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I Love Birds Of Prey! - Pictures Of Birds

Updated on November 26, 2014
Me holding a kestrel
Me holding a kestrel | Source

Me And My Bird

Here's me holding one bird of prey, a Kestrel (it's a type of Falcon, if you don't know).

Well, it's not really mine but this was me on holiday a couple of years ago when we visited a place called Clovelly, in North Devon and had a "Bird of Prey Experience".

You may have noticed that it's the same photo I use on my profile.

As you may have guessed, I've always had a thing about birds of prey, so I thought I'd write a lens about them and include some birds of prey pictures along the way.

Now I'm no expert.

I'm really more the couch potato type, who would rather watch wildlife on TV than 'get out there' and see it first hand (shame on me).

However, whenever I have had the opportunity to see these birds, they amaze me.

I'll try to put in some proper facts about them, but if there are any real experts out there, then please feel free to correct me in the comments!

All photos mine, unless stated otherwise (Creative Commons non-commercial share-alike international license 4.0).

Falconry: The Essential Guide
Falconry: The Essential Guide

A hardcover book for falconry beginners as well as those already 'into' it.

 
Kestrel up close
Kestrel up close | Source

Kestrel

A Type Of Falcon

Let's have a closer look at this little one then.

This bird is a Kestrel, which is actually a kind of Falcon.

However, unlike the Peregrin, it hovers above the land waiting to drop on small prey, such as mice and voles.

He is incredibly light; just a few grams.

So light in fact, that when I was holding him, most of the weight was from the glove: I hardly felt his presence at all and had to keep checking he was still there!

This is the one you may have seen by the side of the motorway flapping its wings madly, but staying absolutely still.

The amazing thing is, that if it does move (say it's being blown about by the wind) then its body moves, but its head stays where it is.

While I was holding him, the lady showed us how this works by getting his attention and then getting me to move him up, down and around: all the while he kept his head still focussed on her, while his body and neck move to keep it that way.

He has a load more vertebrae in his neck to enable him to do that.

Bushnell Falcon 133410 Binoculars with Case (Black, 7x35 mm)
Bushnell Falcon 133410 Binoculars with Case (Black, 7x35 mm)

and if you want to see birds of prey up close, you may need these binoculars

...or you could just visit my garden, but please ask first!

 
Male Barn Owl
Male Barn Owl | Source

Owls

The common or garden Barn Owl

This is a Barn Owl.

Quite common in the UK; beautiful, perhaps a bit thick (IMO), but certainly lovable.

They are amazing and SILENT hunters (hmm, I'm shouting to let you know that they are quiet...?)

We saw this one as part of the same "bird of prey experience" at Clovelly.

The thing I found out was how tiny their heads are!

Sure they look massive, but most of that is just feathers.

Our guide got us to gently put a finger in through those feathers until we could feel its skull.

I'm not kidding that my forefinger went into the feathers right up to the middle knuckle.

So, tiny skull; massive eyes; feathers that make it ABSOLUTELY SILENT (see, I did it again).

Someone can correct me on this, but I believe that the rounder face indicates that this one is a male; whereas the female has the classic "heart" shape most people will associate with Barn Owls.

Me and my other bird
Me and my other bird | Source

Owls Part 2

After the day at Clovelly, I was all made up for that holiday.

So just imagine my surprise when just a couple of days after, we went to Tamar Otter and Owl centre and I got picked to hold this one!

The sad thing is that I can't even remember what type of owl he was (shame on me again!).

I have a feeling that he is an Eagle Owl, although it's possible that he may be a Long Eared Owl: perhaps someone can confirm/deny in the comments?

This one is much bigger and heavier than the others but still feeds mainly on small mammals.

**Update**

Thanks to @peterduck I now believe that this is the Eurasian (or European) Eagle Owl.

Please see the comments for details!

**Further Update - Breaking News**

Thanks to Tali (the owner of the beautiful Kestrel above), I can now confirm that this owl is in fact a Bengal Eagle Owl, not the European. - See her comment below!

Peregrine Falcon Tethered
Peregrine Falcon Tethered | Source

Peregrine Falcons

My favourite!

Sadly, I haven't got a picture of me holding a Peregrine Falcon, as I have never done that (to the right is a picture of a peregrine falcon by Carl Mueller).

However, I wanted to put a special section in here because these are my absolute favourite bird of prey.

This is a bird that can see for miles (literally) and approaches the speed of sound when it drops out of the sky to catch its prey.

...and drop they do!

I once saw a falconry display where they showed off a Peregrine.

It flew up and up and up ...until it couldn't be seen at all: not even a dot in the sky.

The man then did his thing with a small bit of bait on a lead.

He moved it round and round like a lasso, called to the bird and it dropped like a stone from that height to catch it in mid air! Amazing!

Falconry & Hawking
Falconry & Hawking

Well received book for falconry enthusiasts, written from a UK viewpoint.

As one of the reviews points out about some other books, trapping a bird for falconry is illegal in the UK.

 

Did You Know?

Some interesting facts about birds of prey that you may not have known!

Here's some interesting little facts you may, or may not know about birds of prey:

  • They are called birds of prey, not "birds of pray"

- It's an easy mistake to make and an easy typo to type.

These birds eat small "prey" animals such as mice, voles and even other birds.

  • The phrase "Fed Up" comes from falconry.

Birds of prey have a hunting weight, which is where they are 'lean' and hungry.

However, if you give them a good meal then they are "Fed Up" as their tummies are full and they lose interest in taking part in your silly falconry display!

  • The "Stoop" is the term for the point when a bird of prey drops out of the sky to catch its prey.

If you want to find out more about birds of prey from real experts then a very good place to go is the RSPB (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds) - see the links at the bottom of this article.

I Saw A Kestrel!

I was driving up the A3 as usual last week when I spotted a kestrel.

It was just going from flying into the transition to the hovering position.

Great to see!

Falconry Manual
Falconry Manual

General guide to falconry with variety of birds described.

 
"Faucon Hobereau" by Polo7
"Faucon Hobereau" by Polo7 | Source

My Family: Hobby In The Garden!

I got home last night to be greeted by excitement from my wife and kids:

They had seen a Hobby in the back garden (example pictured right)!

Now, if you knew our house you might be amazed, because our back garden is tiny: there are only a few feet between the window at the back of the house, and the fence.

It was great to have this opportunity to see a bird like this up close, particularly when we checked and realised that it only comes to the UK in the Summer - so it was early too.

My only regret is that I wasn't home from work earlier to see it myself!

See also Hobby (bird) on Wikipedia and the RSPB Hobby page (see link to RSPB website below) for more info.

Photo: "Faucon Hobereau" by Polo7

Want To Know More?

Here are some other sites you may find interesting.

A markerhawk conservancy trust, andover -
Hawk Conservancy Trust, Sarson Lane, Amport, Andover, Hants SP11 8DY, UK
get directions

Do you like birds of prey?

Do you hate them?

Do you agree with me that Falcons are awesome?

Do you have any corrections for my lens?

Leave a comment to let me know!

© 2012 Tim Bader

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    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 2 years ago from Surrey, UK

      Excellent!

      I've seen these birds warn crows off (or the other way around), but I haven't seen them ward off humans before.

      Thanks for reading.

    • Paula Atwell profile image

      Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

      Every year my parents have a nesting pair of hawks that lives in a tree in their front yard. While they are nesting, if we get too near, one of them flies by and warns us off. It is really cool to observe.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @AcornOakForest: Yes, I never get bored learning about nature, or anything else for that matter!

      Kids are great fun to be around, particularly in that kind of environment.

      Thanks for reading.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Lorelei Cohen: Thank you for your kind and profound words!

      Perhaps you should write an article on the subject? - I'd love to read your thoughts.

      Thanks for dropping by.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Lorelei Cohen: That's a very good point, Lorelei. I've seen crows fend off other larger birds plenty of times, as well as going after them. Last weekend, we went to a bird of prey centre. One of the displays included 2 white headed eagles which they had 'let go' out to a distance of about 2 miles and then called them back. On their way back, a crow started bothering one of them and kept it up for quite a while until the eagle went up out of reach. Could well have been that it saw the eagle as a threat to its chicks, but it's amazing that the eagle was at least twice its size.

    • AcornOakForest profile image

      Monica Lobenstein 3 years ago from Western Wisconsin

      Birds of prey are fascinating. I have the good fortune to work with kids where I get to provide lots of outdoor learning opportunities and we've seen some great presentations on birds of prey. I love learning about them too!

    • Lorelei Cohen profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 3 years ago from Canada

      @delia-delia: Owls and other larger birds actually prey on crows so that situation may not have been quite what it seemed. Crows are black in color as a defense so they will look like a shadow when they are nesting or perched in a tree.

    • Lorelei Cohen profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 3 years ago from Canada

      There are so very many wonderful creatures which share this planet with us. I wish everyone could show the admiration and tolerance toward them as you do to the birds of prey. What an amazing world that would be.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @delia-delia: Those crows sure are persistent, aren't they?

      Sounds like you have plenty of drama around you!

      Thanks for reading.

    • delia-delia profile image

      Delia 3 years ago

      Great lens! I Love Birds of Prey! We have quite a few...the other day a huge Owl was trying to protect it's baby that flew out of the nest and the Crows were trying to attack it. We have Red Tailed Hawks, Eagles and a small hawk, don't know what kind...love to watch them.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Jim Houston: Thanks for reading, Jim.

      I've not seen American Kites before -just looked them up, and can see that the "Swallow-tailed Kite" is the one you get in your area. They look lovely.

      We have the Red Kite here in the UK, which you can guess is a reddy-brown colour, but no less magnificent than their cousins!

    • profile image

      tonyleather 3 years ago

      We sometimes get the rare privilege of having a Sparrowhawk come and roost temporarily in our young oak tree at the bottom of the garden. He is a magnificent sight, as indeed are all such birds. Great lens!

    • Jim Houston profile image

      Jim Houston 3 years ago from Wilmer, Alabama

      Really neat lens Tim. We live in the country and have lots of hawks, owls etc. We recently had a beautiful white and grey Kite working the field near our house. They are really cool to watch. We live on the Alabama / Mississippi line and they are seen quite often around here. JimHouston33

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @tonyleather: Thanks!

      We get a Sparrowhawk come to visit, but to have one roost nearby must be wonderful.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Klaartje Loose: They certainly are!

      Thanks for leaving a comment.

    • Klaartje Loose profile image

      Klaartje Loose 3 years ago

      I love birds of prey and have seen a lot of them in nature.

      They are so majestic!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @DawnRae64: Thanks for dropping by (twice) and taking the time to comment!

      Want to know a secret?

      I'm not educated enough either - but I'm learning.

    • DawnRae64 profile image

      Dawn 3 years ago from Maryland, USA

      Love this lens! I've looked twice (can't comment when I look from work though). thank you for sharing this. I love watching Osprey, Eagles, owls, and Hawks. Although, I'm not educated enough know the different Hawks, and wouldn't know it if i'm seeing kestrels, falcons, etc. Thank you for sharing.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @BenjaminFrancs: I was able to hold the birds because we paid for a special "bird of prey experience".

      Covelly is not really a park, but a small town/village - a real place where real people live and tourists wander round!

      Thanks for reading.

    • profile image

      BenjaminFrancs 3 years ago

      ThanksTim this article was great. I love birds! I've never been to a park like this. Why were you able to hold the birds? Thanks for the advice about topics and have a wonderful day.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 3 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @golfspice: Glad you liked it.

      Yes, we like watching out for Red Kites now wherever we go!

      Thanks for reading.

    • profile image

      golfspice 3 years ago

      Enjoyable page. All wildlife is impressive in its own way. The Red Kite has been reintroduced into areas of the UK in recent years with great success, and is amazing to see in its natural habitat.

    • Tim Bader profile image
      Author

      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @anonymous: Hello Tali,

      Thanks so much for dropping by - I'm glad you liked it!

      Thanks also for the tip about the Bengal Eagle Owl: I will make a correction.

      BTW: I have been meaning to put a link on here so people can find you easily, so you prompted me to finally do so!

      Thanks again for reading,

      Tim

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      GuitarNY 4 years ago

      Very interesting!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hey there! So glad that meeting my birds left such an impression. Actually the owl you are holding at the Otter Park is a Bengal Eagle Owl not European - Europeans are much bigger and in fact the biggest in the world. Love the blog. Tali from Clovelly

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @jericho911 lm: Parrots are ok - I like the variety of colours.

      To each his own though!

      Thanks for visiting.

    • jericho911 lm profile image

      jericho911 lm 4 years ago

      Very cool lens ! I'm more into parrots, but birds of prey are very interesting and amazing to see in action.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @rob-hemphill: I agree.

      Efficient and deadly, but strangely beautiful!

    • rob-hemphill profile image

      Rob Hemphill 4 years ago from Ireland

      We've been regularly visited by a Sparrowhawk recently who fortunately seems more intent at hunting for worms in the fields than on little birds. They are dreadful killing machines, but that's nature!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @webscribbler: What a fascinating story/experience you had.

      I'm glad you didn't run him over!

      Thanks for sharing that with us.

    • profile image

      webscribbler 4 years ago

      I'm fascinated by birds of prey. I just wish they wouldn't do their hunting in our back yard. lol

      The most exciting thing that happened to me was when I saved an owl. We were on one of those two-lane, back country roads. I spotted something in the middle of the road. It just didn't seem like the typical roadkill or other garbage. It was pitch black dark. I slowed down and stopped. It turned out to be a young owl sitting on the middle of the road. He wasn't afraid of me. Wouldn't get out of the road - little idiot. lol

      I was a little afraid of him (didn't want to risk picking him up) and was gently pushing him with my foot to get him to move off of the road. Lo and behold, he had a tiny mouse that he wouldn't leave.

      By now we had started backing up traffic behind our car. Mom's yelling that I'm going to get run over and to leave it. Fortunately, no one came from the other direction.

      No matter what I did, the bird wouldn't move. I figured the other people were thinking I was kicking the poor thing. Finally, people got out of one of the other cars. They had a vet in the family and had encountered owls before. They said it was a very young one and not acting right. (Gee, letting me push it with my foot might have been a clue?) They threw a jacket over it and took it to the vet.

      It was an interesting experience for sure. We never heard from the other people. Hopefully, the little guy was OK.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @jayavi: Just to be clear, it's not 'mine', although I wish it was!

      Thanks for reading.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @anonymous: Thanks @Tipi and thanks for the share :)

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Fiorenza: @peterduck thanks for dropping by and thanks very much for the info.

      I'm pretty sure that you're right about it being the Eurasian/European Eagle Owl - definitely rings a bell with me (though I'm no expert either).

    • jayavi profile image

      jayavi 4 years ago

      You are so lucky to have a falcon. Thanks for sharing.

      .....\

      ...../\

      )==)=O>

      .....\/

      ...../

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      An amazing hobby you have with birds of prey. Thank you for sharing this, I will share you lens on Facebook. Awesome! :)

    • Fiorenza profile image

      Fiorenza 4 years ago from UK

      Have always loved birds of prey. I once had a barn owl perched on my hand at a falconry centre - fantastic experience. I'm pretty sure that your owl in part 2 is an Eurasian Eagle Owl, otherwise known as the European Eagle Owl, though I'm not an expert.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @ismeedee: Thank you and thanks for visiting.

    • ismeedee profile image

      ismeedee 4 years ago

      We need them and they are very, very beautiful! Wonderful photos!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @miaponzo: Thanks for leaving a comment.

      What bids of prey are common in Kuwait?

    • profile image

      miaponzo 4 years ago

      I love them, and they are absolutely beautiful! Loads of people are into these birds here in Kuwait where I live. :)

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Aunt-Mollie: Thanks!

      It's great to involve the kids too. They adore wildlife so it's fantastic when they can see animals really close.

      Thank you for reading.

    • profile image

      Aunt-Mollie 4 years ago

      I've always been fascinated with birds of prey, especially falcons because they have been trained by man for thousands of years. I love the picture of you with the owl! What a wonderful family hobby you have.

    • Aibrean82 profile image

      Aibrean82 4 years ago

      I love birds of prey too, and the Peregrine Falcon is also my favourite. I would love to hold one sometime!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @KathyMcGraw2: That must have been a strange/amazing experience!

      Thanks for sharing it.

    • KathyMcGraw2 profile image

      Kathy McGraw 4 years ago from California

      What a great experience to be able to hold and examine a live bird, especially one of the Birds of Prey species. I have seen many in the wild, and held a live barn owl that I thought was dead. It was found in the road, but turned out to only be stunned and played dead until we were no longer near it. Then it flew away.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @sheilamarie78: I like all kinds of birds too.

      To me though, there's nothing quite so majestic as birds of prey ...even though the little birds have to watch out when they are around!

      Thanks for visiting!

    • sheilamarie78 profile image

      sheilamarie78 4 years ago

      I love birds of all kinds. It's great to have an experience up close as you did!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @funpics: Thanks for visiting.

      I've not heard of the Brahminy Kite before: where is that from?

    • profile image

      funpics 4 years ago

      Birds of prey are majestic. My favorite is the Brahminy Kite.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @goldenrulecomics: Thanks! Glad you liked them.

    • goldenrulecomics profile image

      goldenrulecomics 4 years ago

      nice photos!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @FashionMommy: It was pretty cool holding them. I'm looking out for another opportunity now.

      Thanks for dropping by - glad you enjoyed it!

    • profile image

      FashionMommy 4 years ago

      Awesome lens! Birds of prey are so majestic, and how neat that you got to hold some.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Loretta L: Thanks for the positive comments!

      Not sure if I've seen a Marsh Harrier or not, but I often see kestrels flying by the roadside.

    • Loretta L profile image

      Loretta Livingstone 4 years ago from Chilterns, UK.

      This is a fab lens. I love the red kites we have in our area, but I would very much like to see a Peregrine falcon. I've seen a Marsh Harrier and Kestrels, and once a beautiful Barn owl. There are so many more I want to see.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @ItayaLightbourne: Thank you!

      Blessings to you also :)

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 4 years ago from Topeka, KS

      Ohhhh I love birds of prey! Always have. So awesome that you got to hold a few. Blessings. :)

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @darciefrench lm: Thanks! :)

    • darciefrench lm profile image

      darciefrench lm 4 years ago

      Nice to meet you and your birds :D

    • captainj88 profile image

      Leah J. Hileman 4 years ago from East Berlin, PA, USA

      Falconry is fascinating. I've only ever seen falconers in movies. These birds are so graceful and keen. Nice lens. I like the Peregrine best, I think.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @mstcourtjester: Why, thank you very much for your encouragement!

    • profile image

      mstcourtjester 4 years ago

      Interesting lens, good work.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great lens! We have a crowned eagle family in the neighbourhood, beautiful to watch them soar!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @MarilynThompson: Wow, that's amazing! I'd love to see them.

    • MarilynThompson profile image

      Marilyn Thompson 4 years ago from Washington State

      We have nesting Bald Eagles throughout Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and pictures taken from our front yard of two in the evergreen trees nearby. What a wonderous sight for living in a very populated area.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Bexley: Yes, he is a cute little guy and the feathers are just so unbelievably soft!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @PromptWriter: 1 1/2 hours?! Amazing

      I've only managed a few minutes with a sparrowhawk in our back garden...

      I'm jealous now!

      Thanks for leaving a comment.

    • PromptWriter profile image

      Moe Wood 4 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      I think all birds of prey are beautiful and they serve a purpose. I especially like to look at owls though. I had my first close up experience with a red-tailed hawk this fall when one caught a squirrel in my back yard. He was there for 1 1/2 hours so it was an interesting experience in wild life.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @DebMartin: It sounds like a lovely place to be.

      Thanks for leaving a comment.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @anonymous: I remember seeing some red-tail hawks at a show when I visited the States a few years ago.

      If I remember correctly, red-tailed hawks are the only bird of prey that hunt in a "pack"?

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @Sue-DN: Wow! It's times like that that are truly amazing.

      Thanks for leaving a comment!

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @greenspirit: I like Harris Hawks too, although I think I've only seen one or two of them.

      I never saw a buzzard until a couple of years ago and since then I have seen several: one of which surprised us by circling over our house (which is in a fairly built up area).

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @LizMac60: Yes, awesome is the word I would use too!

    • Earnlat profile image

      Earnlat 4 years ago

      I really like the "birds of prey". My favorite are falcons, eagles, frigates, osprey!

    • Bexley profile image

      Bexley 4 years ago

      I love owls...especially the eyes. The barn owl in your photograph is beautiful!

    • profile image

      DebMartin 4 years ago

      I love to watch them soar high and such eyes they have. We have 5 bald eagles and 1 golden eagle nesting on the lake my camp in Northern Ontario is located. But admittedly, these guys are as much scavengers as birds of prey. They're always hanging out waiting for me to dump the fish bucket. I love to listen to the owls around my home in Michigan but I get a little angry when they hang out in the trees above the bird feeder.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      You're a creature of my own heart. I love birds of prey. Red-tail hawks in particular.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Kestrels are my favourites too and Peregrine Falcons they fly at a tremendous speed.

    • profile image

      Sue-DN 4 years ago

      Nice lens. Personally I like owls. Last summer, on an early Sunday morning walk, I watched a white owl flying around a field looking for some breakfast. It knew I was there but didn't seem to mind at all, flying pretty close at times. Magical!

    • SecondSally profile image

      SecondSally 4 years ago

      I think owls are beautiful. I've heard them many times at night, but I've only seen a couple of them in the wild.

    • greenspirit profile image

      poppy mercer 4 years ago from London

      I love them! Like you I got close up to them at falconry centres and displays, but I'd watched the Buzzards high up in the Quantocks most of my life. My FAVOURITE birds are the Harris Hawks...real characters; very knowing, clever and funny, and sheer power and agility in the air as well.

    • LizMac60 profile image

      Liz Mackay 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Birds of prey are awesome, as our American cousins say.

    • seashell2 profile image

      seashell2 4 years ago

      Birds of prey are so cool to watch. Saw a show featuring some of them at the zoo not far from here this past summer.

    • OhMe profile image

      Nancy Tate Hellams 4 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      There is usually an exhibit of Birds of Prey at our annual Fall Harvest Festival and they are always so fascinating.

    • Tim Bader profile image
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      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @nifwlseirff: Thanks for your comments!

      I saw your lens on the Tasmanian wedge tailed eagles: it must have been awesome to see them up close in the wild like that!

    • Tim Bader profile image
      Author

      Tim Bader 4 years ago from Surrey, UK

      @SusanDeppner: They certainly are!

      Thank you for your comment.

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 4 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Birds of prey are fascinating!

    • naturegirl7s profile image

      Yvonne L. B. 4 years ago from Covington, LA

      I am interested in all birds and especially owls. Welcome to Squidoo.

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      nifwlseirff 4 years ago

      I adore birds of prey, although I've never held one (yet). I always visit the aviaries in zoos. I don't think I could choose a favourite - I love owls just as much as eagles, and the smaller hunting birds. I did manage to get a couple of great photos of some owls in captivity, but my favourite photos is of the endangered Tasmanian wedge tailed eagles in their nest (http://www.squidoo.com/wedge-tailed-eagles), which I captured while on holiday.