 3 inch fish you buy in the store are only 3 months old, by the time a Goldfish is 2 years old it will be at least 8 inches long). Overcrowding can cause all kinds of illnesses (including ICK) due to too much waste product in the tank. I think that may have been the problem.

    • EelKat13 profile image

      EelKat13 8 years ago

      I love Plecos, they are so beautiful. I've never raised one though, because, I did do my homework, and thankfully I had a local pet shop with an owner who happened to have a full grown pet Pleco which he kept in a back room (not for sale) and he showed it to me and told me that Plecos need a min 55gal tank if they are going to be happy and healthy. Well, for my fish, I want them to have as close as possible to their natural habitat, including room to swim once they are full grown and where I live I just didn't have room for a 55 gal tank, so I never did get myself a Pleco. Hopefully someday though, because they are such a beautiful fish and I'd love to have a few.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      [in reply to Concerned Caretaker] Ick is probably your problem and it will be the death of your pleco if you don't act fast. Melafix or Malafix I can't remember exactly what it is called (it comes in a blue bottle) or any other Ick medicine should be used according to the instructions on the bottle along with frequent partial water changes.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My algae eater has recently grown bery lonely. Less than a week ago, all seven of my other goldfish died and now i noticed my pleco is covered in a thin layer of white. and his eyes are glazed over with this as well. Just wondering if someone can tell me why and if he is dying. Im not sure what to do???

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      This site gave me plenty of info on plecs i had 2 had to split the m up they started fighting let people know this in your site i saw no mention of it. When plecs get to a sexually mature stage they will fight unless they are only kept together in the breeding season, if you know how to sex a plec then try to keep it to a male and a female, But only keep them together in the breeding season.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I was told there the small tank about 2 feets length doesn't suit for a Sailfin Pleco, which the size can reach about 12 inches or bigger. The small tank will cause this species an early death? Is anyone can share this question? Thank you!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      [in reply to Cinetech] they are cool

    • profile image

      WhippetTalk 8 years ago

      I bought my first Pleco 3 days ago! A bristlenose. I adore it. I tried to feed a slice of cucumber after he cleaned off all the algae growing on the back wall of my tank, but the cucumber slice floats. So I put a rock on it, but the Pleco totally ignored it. I'll try again in a few days.

      I also have a Farlowella.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I've got a sexy pleco, Sef - sexy emo fish.

    • packetlog profile image

      packetlog 8 years ago

      cool. u seem 2 b obsessed with it!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      thanks for this site,,, i just found out that i can feed my plecos some cucumber slice,,,

      i've been thinking of getting rid of my plecos 'coz its scaring my golfishes... now i know wat to do,,,,

    • profile image

      CleanerLife 8 years ago

      Always wanted an aquarium, now I want one with at least one pl*co, even though I never heard of them before reading this Lens!

      Great Job!

    • profile image

      WhippetTalk 9 years ago

      Awesome page! I recently decided to get my very first Aquarium and this page has been very helpful and beautiful. This is definitely a Favorite for me and I will feature it my new lens!

    • cineteq profile image

      John Parr 9 years ago from Montreal

      Wow, you really impressed me! Outstandig content and supporting photos. Didn't know much about these creatures, they're kind of pretty in a strange kind of way...Well done!

    • TonyPayne profile image

      Tony Payne 9 years ago from Southampton, UK

      Very cool lens, love the photo of the giant pleco... 5***** for a great job. I used to have a huge tank with 3 map turtles and a pleco. He used to be crafty enough to avoid them...

    • plecostomus profile image
      Author

      plecostomus 9 years ago

      Those are common plecos, though I don't have a specific L-number for you unfortunately.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      i waswoundering what type of pleco was on the second pic(all or with th 2 huge plecos

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      i found lots of great tips on plecos i got one like 1 week and 3 days the info was great

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 9 years ago

      Great Lens! I love the pictures. Carrieokier is right, you know your stuff.

      5 Stars

      Lizzy

    • RuthCoffee profile image

      RuthCoffee 9 years ago

      Fabulous lens, I learn all kinds of things.

    • WebGazelle LM profile image

      WebGazelle LM 9 years ago

      Lots of great information on Plecos.

    • carrieokier profile image

      carrieokier 9 years ago

      Awesome job on your lens. I loved it! You definitely know your stuff.