ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Bearded Dragon Diseases

Updated on July 24, 2014

Bearded Dragon Diseases and Treatment

Bearded Dragons are very hardy lizards, when they are provided with the proper care and the correct temperatures and lighting in their environment. However, they are also pets who do their best to hide their symptoms from us when they become ill, as do most other reptiles.

Since your Bearded Dragon can't talk or complain about where it hurts, you must use your own observation skills to determine when something is not right. There are times when a healthy Bearded Dragon will act differently, but these changes should be seen for what they are by the experienced veterinarian.

There are many types of Diseases that your Bearded Dragon may get or be exposed to. some of the more common ones that you may encounter are Metabolic Bone Disease,Stomatitis also known as mouth rot,Impaction,Dystocia (Egg Binding) and parasites to name just a few. In most cases of diseases that you may encounter with your Bearded Dragon they can be cured and properly treated if taking to a vet. at the first signs of problems. Keeping weekly records will help spot disease at its earliest stages

Spotting a Bearded Dragons Disease

Be Aware of your Bearded Dragon

Being aware of what normal behavior is for each of your Bearded Dragons, and what is not its normal Behavior. An alert eye can generally spot a problem long before it becomes a major concern. Pay special attention to each Bearded dragon's eating habits, and the amounts that they usually eat,any change it its diet is an early sign of an illness.Attention should also be paid to your Bearded Dragons bowel movements, how often they have a movement and what they usually look like, when they do. Attention should also be paid to the amount of urates (the white solid or powdery materials) that are passed within the bowel movements, as a change in this can be a sign of kidney problems. Any new Bearded Dragons should be quarantined away from any other Bearded Dragons for at least 2 weeks and daily records should be kept for each individual Bearded Dragon.Daily record keeping and proper care will help identify any problems early enough to prevent the disease from getting any worse

Keeping weekly records will help spot disease at its earliest stages

notice how the Bearded Dragons leg is draggin backwards, a healthy dragons foot would be in front supporting him
notice how the Bearded Dragons leg is draggin backwards, a healthy dragons foot would be in front supporting him

Metabolic Bone Disease

MBD is to Common Among Bearded Dragons

Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is a well recognized and all too common disease of Bearded Dragons.MBD results from an improper calcium to phophorus ratio in the body. Normally this ratio should be around 2:1 calcium:phosphorus (in the range of 1:1 to 2:1). When the calcium level is relatively low the body tries to compensate by taking calcium from wherever it can, for example the bones. There is no single cause and the disease is not as simple as a calcium deficiency. However, the primary problem is a disruption of calcium metabolism which causes a host of related problems. MBD is almost always a result of poor husbandry, but generally preventable by providing a proper environment and diet. This is not always easy or inexpensive, but is vital to the health of Bearded Dragons.

Calcium also impacts a number of other physiological systems including muscle contraction (including the heart) and blood clotting. The 2:1 ratio of calcium to phosphorus that is ideal in the diet, but calcium metabolism is not that simple.Other factors like Vitamin D (especially D3) are also vital to calcium metabolism, and because some Bearded dragons do not absorb vitamin D that well they need ultraviolet light exposure to manufacture their own vitamin D. Improper exposure to UVA and UVB will prevent your Bearded Dragon from properly producing its own vitamin D. Other factors may include improper temperatures, not enough proteins or to many oxalates.

Signs and Symptoms:

Vary depending on the severity and length of time the condition has had to developed. Due to the importance of calcium in bone formation and muscle function, most of the signs and symptoms are related to bone and muscle effects. These include:

* tremors

* anorexia

* bowed, or swollen legs, or bumps on the long bones of the legs

* softening and swelling of the jaw (bilateral) - sometimes called "rubber jaw"

* arched spine or bumps along bones of spine

* jerky movements-twitching in the muscles of the legs and toes

* lameness

* fractures of the bones due to bone weakness

* lethargy

* weakness and even partial paralysis (sometimes unable to lift body off ground)

Metabolic Bone Disease is distinctive enough that diagnosis is usually made based on the symptoms, physical exam, and discussion of husbandry. X-rays can be taken to confirm the diagnosis and monitor treatment. Treatment depends on the severity of the disease. For very mild cases a switch to a balanced diet and proper husbandry may be enough, but many cases require intensive calcium and vitamin supplementation under a veterinarian's care.

Bearded Dragon Vitamins And Medicines

Bearded Dragon Disease - Stomatitis

Commonly Known as Mouth Rot

stomatitis, commonly referred to as mouth rot. Although it isn't really a disease, it is a sign of an underlying infection. Bearded dragons with mouth rot will develop a grayish or whitish substance on the soft tissues in their mouth. If the condition is allowed to progress, the teeth will become loose and the gums may start to bleed. The underlying infection needs to be treated, or this condition will keep giving your Bearded dragon problems This condition is characterized by inflammation of the mouth. This usually causes swelling and bleeding of the oral tissues. So, what exactly causes stomatitis in Bearded Dragons?

Bearded Dragons need certain requirements like temperatures and proper diet, when these requirements are lacking the Bearded Dragon will become stressed. Other causes of stomatitis may include parasites,bacteria or an infection.

Signs and syptoms

Stomatitis causes swelling of the mouth and excessive salivation in its early stages but as the disease progresses the Bearded Dragons gums will begin to bleed and the swelling will get worse if left untreated the swelling will get so bad the Bearded dragon wont eat and wont be able to close its mouth, its teeth will loosen and fall out and it can lead to eye problems and other more serious health issues.

Treating Stomatitis in its earliest stages is relatively easy if the Bearded Dragon is took to a Vet. The Vet will have to get a swab of the Bearded Dragons mouth to determine the bacteria or cause of the stomatitis, once the cause is known then the proper treatment of antibiotics, vitamins and food can be prescribed.In the more severe cases of stomatitis surgery may be required

Dystocia (Egg Binding)

Dystocia also known as egg binding occurs most often in first-time breeding females, females who have previously retained eggs, and female bearing infertile clutches. General causes of dystocia may be due to the inability of the eggs to pass through the oviduct and cloaca. There may be an obstruction, the eggs may be too large or not positioned right or there may be obstructive masses such as abscesses or cystic calculi. Two or more eggs may be bound together, or a single egg may be exceptionally large or misshapen.

Dystocias can occur in the absence of obstructions or malformations. Such retentions may be the result of one or more of the following factors including poor husbandry, improper nesting site, improper temperatures, poor or inadequate diet, dehydration, and poor physical condition of the female. This latter is easily caused in, and remedied, in captivity.

Captive Bearded Dragons don't have the muscle strength or tone to get all the eggs into position for laying and expelling them in a timely matter. It is not uncommon for the last egg or two to be retained despite the successful and apparent ease with which the rest of the clutch was expelled.

A proper laying area must be available for the Bearded Dragon female if the laying medium and conditions are not correct she will dig frantically and run around clawing to learn more about Bearded Dragon egg laying.

if the problem persists and the Bearded Dragon has not laid the eggs within 48 hours get it to a vet right away.

Bearded Dragons and Salmonella

All Reptiles can carry Salmonella

Bearded dragons are like any other reptile and they may carry Salmonella. This is a bacterium that causes food poisoning and can sometimes be lethal. This is especially true for children that have an immune compromised condition. Careful handling of the bearded dragon and washing your hands thoroughly followed by using a hand sanitizer will ensure that you remain healthy along with your bearded dragon. Following proper guidelines when keeping and handling Bearded Dragons will prevent most chances of salmonella. Common practices to follow include not allowing Bearded Dragons to have access to the kitchen, dining room, or any other area in which food is prepared. Also, do not allow Bearded Dragons to have access to bathroom sinks and tubs or to any area where infants are bathed. Use a rubber tub for bathing your Bearded Dragon and a separate rubber tub for cleaning purposes. Do not eat, drink, or smoke while handling reptiles, reptile cages, or reptile equipment. Do not kiss reptiles or share food or drink with them. Do not use the same equipment for your animals that you use for yourself. Children should be supervised when they are handling reptiles to ensure that they do not place their hands or objects a reptile has touched in their mouths. Be Smart and keep you and your Bearded Dragon clean and healthy.

Impaction in Bearded Dragons

Blockage of the Digestive Tract

Impaction occurs when the digestive tract of a Bearded Dragon becomes clogged or blocked preventing the Bearded Dragon from passing feces regularly or not at all. Impaction can be caused by several things including feeding to large of food prey not having the proper lighting and temperatures for digesting it food properly. Occasionally the Bearded Dragon may eat a rock or large pieces of sand and they become caught in their digestive tract leading to Impaction as well.

If the Impaction is not that bad using the proper laxatives and warm baths may help solve the problem. your local reptile vet should be able to advise you as to what type of laxatives to use or you can try a few drops of mineral or vegetable oil. if the problem persists and your Bearded Dragon hasn't passed any feces within 48 hours take it to a vet right away

para zap used to treat mites
para zap used to treat mites

Parasites in Bearded Dragons

Mites and Parasites in Bearded Dragons

Bearded Dragons like all other creatures are susceptible to pests like mites and various parasites. Mites and parasites in Bearded Dragons may come from various sources such as insects, vegetables other reptiles, stress and unclean cage conditions to name a few.

When a Bearded Dragon gets stressed its immune system weakens making the conditions right for parasites to develop and thrive.

Bearded Dragons can get stressed easily so providing the proper lighting ,temperatures and feeding schedule is very important.Parasites survive in a Bearded Dragons digestive tract by existing on the food that your dragon eats. They take in the nutrients from the food that your dragon needs to grow and remain healthy. Some parasites, such as hookworms, will even burrow into the walls of your dragon's intestines, and lay eggs there, which will hatch and feed on his blood. A severe infestation of parasites can not only starve your dragon of the nutrients that it needs, but can also make it anemic. The symptoms of parasites include diarrhea, stomach pain, difficulty in digesting food, and may even stop eating. The Bearded dragons immune system will be busy trying to fight off the parasites, and he will become weak, making him susceptible to other infections. He will not grow as he should, nor will he gain weight as he grows. Parasites are not something that you can ignore, and can cause serious, and possibly lasting, problems if left unchecked.

Bearded Dragons with Parasites or mites are easily treated and in most cases preventable with proper husbandry and regular visits to a good reptile vet for a check up

Bearded Dragon Record Keeping

Importance of Keeping Daily and Weekly Records

Keeping regular records of your Bearded Dragons daily activities is very important. I will keep a clipboard attached to each cage if keeping more than one Bearded Dragon. Record The Dragons Name,its Genetics especially if you plan on Breeding your Bearded Dragon.Daily Records should include daily feedings and keep a count on what you feed your Bearded Dragon and how much they eat at a time. keep track of when you dust a feeding with calcium or any vitamins or medications that are being taken.Also record daily bowel movements as a lack of bowel movements is a sign of problems. Baby and juvenile bearded dragons will need to have daily records and weekly weightings and measurements. An adult Bearded Dragon wont need to be weighted or measured but every other week to monitor any changes. Pay close attention to any actions or behaviors that are not normal for your Bearded Dragon by keeping regular records you will be able to notice any diseases early enough to get the proper care and treatment for your Bearded Dragon

Bearded Dragon Featured Breeder - Moonstone Dragons offers High Quality Dragons

Orange Translucent Male Available For Sale
Orange Translucent Male Available For Sale

Moonstone Dragons is the featured Breeder for Bearded Dragons offering only the Best of the Best when it comes to Bearded Dragons. Moonstone Dragons is owned and operated by Mark Romansky who is a private hobbyist breeder of unusual snakes and high colored bearded dragons. Marks goal is not just to produce reptiles, but to produce outstanding dragons and snakes, and then make them available to other breeders and hobbyists. All of Moonstone's dragons are "hand raised". All are handled on a daily basis. making them more calm and gentle natured.

Moonstone Dragons offer only the highest quality of Bearded Dragons . Visit Moonstone Dragons and see what Mark has available now.

Bearded Dragon Diseases

Preventable with Proper Care

Bearded Dragons diseases in most cases can be prevented or cured with the proper care. By providing the proper UVA/UVB lighting and by providing the proper temperature gradients for thermal regulation. A well balanced diet that includes insects, vegetables and the proper vitamins. A clean cage environment is essential for your Bearded Dragons overall health.

Be aware of your Bearded Dragons eating habits and other activities such as basking, drinking how regular does it pass feces. Keeping a good daily record of your Bearded Dragons activities along with charting its weight and size growth, how much and often it eats. keep track of vitamins , temperatures and any other things you may notice. this may seem like a lot of work but with a little extra effort you will have a healthier Bearded Dragon.

A Healthy Dragon is a Happy Dragon

Please feel free to ask Questions or suggestions on caring for sick Bearded Dragons. I am not a Vet but I care about My Bearded Dragons Health and don't mind taking the time to give my Bearded Dragons the care that they need.

A Healthy Dragon is a Happy Dragon !!!

Bearded Dragon Diseases Questions or Coments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      anjyu1995 3 years ago

      @020272: I'm no expert so other members may have more to contribute than myself however I volunteered in a reptile centre for a while during college and from what I learned it sounds like your dragon has mites, in fact of all the information I'm about to give you this is the information I am most confident about, assuming it is mites, they will look like black specs on your dragon, in which case I'd clean the enclosure EVERY day until the mites are gone and for a little while after (about a week) I'm talking complete cleaning, meaning changing the sand, or whichever bedding you have, every day and for extra precaution using a pet-friendly cleaning spray to clean the inside of the viv. As for the dragon, give him a warm bath (when I say warm I mean lukewarm or muggy warm as if the water had been left in the viv overnight) and using a toothbrush (a new one, not one that's been used) and just gently brush the mites off every day, I've also heard putting a bit of 'reptile relief' on a cotton bud (I think they're called q-tips in america) and using that to brush off the mites speeds up the process.

      as for the dragon being malnourished, make sure if it's a younger dragon it has mostly crickets, meal worms etc and a bit of veggies and if older mostly veggies with some meal worms etc and put calcium dust on the crickets and veggies,

      "Dust with calcium 5x a week and use a multivitamin 2x a week. The easiest way to remember is to use calcium every week day and multivitamin at the weekends. Nutrobal is a good multivitamin (contains Vitamin D3) but this should not be used everyday as they do obtain D3 from their UVB light and too much can cause problems." -cherrypie from yahoo answers.

      this is the rule I always went by.

      doing this and removing the mites should have him back in no time, if he's still ill when the mites are completely removed take him to your local reptile store or vets.

      hope this helps.

    • profile image

      anjyu1995 3 years ago

      @020272: it sounds to me like your dragon has mites, when I used to volunteer at the reptile shop in my local area they would give the dragon a warm bath, let him drink etc, then use a product like 'reptile relief' and just put a little bit on a q-tip and rub it onto the mites then wash it off and most of them should come off with it, then use a toothbrush (one that's never been used and make sure everyone knows it's intended for getting mites off) and gently brush your dragon off with the toothbrush, if you don't feel confident enough to use the 'reptile relief's just skip that part and simply brush the mites off, either way you will need to (and want to) do it daily as well as clean the vivarium every day, I'm talking complete sand change (or whatever bedding you have) and wash the viv out using a pet-friendly cleaning product.

      good luck, hope this helps

      P.S this isn't the only method of getting rid of them but it is my preferred method.

    • profile image

      cameron-danna 3 years ago

      I have a female beardie that is two years old and a couple of weeks ago had played eggs and is pukeing up brown saliva I'm worryed

    • profile image

      vivienord13 3 years ago

      Hi. I have a 9 month old baby bearded dragon. He is 9 months old and smaller than my hand. When i got him he was eating well, one day i put him in a bathtub and he started running in a circle and he started pooping smelly brown poop and his normal poop color is black and white. Now he only eats 1-2 mealworms a day and a little bit of carrots. What's wron with him? Please reply.

    • profile image

      patricia-karbowski 3 years ago

      I bought a baby beardy in Sept. He was lazy and didn't eat well. His eye and nose looked swollen. I treated it as a bite and got the swelling down. Also his lips were red. I thought it was healing but the upper lip is red and looks like it has been bleeding.I don't leave crickets in his cage, so it's not that. I'm considering renaming him Harry, because now it looks like a hair lip. Help!

    • profile image

      da_lord 3 years ago

      I HAVE A MALE DRAGON WHO IS ABOUT A YEAR,I WOKE UP AND HE HAD DEVELOPED A KIND OF WART ON HIS SHOULDER THAT LOOKS LIKE A SMALL PIECE OF GENRAL TOAST CHICKEN I DIDN'T KNOW WHAT IT WAS I FEED HIM MOSTLY VEGGIES AND CRICKETS(THAT ARE DUSTED)HE IS STILL ACTIVE AND LOVES TO EAT HIS FECES HAS BEEN A KIND OF RUNNY THE LAST 5 TIMES BUT THE WART HAS JUST CAME YESTERDAY

    • profile image

      letitiajones 3 years ago

      I have female dragon who is about 4 years old. She has started to make this sound like something is in she thoat. I have open her mouth and I see nothing there. She is eating and moving around. Should I take her to the vet.

    • profile image

      020272 3 years ago

      Hi I brought a dragon and he is very malnourished and has little black spots on his body has nothing to do with his colour. As well as he seems to be itchy. Got any suggestion on how to make. Him healthy

    • profile image

      abk41591 3 years ago

      @anonymous: All beardies have different personalities.... so this is prob ok just make sure she eats every day and poops and let her soak in a bath every other day but like i said all beardies have their own personalities....

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Hi I have a 2 beardies. 1 is a male about 3 months old he is thriving and doing great. In the same enclosure I have a female about 4 months old. Since I have owned her she has always been a bit slow. She will move if need be but compared to my male she lays around more than 1/2 the time. I feed them a variety of foods from meal worms, phenix worms to super worms along with their daily greens. She seems to have started shedding but the last few days has only eaten 5-6 worms a day and very little green. She seems to sleep a lot more than he does too but she always has. She seems to skinny to me but I'm wondering if its just her shed? There is NO twitching and temperature is 105 degrees in basking spot. What else can I do for her? I'm worried she is ill and I just am not seeing it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      We have a dragon and it has preferated his bowl why has this happened and would it servive

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Okay, my Izzy is about 9 months old. Perfectly healthy until a few weeks ago she slowed down her eating. I kept an eye on her, but as she got more lethargic I took her to the vet. (This was yesterday) They think she has MBD but she isn't showing symptoms of it except for lack of appetite and lethargy.

      This morning she got the droopy eyelids. She didn't move around in her bath like she normally would, although she did eat two medium dubia roaches and about 15 mealworms.

      She is refusing veggies so I've been force feeding a squash smoothie mix with a syringe. I'm worried it may be low vitamin A or Calcium levels in her blood, or possibly dehydration.

      There isn't a good herp vet within a three hour radius of me so I'm looking for all the help I can find. Any suggestions? I can't lose this little girl..She is my world.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      I don,t own a bearded dragon, bur my friend owns a monitor, and he told me they die quickly if they have cuts( not satin they do die I mean might) and if anything is wrong calla vet

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      hello ,my name is sarah,i have a male bearded dragon,once in a while he will open his mouth and puff his beard out and twist his neck and his body. what's going on with him?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hello my name is Emma and our family just inherited two Pygmy dragons! One of them has limp legs and can't walk very well, it drags itself around? It can move its limbs but can't use them to walk poor little thing :( as I said we rescued them and don't know if something happened to it! Is this something that could be fixed by a vet?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      yaak! i hate it..

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I would definitely recommend everything they say on this website . Currently my beardie is in critical care in the vets for calcium deficiency . He may have broken bones . I have been told he has a 25% chance of pulling through and living . Please check them everyday . It is so important . My beardie showed no signs up till now and now it may be too late :(

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: U should know better than to feed any reptile sumthing to big....

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi I am very scared. I own a baby bearded dragon. I have only had him 3 days. And I was looking at him and he started shaking and threw up a large red something Idk wat it is and it's a Saturday vets don't open till Monday. Idk wats going on or wat happened to him please anyone help. I'm scared.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Im so upset ! This morning my bearded Dragon developed a hole in his back It id deep and bleeding now tonight but this morning it was an oozing a white/clear substance. I took Flash out and ran water over the hole to wash it out but no change its still bloody.what can i do with Flash now until i go to vets Monday or can i treat this problem myself

      ?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: If its a juvenile dragon don't put sand put the carpet that they sell in stores and abou the not eating part make sure it has the right lighting it helps the digestion

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My 4month old beardy is twitching threw all of its body and hardly ever eats any more and when he does twitch it's threw out its entire body non stop and it look like its going to die I don't know what to do and it does recover but still happens what do I do

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My Bearded dragon has not eaten in almost a week, last thing was unfortunately a little big for him. Now he is not moving much, he will lift all four legs and shake, like he is trying to make a movement. Has not been able to. I gave him a warm bath, rubbed his belly. Attempting veg oil now. I have a tank though with sand and I think it is hard for him to walk in it. I do not have funds to buy anything else so just curious what types of things I can put in tank and or do for him. I will go to vet on Mon. but to make it through weekend, what can I try?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My bearded dragon has been sheding and today I have noticed her front foot on the bottom has bright orange spots, is this normal? She is about 4 months old.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My dragon is about 7 months old his leg seems to be hurt or hard to use it im very worried comments or opinions would help thanks my name is laura

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      my red desert bearded dragon i got about 5 months ago stopped shedding its skin and it hasn't shed its skin more than once in the 5 months ive had it i can't find any disease that may have caused this or an website that has a similar problem please help

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Is it normal for bearded dragons to have a light green in his one foot he has?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My beardie has had some off white-yellowish stuff on his head. Not sure what that is. Also, now it has some redish/brownish stuff on its mouth. I've googled and bing'd but can't find anything. Anyone have some direction for me? Thank you! :)

    • profile image

      dongfeb2012 5 years ago

      I love my breadie and so glad to find this lense.

    • DeniseDurham2011 profile image

      DeniseDurham2011 5 years ago

      Great lens! Thanks for putting so much information all together.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      It appears that my bearded dragon's bowels are outside of its body. I don't know yet if my pet is a male or female...what can I do? I have an appointment with the vet and I'm worried that my pet won't make it through the night...what is happening to my pet??

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      My 8mos old BD had metabolic bone dis. In its early stage. It was caught early, she improvong since we got the right light and calcium drops. But she's always sticking out her stuck like it hurts. I saw a white blister in ther n there's alittle whiteness along the gum lines. We brought her to vet 2x cux of the metallic bone dis, when we called dr about tongue he said oh just keep her in sun. We have its still here. She sticks it out rolls it around u no she's in pain.a wk b 4 we found out about the MBD,my husband started her on lg crickets. They were huged. Do u since her gums r still soft during that time these lg cricket bit her inside? I know she's hurtin I see whiteness in there blister we are handfeeding her kale peas worm but we have to put it in her mouth or she wouldn't eat, I have noticed once she ate 1 thing on her own since. Is there a disease of the mouth they can get or do u thinking giving these bg crickets played apart. My husband. Also puts the vitaminc c right in her mouth which might b burning her. Idk we don't have $ to bring her again. Putting her in sun helps her overall health but not this tongue thing please could u asnwer me bk.(U should know she got MBD cus dumb husband has wrong lites 4 mos. And stopped putting calcium on the cricket. The vet gave us vit c in dropper. I saw a tiny white blister along the gumline and at first her tongue was red and purple at first pls heeeelp! Tk u whoever u r. Pls tell me you've heard of this. Thank u!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      my beadie he wont eat and he wont open his eyes and theres discharge in both eyes

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hey, I have a 9 year old Bearded Dragon and he has not eaten in about 2 months. I have tried all his favorites, even squash baby food. His bone structure seems fine and I can not palpate any type of abnormalities in his abdomen. He still will walk around (inside and outside) and drinks just a little bit of water. When I do try to feed him he just "closes" his eyes. There is not discharge from his mouth or eyes.. please if you have any suggestions I would love to hear back from you.. Thanks again, Kitty

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi, over the last two days, my two year old dragon's back right leg has turned grey. She is a healthy dragon and eats and passes regularly. She is not dragging her leg and is quite active in and out of the viv. Shes a sandfire dragon and is bright orange so I don't understand why her one leg has gone grey

    • wadsworth lm profile image

      wadsworth lm 5 years ago

      Very informative lens, thanks.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      What do u do when ur dragon becomes nocturnal?

    • Blackspaniel1 profile image

      Blackspaniel1 5 years ago

      Nice lens.

    • markettrol profile image

      markettrol 5 years ago

      My neice and her son have a bearded dragon.....I noticed you did not talk about hiberation

      My neice took their beardie to the vet and he was not sure, but thought that her may want to hiberate...I know they do not call it hiberation...braunation or something like that....Have you ever heard this???

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi I'm having a problem with my beardie he's about 3 1/2 I've had him since he was a baby.. But all of a sudden his 2 toes are growing together it's infected and swollen it's bleeding a little bit.. It looks like it's starting to fall off.. (his 2 toes and the top of his foot) I have NO money for a vet visit.. Wut is this and what can I do?? I'm heart broken over this and do not what to end up losing my beardie... Please help!! If u could email me at candyla8@aol.com. I come on thru my phone I don't know if I'll be able to find this site again.. Please and thank u..

    • anaamhussain profile image

      anaamhussain 6 years ago

      Beautiful animals these lizards are. I have always wanted one as a pet but my parents say they will throw me out of the house. I am sure they would not but I am not all that eager to test it :D great work loved your lens :)

    • profile image

      pawpaw911 6 years ago

      Useful lens. Thanks.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Nice Squidoo. I really enjoy reading what you wrote about. Chris

    • Ben Reed profile image

      Ben Reed 6 years ago

      A great lens. Very informative.

    • Draconius LM profile image
      Author

      Draconius LM 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Parazap is used for most kinds of reptiles

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Do you think that that parazap stuff would work for leopard geckos?

    • wilddove6 profile image

      wilddove6 6 years ago

      Really informative and well-written lens!

      You know your stuff!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Bearded Dragon eggs are normally soft and leathery, if this is her first clutch and they are infertile it would not be anything to worry about

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      My female beardie just laid eggs today (unfertilized). Some of them were very small and others were large (16 total). The shells seemed extremely thin. Is this common or is it a sign that there may be something wrong?