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Catching and Taming Feral Cats and Kittens

Updated on November 17, 2014

Can Feral Kittens be Tamed?

Have you found a litter of feral, (also known as wild,) kittens and don't know what to do? I've been in your shoes before. My heart goes out to these precious creatures. Fortunately, feral kittens can be tamed and turned into wonderful house pets.It just takes time and a lot of patience.

One key is the age of the kitten. Younger kittens generally adapt easier than older kittens. However, this doesn't mean that you can't tame an older kitten. I have. In fact, over the course of three years my kids and I managed to capture all of the feral cats and kittens in our neighborhood.

Mind you, I had absolutely no experience with cats when we started this venture. I was always a dog person, so my knowledge of cats was limited. However, I learned just how special cats are and how dogs and cats can easily live together.

In this article, I will share with you all of the information I have learned about feral cats and kittens and how to tame them to either become a part of your family or be ready to be placed for adoption through a local rescue group. Please feel free to offer any tips or advice you may have!

This cute white kitten photo is by Rudolphfurtado at Wikimedia Commons.

Tips on Catching a Feral Kitten

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Most feral kittens are very fearful of people. As cute as they may appear, they will hiss, swat and exhibit very aggressive behavior unless the kittens are extremely young and the fear factor hasn't kicked in, yet.

In our case, we were lucky. A few of the kittens we caught settled in right away. However, when it came time to catching those that were about eight weeks old, the story was different.These were very aggressive kittens who would do anything to avoid capture.

Some of them, we quietly snuck up on and were able to catch. This was either by hand or by throwing a towel over a kitten and picking it up that way. We found that wet cat food with a strong odor of fish was a way to help get the kittens out of hiding.

We would put the food out, then wait for them to come to eat. Looking back, how we caught the neighborhood ferals was not necessarily the safest way to go about things as sadly, many feral cats and kittens carry diseases.

If I had to do it again, I probably would use a humane trap in which to catch them. To do this, bait the trap with wet food. Place a covering over the trap such as a dark colored sheet. Place the trap out in the evening and carefully monitor it. Have a cage ready complete with litter box, kitten food and fresh water, to transfer the kitten into once caught.

If you have other cats in the house, it is extremely important to keep the newly captured kittens away from them until they have been to a vet and have been tested for diseases such as HIV and feline Leukemia. I suggest finding a room that can be devoted to the kittens such as a bathroom or spare bedroom. You want to find a place where the kitten can roam freely, but without any hiding spots that you would be unable to get to the kitten.

Black kitten photo by phillwatson at morgueFile.

Kitten Formula

KMR® Powder for Kittens & Cats, 12oz
KMR® Powder for Kittens & Cats, 12oz

If the kitten you have is very small, you can bottle feed it using this formula. You just mix it with water.

 

Kitten Supplies for Sale

Here are some deals on eBay.

Tips on How to Socialize and Tame Feral Kittens

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Information on Taming Wild Kittens

Taming and socializing a feral kitten is not always an easy task. Simple sounds around the house such as a door closing or the turning on of a vacuum cleaner are enough to make a kitten bolt and hide. It's best to keep a new feral in a quiet environment, separated from the noises of the home, until the kitten begins to feel comfortable.

Unlike domestic kittens, feral kittens are not used to human touch. This has to take place slowly. Start by extending your hand, allowing the kitten to sniff you. The sense of smell is very important to wild cats. To get the kitten to come close to you, place some wet kitten food near you to entice the kitten towards you. This is one of the tactics we've used.

Depending on the individual kitten, we've also used another approach. If possible, we would just pick up the kitten, hold it close to us while petting it and talking to it. If you're uncomfortbale doing this, you can try to pick up the kitten with a towel and hold it next to you while petting it through the towel. Over time, the kitten will begin to get more and more responsive.

For younger kittens, one trick I came up with was to put the kitten down my shirt around the belly area. Be sure your shirt is tucked in and that the kitten can't climb out. I would then spend time petting the kitten through my shirt. The advantage of this is that the kitten is in a dark place, while against the warmth of a human body.

Just like people, each kitten will have their own personality and how well a kitten socializes will vary from kitten to kitten. Some will go on to attach themselves to all family members, while some will only connect with one. Remember to take things slowly. Some of the kittens our family has rescued have been available for adoption with a local rescue group within weeks; a few we had to hold onto for several months before they were ready to find their permanent homes.

Cute kittens photo by trooney at morgueFile.

Book on Feral Cats

Feral cat help and information.

Book on Feral Cats

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Why you Should Spay or Neuter a Feral Cat

Spaying Feral Cats

You may be one of those kindhearted people who will put out food and fresh water for any feral cats that may be on your property. Personally, I think it's wonderful because many ferals lead difficult lives. However, there is something that many people don't think of that can greatly help these cats. That is to get them spayed and neutered.

You may be wondering why you should put out money to do this, considering they're not really even your cats. The answer is to keep them from breeding. All too often female ferals have litters of kittens that will end up being homeless. While some of these kittens will survive, others will die at an early age due to a variety of reasons such as predators, weather or poison.

If cost is a factor, check to see if there are any feral programs in your area. If not, there's a good chance you can find some type of low cost spay and neutering clinic.

If you're wondering how to catch them, check to see if you can borrow a humane carrier from a local clinic. Should you see this as an ongoing effort, you might want to invest in a carrier to keep. The idea of all of this is to trap the cat, have it fixed and then return it outdoors to continue to live its life, without the worry of having litter after litter of kittens.

Kitty photo by jewels at morgueFile.

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Cute Kitten Pictures

I admit it. I love looking at pictures of kittens. I thought these were cute and wanted to share them. Hope you like them, too!This adorable kitten photo is by rhinosboi at morgueFile.

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Cutest Kitten Picture

How can you resist this face? I just want to cuddle this kitten.Sleeping kitten photo by alvimann at morgueFile.

Kitten Sleeping Picture - Cute Baby Cat

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When I saw this picture, I cracked up. I'm also familiar with the bottle in the photo used for bottle feeding kittens.Cute kitten photo by sonsuz at morgueFile.

What Do Feral Cats Eat?

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Feeding Feral Kittens and Cats

Feral cats can be quite the scavengers. They are not above going into a dumpster to look for food. They will also eat small animals such as mice, moles and birds. Lizards are also on their food list.

I remember one summer when there were several feral cats in the neighborhood. Although there are normally lots of lizards on my property during the summer, when the ferals were here, I never saw a single one.

If planning to put out food for some cats, first be sure that there are only adult cats and not kittens as well. The reason for this is that kittens are best off with kitten food versus cat food. If you think you have a combination of both, I recommend Felidae. This dry food is good for both kittens and cats and is considered to be a natural, holistic pet food. In addition, be sure to put out some fresh water particularly during the warmer months.

Should you be feeding any feral cats or kittens, not only are you helping to keep them healthy, you're also helping them to stay away from dangerous substances.

One day when I was driving my kids to school, I saw what appeared to be a dead kitten at the side of the road.When I checked, I found it was still breathing. I quickly scooped it up and brought it to the vet. Sadly, it was too late. According to the vet, the kitten had gotten into some kind of poison, most likely because it was hungry and looking for something to eat.

If you have some ferals around your property and you're concerned about what they eat, there's a good chance that one way or another they will find something to eat. However, to ensure that they get the proper food, you can always put out fresh food and water for them.

Feral kitten photo by Alvimann at morgueFile.

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Dangerous Foods for Cats

There are certain foods toxic to cats. You may be a good Samaritan who puts out food for the local feral cats, but caution needs be taken if you plan on giving them a treat. The ASPCA has a list of food that can be unhealthy and potentially harmful to felines.

If you are planning to give table scraps, such as cooked chicken or fish, be sure that no garlic or onions were used in the preparation process. Caution needs be taken with both raw meat and undercooked meat as they could contain harmful bacteria.

Time and time again we see images of cats drinking milk. Although you may be tempted to place a bowl of milk outside for any feral cats in the area, many cats are lactose intolerant and drinking milk can not only cause diarrhea, but other digestive problems as well.

Some people wonder if it's okay to give alcohol to a cat. The absolute answer is no. Alcohol can cause a variety of problems including vomiting, diarrhea, nervous system problems and in some cases, even death.

If wanting to give treats to any feral cats in your area, take care that you are feeding them healthy food, not food that can be dangerous for them. If needing to know more, contact your local ASPCA for further information.

Tiny kitten photo by Alvimann at morgueFile.

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Funny Cat Picture

I just love his facial expression.Funny kitten photo by imagefactory at morgueFile.

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Tired Kitten

Isn't this one precious?Tired kitten photo by alvimann at morgueFile.

Taming Feral Kittens

Would you try to tame a feral kitten?

See results

Funny Cats Video

Feral Cats as Pets

This is one of our success stories. We caught her at about 2-3 weeks of age. She was still quite wobbly when she walked. We named her Puss n Boots as she so reminded us of the character from Shrek due to her personality. She is now almost twelve years old and has been a wonderful family cat.

We just recently caught two feral kittens in our garage. They were so frightened. In less than a week they have become tame and love to sleep on my daughter's bed. We are currently looking for a home for them.

Update: They have found homes.

Feral cat pet photo by WriterJanis.

Good Kitten Books

These are on eBay. Often there are good deals here. Just be sure to check back if you put in a bid.

Thank you for stopping by! Feel free to share your feral story.

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    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 2 years ago

      I had never heard of catching and taming wild cats. Interesting idea.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @RinchenChodron: Oh I would be so scared if one of my cats disappeared like that. So good that he found you.

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      RinchenChodron 3 years ago

      I now keep a cat I found when he was 18 months old. He has his own lenses. The one thing I do deal with is that he is very difficult to keep indoors and sometimes disappears for up to 7 days and I worry that a cayote will find him. But he is SO affectionate, best cat I've ever had, and I've had a lot of them.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @Arachnea: That is so kind of her to do.

    • Arachnea profile image

      Tanya Jones 3 years ago from Texas USA

      I have an acquaintance who is forever finding feral cats and other strays. She's really good about finding homes for them.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @shpuggy: That's so good to hear about.

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      shpuggy 3 years ago

      I caught a tabby kitten on a farm I was working on several years ago. Tried to rescue a kitten that I suspect that was a sibling, but was very sick, didn't last half a day. The tabby ended up being called Weasel and after a good deal of work, he's my cheeky little baby. Likes to meow at my door early in the morning every morning.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @Snowsprite: I really like that idea. So many of them can be tamed and made into great pets.

    • Snowsprite profile image

      Fay 3 years ago from Cornwall, UK

      I love cats. We have a charity here that catches ferel cats and kittens and neuters them and tries to home them

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @sierradawn lm: That is wonderful that these cats are so well being taken care of. I wish more cities would do this.

    • sierradawn lm profile image

      sierradawn lm 3 years ago

      I have always been hopelessly addicted to cats since a very little girl. There is a wilderness park next to where I live now. The city releases feral cats there after neutering and vaccinating them. Kitty shelters have been built for them in the park. Many people from the community regularly provide dry cat food and water for our feral cat park population. We have over 20 cats there now. I loved and appreciated your lens!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @asilonline lm: Thank you so much!

    • asilonline lm profile image

      asilonline lm 3 years ago

      Great lens! Great info!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @CampingmanNW: I'm so glad you had such a positive experience with your feral. It sounds like you took very good care of her. If you have a 19 year old, then you are doing something really right. I hope you have your baby for much more time.

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 3 years ago

      Many years ago now, we adopted a feral cat. (or maybe it was the other way around) but in the beginning, she was (as you so eloquently write in your lens) afraid of anyone and everything or sound. She came around in the dead of winter with nearly a foot of snow outside. (she had to have been about a year old at the time) I built her a small enclosed shelter with a rear entrance to shelter it from the wind. It was raised off the patio deck, lined with blankets and warmed by a small 40 Watt lamp from my shop with a metal cage around the bulb. Within a day or so, she adopted that as a home and I suppose it was my smell all over everything that eventually brought her to allow me to touch her. To make a long story short, over a period of the winter and spring, she came to know and accept all of the family, living to a ripe old age of 16. I currently am on my last pet (19 year old grey cat) and it has been an excellent journey. Thanks for a really well written lens that is much deserving of the Purple Star award

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @rhondalynnjohnson: That's wonderful that you are helping those cats. Best of luck. More people like you are needed.

    • rhondalynnjohnson profile image

      rhondalynnjohnson 3 years ago

      I've tamed some feral cats before & am in the process of taming 3 right now. Winter is right around the corner & I really want them in a no-kill shelter before it gets too cold. It's taken me 6 weeks in the past. I've had these for about 2 weeks now. It takes a lot of patience. Great Lens, I love all the cute kitty pics.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @CaztyBon: That's so nice that you feed them.

    • CaztyBon profile image

      CaztyBon 3 years ago

      We have feral cats that we feed because of them we don't have a rat problem like they do a few streets away from us. I also had a feral kitten I took in and raised Frisky was 13 when she died. I really enjoy reading about kittens and cats. I liked what you did by taking in the feral kittens and giving them a chance had a good home.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Are you putting a smelly wet food in the trap? That has helped me.

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      I have caught and tamed a feral Manx kitten. I have had her for 2 months now. I am trying to trap the mother but she is too clever. I even got a trap from pest control. Shes a b&w Manx.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Snakesmum: We actually used to have a rescue feral named Magic.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Snakesmum: We actually used to have a rescue feral named Magic.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Snakesmum: We actually used to have a rescue feral named Magic.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Snakesmum: We actually used to have a rescue feral named Magic.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Snakesmum: We actually used to have a rescue feral named Magic.

    • Snakesmum profile image

      Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Your cat Puss n Boots looks a lot like my current cat, Magic. We got her from a shelter, so don't know her history. I'm all for neutering both feral and pet cats

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @lesliesinclair: That's great to hear that you don't have any in the area that you live. Sadly, there are so many in other areas that never get a real chance in life.

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      Helpful information for anyone aware of this problem. In my part of the city I've never seen any cat on the sidewalk or street. However, when we lived in a rural area everyone had barn cats.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @TolovajWordsmith: How cool that one is a mascot.

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 4 years ago from Ljubljana

      There are many feral cats around but they are pretty tame. One became sort of mascot in pizzeria. It seems everybody loves this cat, including the local dogs.I like the trick with dark and warm place. It works with screaming kids too;)

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @gadgetking1: That is so awesome of you!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Socialpro54 LM: Thank you!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @junkcat: Yes, they can. You just have to be patient.

    • gadgetking1 profile image

      gadgetking1 4 years ago

      Nice lens. We have 3 rescue cats-two are feral cats :)

    • Socialpro54 LM profile image

      Socialpro54 LM 4 years ago

      nice lens...

    • junkcat profile image

      junkcat 4 years ago

      I didn't know that feral cats could be tamed

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @LaptopLeader: Thank you for your thoughts!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @FrancesWrites: She is actually much prettier in person.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @renewedfaith2day: Sometimes, ferals will only attached themselves to one person.

    • LaptopLeader profile image

      LaptopLeader 4 years ago

      Wow. Amazing lens! I've never heard of people catching and taming feral cats before. Very interesting, and thanks for sharing!

    • FrancesWrites profile image

      FrancesWrites 4 years ago

      I am glad you mentioned that ordinary milk can make cats and kittens sick. Not enough people realise this. Puss in Boots is gorgeous!

    • FrancesWrites profile image

      FrancesWrites 4 years ago

      I am glad you mentioned that ordinary milk can make cats and kittens sick. Not enough people realise this. Puss in Boots is gorgeous!

    • renewedfaith2day profile image

      renewedfaith2day 4 years ago

      This is very hard to do. I had one that I raised from a kitten but I couldn't get it to where it wouldn't like anyone but me. Your tips are most helpful as I can tell you've had experience with this.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @WriterJanis2: Hey Janis, I'm in desperate need to find a home for a cat &kitties that my ex neighbor left behind in his back yard. There are new people living in that house and they can't keep them because they are allergic to cats like I am. I'm feeling them but they need a home. I'm worried that summer is coming and they don't need to live outside....please help me!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hey, I have a few kittens...they are different colors. I live in FL not sure where you live?

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I know. I've felt that way before. However, feral kittens and cats have a much smaller survival rate than domestic cats, so try to see it as you're saving lives.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @WriterJanis2: We haven't found them yet, but I can't get it out of my head how upset the mother might be if she just comes back one day and discovers her kittens missing. I know giving the kittens homes would be for the best, but I just keep thinking about how sad it might make the mother cat!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I would wait until they are a few weeks old or at least until they are capable of walking around. You will have to work with weaning them, which means you may need to bottle feed until they are on solid food. Good luck! I hope you are able to get them and eventually find them new homes.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      We have a feral cat that lives in our garage that we feed a few times a week. She is not friendly and won't come near us, and we think she's been living out there for a few years. Today my neighbor told us she thinks the cat has kittens, and has seen the mother moving them in and out of the garage. We searched all through the garage and my yard today and didn't see any kittens, but we're going to keep a look out. Once we find them, should we leave them with the mother until they're too old to nurse? We want to get them homes before they turn wild (we already have 7 indoor cats so unfortunately we can't keep them). Any tips you have for me would be appreciated!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @David Stone1: Thank you very much Dave!

    • David Stone1 profile image

      David Stone 4 years ago from New York City

      Just came back to this a second time. Enjoyable and great information on feral cats. Blessings!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Sharon Weaver: Bummer!

    • Sharon Weaver profile image

      Sharon Weaver 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      I love cats and have had them in the past but my husband is very allergic so no kitties for us.

    • Sharon Weaver profile image

      Sharon Weaver 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      I love cats and have had them in the past but my husband is very allergic so no kitties for us.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @PinkstonePictures: I feel lucky we could help them.

    • PinkstonePictures profile image

      PinkstonePictures 4 years ago from Miami Beach, FL

      Lovely stories, you have a talent to keep these little kitties safe and re-homed :-) They are lucky to have you

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Glad you are taking care of them.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Half of my cats are feral cats. Out of those 5 only 2 are still untrained. They live on our upstairs terrace but refuse to come in the house and they won't let us touch them (they were vaccinated and spayed though)

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I hope you get one. There are so many available through rescue groups.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @InfoCoop: Yes, it does take a lot of work. However, it is so worth it.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I REALLY want a cat! Great info!:-)

    • InfoCoop profile image

      InfoCoop 4 years ago

      Great lens! It takes a lot of work to raise a feral or even stray kitten. It's like having a newborn baby all over again but it is very rewarding.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @anonymous: That's so kind of you to feed all of them.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Last spring, two young kittens began hanging around my house, so I began to feed them. Buddy was the male and Sissy was a female. Sissy got run over on a road nearby leaving poor Buddy without his companion. Bud is not a pretty cat, but he is very charming. I feed him twice a day, have a heater on the porch for him in cold weather and we love each other very much. He is so affectionate, I can hardly believe it. In time, other cats have begun to come around looking for a meal and I feed all of them, but Buddy Boy is my baby now.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @takkhisa: Thank you for the blessing. I so love animals.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Lady Lorelei: The sad part is that many of them die.

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 4 years ago

      I am here to see these beautiful kittens and my family members love animal, we don't hurt them at all. Blessed :)

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 4 years ago

      I am here to see these beautiful kittens and my family memebers love animal, we don't hurt them at all. Blessed :)

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 4 years ago from Canada

      I applaud each person who takes the time to love and care for an animal who has no home. Many cats that are tossed out don't do well out on their own.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @MissKeenReviewer: Nice that you dropped by.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @gaga6599: Nice to hear.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Suunnyy: Glad you like the photos.

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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @getmoreinfo: You're welcome.

    • MissKeenReviewer profile image

      MissKeenReviewer 4 years ago

      This is a great lens-this will really help a lot of people and a lot of cats for that matter. Hope you can also drop by and read my lens- which I shared some of my moments with feral furry friends I now called family. Kudos to this and more power to you.

    • gaga6599 profile image

      gaga6599 4 years ago

      I learned something I did not know and enjoyed the pictures.

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      Suunnyy 4 years ago

      Great lens. I love cats and hese pictures are sooo cutee:)

    • writerkath profile image

      writerkath 4 years ago

      Hi Janis! Just had to come back and Squid Bless this lens since earning my wings! :) Hugs to you!

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      getmoreinfo 4 years ago

      Thanks for the tips on Taming Feral Cats and Kittens

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @kabbalah lm: I love dogs, too, but I became hooked on cats when we first caught a litter of feral kittens.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Felicitas: How wonderful that you volunteered.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @kabbalah lm: I also love dogs, but our kitties mean so much to us.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @WriterJanis2: hello .. they are so cute ..i really like them very much :)

    • Felicitas profile image

      Felicitas 4 years ago

      What a beautiful lens. I volunteered at an animal shelter a few years ago and I donate to a number of animal charities. I've never had any experience with feral cats though. It really touches me and makes me feel so good to know that there are people like you looking out for these wonderful little cats and kittens.

    • kabbalah lm profile image

      kabbalah lm 4 years ago

      Cute guys but I'm more of a dog prson

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @Just4Luck: Cute.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @softclaws: Thank you!

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @sukkran trichy: Glad you think so.

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      Justin 4 years ago from Slovenija

      Purrrfect!

    • softclaws profile image

      softclaws 4 years ago

      @softclaws: come by to https://hubpages.com/animals/cats-soft-claws if you have time, its about cats as well, but I've got to say you've done this lense up quite nicely - Here's a thumbs up (like) your way! :D

    • softclaws profile image

      softclaws 4 years ago

      Meow! I approve of this lense :) really nice read, just passing some thanks and appreciation your way, great lense about feral furry buddies :) so cute

    • sukkran trichy profile image

      sukkran trichy 4 years ago from Trichy/Tamil Nadu

      cute cats and kittens.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @tedwritesstuff24: LOL

    • tedwritesstuff24 profile image

      TedWritesStuff 4 years ago

      What a lot of good information.. and that's from a 'dog' person.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @VspaBotanicals: I'm happy you let me know that.

    • VspaBotanicals profile image

      VspaBotanicals 4 years ago

      Absolutely adorable.

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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @LindaFoster LM: Thank you for the good wishes with feral cats. They really mean a lot to me.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @LindaFoster LM: Thank you very much Linda!

    • LindaFoster LM profile image

      LindaFoster LM 4 years ago

      What a wonderful lens, enjoyed reading it and looking at the cute kitty pictures. I wish you lots of luck the feral cats are so lucky to have people like you caring for them. Thanks for sharing :)

    • WriterJanis2 profile image
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      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      @CoolKarma: Actually thank you for taking the time to have the interest in this resource.