ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Pit Bulls - The Most Loyal Loving Dog You'll Ever Own!

Updated on February 27, 2014

Truth About Pit Bulls

Pit Bulls are one of the most loving, attention seeking, happy breed of dog in the world today. There are several myths concerning Pit Bulls. Hopefully those can be cleared up today.

Myth 1: Locking Jaws

One of the biggest fears people have developed about Pit Bulls is their bite. They infact do not have locking jaws. Their size and strength is the cause for this mistake. Since most men cannot physically unlock a Pit Bulls jaw it is assumed they have lock jaw. When in fact they can be opened with the right amount of force or distraction.

Myth 2: Most Aggressive Breed

American Pit Bulls are constantly being displayed as one of the most aggressive breeds. According to a behavioral Test (atts.org/breed-statistics/) the American Pit Bull passed with a 84.3 percent. That is 2.7% higher than the average for all breeds. From my own experience of having multiple types of dogs throughout my life Pit Bulls are the nicest breeds I've owned. Their temperament can be hyper at times but never aggressive.

Myth 3: Pit Bulls Will Turn Without Notice

This is not only a myth for Pit bulls but for all dogs. There are always warning signs a dog will turn aggressive. The fact is that people do not recognize the signs and then continue to aggravate the dog. One statement repeatedly used "I'm an animal person, all animals love me." is not correct. All animals, including Pit Bulls, have a different personality. No two are the same. A real animal lover understand this and takes precautions whenever encountering a new dog, no matter the breed. There are several physical traits to look for.

1. Face - eyes, mouth

2. Ears

3. Tail

4. Hair

5. Overall Body Posture

For more information on recognizing a dogs emotional state please visit www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/canine-body-language

Pit Bull History and Hero's

Pit Bulls were once known as "nursemaid's dogs" because they are very reliable and protective of children. Not only are they great with kids but also during times of war and crises.

1. Cheyenne, Dakota, and Tahoe

Three Pit Bulls from Sacramento, CA that worked as search and rescue during 9/11 at the World Trade Center.

2. Stubby

A decorated WWI Pit bull honored at the White House for his service. He listened for on coming artillery rounds, found wounded soldiers in need of help, and warned soldiers of gas attacks.

My own experience with Pit Bulls has been nothing but loving. I currently own 2 from different litters and mothers. They are 1 year apart in age and get along terrific. They love everyone who walks through my door and want to play with every dog they see. If you need more proof of how much love these dogs give please take a look at the many photos below.

Diesel & Bailey

Diesel and myself
Diesel and myself
Diesel
Diesel
My son Diesel
My son Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Bailey
Bailey
Diesel as a puppy.
Diesel as a puppy.
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel, a Pit Bull doing what he does best.
Diesel, a Pit Bull doing what he does best.
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey
Diesel and Bailey

© 2014 Nicole Stump

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Nicole Stump profile imageAUTHOR

      Nicole Stump 

      4 years ago from Nashville, TN

      I agree with your comment, but in fact there are two different type of "Pit Bull" Terrier's.

      American Staffordshire Terrier and American Pit Bull Terrier. The term pit bull is not really the problem in my eyes. It's the people that associate the negative with the term that are the problem.

      Thank you for your comment! :)

    • mkott profile image

      Michele 

      4 years ago from Reno, Nevada

      Thanks for sharing this.

      My thing is since there is such negativity associated with 'pit bull' type dogs why do owners still use the term "Pit Bull". There is no breed called "Pit Bull" so why use it? I tell owners to use the term - Staffordshire Terrier mix (example) but I do believe there is a time to use the term 'pit bull'. For example your Hub.

      In some areas when it comes to categorizing dogs that are at the Humane Society or your local shelter, they will label anywhere from 4 to 6 breeds as "pit bulls". I have seen a Bull Dog and Boxer listed as a pit bull type dog.

      It is unfortunate there are those that use to good traits of this type of dog for bad things. They are super loyal and will do anything to please their owner, even fight. Most will stop fighting, unless they are continuously prodded and commanded to fight.

      Breeds that are classified as "pit bulls": Staffordshire Terrier, American Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Bull Terrier and sometimes: Dogo Argentino, American Bulldog, English Bulldog just to name a few. I know with American Bull Terrier many breeders and owners take the "Pit" out of their breed name.

      The pit bull type dog no matter what breed is a wonderful family dog. There are those that should not have dogs because their intentions are not good. All animals deserve to have loving and responsible owners.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)