ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Pets and Animals»
  • Animal Care & Safety

Haliburton Forest Wolf Centre

Updated on October 10, 2014

Watch Wolves Living in the Wild; See Wolves Eat Beavers

The Haliburton Forest Wolf Centre lies within the Central Ontario Haliburton Highlands. The Centre features a captive pack of Grey Wolves (Canis Lupus) and, at the time of my visit in May 2009, had four male and two female wolves. This lens will introduce you to the wolves and explain some of their eating habits.

The Haliburton Forest is located on Redken Road and can be reached via Highways 118, 35, and 121. On Hwy 118, at West Guilford, turn north and cross the bridge to take County Road 7 for approximately 20 kilometres and follow the large red signs to the Base Camp, the entrance point into Haliburton Forest. Their phone number is (705) 754-9653.

Smudge, the 10 year old alpha male.
Smudge, the 10 year old alpha male.

Smudge, the 10 year old alpha male, watches the pack.

In July 1996 the 15 acre Wolf Centre was opened to the public. One-way glass windows in the interpretive facility allow close study of the wolf pack without causing any harmful interference. A few trees and foliage have been cleared away from the window area to provide a clear sunny area to view the wolves. This lens is dedicated to the Haliburton Pack that I observed:

Smudge

Grisham

Ginger

Granite

Cedar

Halda

Four healthy wolf pups were born at the Wolf Centre on April 27, 2011. They have been named: Luna, Lonestar, Logan and Layla. It was the first wolf pups born in three years. At the end of April 2012 six additional pups were born. Two of the pups were donated to the Wolf Science Centre of the University of Vienna, Austria.

For a sad up-date, Grisham passed away in October 2012.

Ginger, the alpha female, enjoys the sun.

Haida is the youngest male in the wolf pack. - The yellow eyes in his black face are hypnotizing.

Grisham is one of the most beautiful wolves in the pack.

Click thumbnail to view full-size

The open sunny area around the interpretive facility is ideal for resting.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Feeding time nears.
Feeding time nears.

As feeding time approaches, the pack becomes energized.

Warning: The pictures that follow are graphic.

The Wolf Centre feeds the wolves every seven to ten days. The feedings are on a random basis to prevent the wolves from getting domesticated. Food can include road kill or animals, such as beavers, brought to the interpretive facility. The food is frozen and thawed the morning of feeding day. We were extremely lucky to be at the Wolf Centre when all six wolves were in the cleared area, and during feeding time.

The following photographs show the wolves feeding on four large beavers. The beavers are anchored to the ground with wires to prevent the wolves from taking the food into the woods.

It's feeding time. - A yummy beaver.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
All six wolves go after the same beaver.The wolves remove the intestines and set them aside for later.  The intestines of the beaver are full of wood which the wolves cannot digest.The wolves will bite into the intestines and vigorously shake them to remove the wood chips before eating the intestine walls which contain vital nutrients.
All six wolves go after the same beaver.
All six wolves go after the same beaver.
The wolves remove the intestines and set them aside for later.  The intestines of the beaver are full of wood which the wolves cannot digest.
The wolves remove the intestines and set them aside for later. The intestines of the beaver are full of wood which the wolves cannot digest.
The wolves will bite into the intestines and vigorously shake them to remove the wood chips before eating the intestine walls which contain vital nutrients.
The wolves will bite into the intestines and vigorously shake them to remove the wood chips before eating the intestine walls which contain vital nutrients.

Tragedy Occurs On January 1, 2013

Unfortunately, on New Years Eve, vandals cut an opening in the fence that surrounds the 15 square kilometre wolf centre. Four wolves escaped. Either Haida, the alpha male, or his son Logan was found dead from gun shots. Later, Haida's mate, Granite, was found severely wounded from gunshots and was tended to by the local vet. Staff were still trying to reunite the other two wolves with the rest of the pack.

Wolf Pack: Tracking Wolves in the Wild (Discovery!) (Discovery! (Paperback))
Wolf Pack: Tracking Wolves in the Wild (Discovery!) (Discovery! (Paperback))

Describes the social interaction of wolves in a pack as they share the work of hunting, maintaining territory, and raising young.

 

Visitor's Comments - Please let me know what you like about this lens.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      nifwlseirff 4 years ago

      Fantastic photos! I love all of the wolves, but I'd have to say Haida has the most amazing colours. Gorgeous!

    • profile image

      JoshK47 5 years ago

      How interesting! Thanks for sharing!