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Bearded Dragons What You Need To Know

Updated on May 18, 2012

Bearded Dragons

Did you know that a Care Sheet on Bearded Dragons is not enough to really help you answer your day to day questions? That many many times online answers are wrong or based on opinion? Over 14 years, we have heard from people who wanted a resource that can help as questions came up and from a qualified source. That is why we developed this Lens. We hope you will find the information useful. We will continue to add new questions as they come up.

Here are some of the most popularly asked questions and links for further info.

Fire Color Morph
Fire Color Morph

Bearded Dragons - The Top 15 Questions Answered!

1. Q: Does parazap kill intestinal parasites?

A: The active ingredient in parazap is cloves. Cloves is a natural appetite stimulant so some dragons may respond by showing an increase in food interest. However, there is no evidence to prove that closes or parazap can kill intestinal parasites.

2. Q: What is the best thermometer for a bearded dragon set up?

A: The most accurate thermometer is a digital infra-red temp gun. We prefer Pro Exotics brand. It runs $30 Get your readings by holding the gun about 10" away from the top of the basking spot and also get a reading on floor on the cool side. These readings will let you know if your set up has the 20 degree temperature gradient bearded dragons need to thermoregulate. This is needed to allow the cold blooded reptile to adjust its body termperature.

3. Q: All of my crickets died and stank. What did I do wrong?

A: Keep crickets in a large, CLEAR storage tub using NO LID. Wal-Mart sells huge Sterlite tubs that work great. It needs to be tall and much larger than you would think. When the crickets arrive, open the box, flip it over and shake so crickets fall into the bin with the egg carton, too. Because the bin is clear, the crickets will run to darkness in between the egg crate flats rather than crawling up the sides and out. The open top allows proper airflow so the crickets do not die off and smell. Change the gut load daily.

4. Q: What is the best substrate?

A: We use paper towels on babies which is very easy to clean and prevents babies from swallowing sand with crickets. We have used Repti-Sand in Desert White on adults with no impaction problems when tested over a 4 year period. We do notice that dragons will eat the red or blue sand so that is avoided. Also, any other types of sand or walnut shells will likely cause impaction so avoid these as well. As far as reptile carpet, crickets tend to chew on carpet which then gets ingested when the dragon eats the crickets. All in all, our favorite substrates are paper towels for babies and Repti-sand in white for adults.

5. Q: Does my dragon need a heat lamp at night?

A: Bearded Dragons need a nighttime drop in temperature. But if the room where you keep your dragon falls below 67 at night, it makes sense to run a red lamp to bring the temp up to 70 or 72 Fahrenheit.

6. Q: How much of my dragon's diet should be veggies and how much should be bugs?

A : We feed babies at a ratio of 90% crickets/phoenix worms/baby silkworms and 10% leafy greens. Once the dragon reaches 16" in total length, we gradually start adding shredded squash, thin fresh greens beans and other foods. There is a Food Chart on our site at http://www.fireandicedragons.com/food_chart/food_c... which indicates what kinds of foods to feed a subadult or adult dragon and how often. Bearded dragons have a daily dietary requirement of 2:1 calcium to phosphorus. Keep the calcium to phosphorus ratio in mind when selecting foods for your dragon.

7. Q: I read a lot of conflicting information. What substrate do you use?

A: To maintain the highest level of hygiene, we use paper towels. When a dragon reaches subadult or adult size we have successfully used Zoo Med's Repti-Sand in White only. We only recommend White since we have witnessed babies eating blue and red sand which can cause impaction and death. We have tested Repti-Sand in White for several years and never had an impaction problem in our subadults or adults. If you use this sand on babies, it would be safe to place the sand only on the cool side. That way, you have less chance of a baby bearded dragon ingesting the sand with its greens and bugs which are fed on the basking or hot side. Note: Beware of sound alike names for sand. Many can be deadly.

8. Q: I got a few babies back in September and had them together while I was setting up cages. One of the babies nipped the other and now the one is missing a foot. Any advice?

A: I'm sorry to hear that. I am sure you feel terrible. We keep babies separated from the time they are about 2-3 weeks of age. Even as well fed as the babies are here, aggression can happen fast. We have heard of a customer who put her young dragons together and in less than a minute, one attacked and killed the other. If you get in the habit of keeping young dragons separated, you can avoid this in the future.

9. Q: What is a good incubator for a hobby breeder?

A: The Hovabator by Georgia Quail Farm is a nice hobby level hatcher.

10. Q: My dragon is sitting on his basking rock with his mouth open. Should I be worried?

A: Gaping is the term for what you describe. Gaping is part of the thermoregulation process and very normal. The dragon is expressing excess heat through his mouth.

11. Q: Instead of buying the 20 gallon long tank for my new baby can't I just put my new baby in a 55 gallon tank?

A: There are several reasons why a 20 gallon long tank is recommended for a baby dragon. One is the UVB factor. Babies grow very fast and need the UVB all day. Placing a branch in the tank doesn't do it since the baby dragon doesn't know he needs UVB or for how long. The UVB needs to be placed so that, no matter where the baby is in the cage, that UVB is within theraputic range. 55 gallon tanks are too tall. Another reason for the 20 gallon long tank is to allow the baby to locate prey. Crickets will automatically run to the dark side of the tank to get away from the light on the basking bulb. Yet where do dragons spend much of their time? Under the basking light. in a large tank, the baby doesn't see the prey. We have found that a 20 gallon long tank is just the right size for the baby to eat well and maintain a healthy growth rate.

12. Q: How do you keep crickets alive? Mine died and they stunk.

A: We use a very large CLEAR plastic tub from Wal-Mart. No Lid. When crickets arrive, open the box, flip it over and dump the whole thing into the bin, egg crate and all. The crickets will run in between the egg crate rather than up the sides of the bin to get away from the light. If you use an opague bin, crickets feel safe and run up the sides and out. If the clear bin is large enough, even with no lid there should be no escapees. If you must use a lid, use a screen. You want air to circulate. Otherwise, humidity builds up in the cricket bin causing odor and die off.

13. Q: My color morph bearded dragon s dark and looks like a normal dragon. Why?

A: If your dragon has belly marks, striations or patterns on his or her belly, the dragon is stressed. Stressed out dragons turn gray. Take the set up back to square one. Look at temperatures ( how accurate your thermometer is will make a huge difference). How far off the floor is your tank? What can the dragon see? What kind of basking bulb are you using? Do you have a decorative background? There are many factors that can make a bearded dragon unhappy. It is our job as keepers to make the changes. Happy color morph beardies are bright. Unhappy dragons are gray. The good news is that I have seen a dragon turn bright as the sun instantly by changing the one thing that is making the dragon unhappy.

14. Q: My room gets cold at night. Should I give my Bearded Dragon a heat lamp?

A: Beardies need a nighttime temperature drop. If your room temperature falls below 68 degrees though, a red bulb that brings the nighttime cage temp back up to 70 is a good idea.

15. Q: Can I feed my baby Beardie too much?

A: We do not withhold food for our babies. They need a lot of protein to handle that fast rate of growth. We feed babies and subadults up to one year as much as they want twice a day. Just remember to allow 2 hours after "dinner" for the dragon to digest his food under the basking lamp before lights out.

For information on brumation, pre-treatment medication cycles and other issues see the newsletters on the Resources section at http://www.fireandicedragons.com/contact.cfm

For basic juvenile care see the Care Sheet at http://www.fireandicedragons.com/care_sheet.cfm

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Juvenile Bearded Dragon Care

Tips

Please remember that your juvenile bearded dragon is a baby and will be afraid in his or her new environment. Make sure the dragon's cage is in a stress-free area, rather than in the kitchen or another high traffic area.

Don't play with, or pick up, your new dragon until he or she has completed adjusted, is eating and belly marks are gone. Then handle juvies just a few minutes at a time working up to longer periods.

White copy paper placed on the outside of a glass tank will block his strange view of the world. This will help a lot as he is already dealing with the stress of the move and seeing his reflection in a glass tank (we do not use glass tanks here). After the dragon is eating well (20-40 bugs per day or more) remove one sheet of paper per week.

We feed crickets using long-handled tweezers (purchased at Wal-Mart.) The juvies are conditioned to recognize the tweezers as a signal for "mealtime." We throw 3 crickets in at a time, leave and recheck in a minute or two. We again feed however many crickets as have been eaten and remove any "hoppers." We do this until the dragon is full and remove any excess crickets. This keeps the dragon's environment clean. Phoenix Worms can be placed in a shallow dish.

Too many crickets in the cage at one time will freak them out and the dragon will often refuse to eat.

If the crickets are too big or too small, some will not eat and worse, the dragon can starve to death or become paralyzed (in the case of a cricket that is too large).

Phoenix Worms do not need to be dusted as the worms are naturally high in calcium and low in phosphorus.

One thing we especially like about Phoenix worms is that we can plump the worms in a water glass a few minutes before feeding. This helps to provide additional fluids for those dragons who do not drink much.

If the dragon does not eat the first day, mist in the evening and try again the next morning. The most important thing is to keep the dragon hydrated.

Dark markings or striations on a dragon's belly are a clear signal that the dragon is stressed. When color morphs are stressed, they can also go dark, losing their bright color temporarily. Check temps on the basking spot. Is it 100-105 degrees? Check out the cool side. Is the temperature there at 80 degrees or below? If the temps seem right, look for other causes and make adjustments. When the dragon's belly has returned to its normal white color and is free of markings your habitat has the correct temps and the dragon is adjusting to its new environment.

Make sure your dragon's enclosure is at least 4' off of the ground. Near ground temps can be 20 degrees cooler, though the temp gun may read 100 - 105 degrees.

Bearded Dragon Care Sheet

Juvenile Care Sheet

ABOUT BEARDED DRAGONS

Bearded Dragons are one of the most intelligent of all reptiles. Beardies have individual personalities and are capable of learning to a very high degree. But beardies also have one characteristic that has helped to make dragons the most popular reptile for 10 years running: they are said to bond with humans at the level of a dog or cat. True? Yes, but this characteristic is most apparent when the dragon reaches subadult or adult age and is no longer in pure survival mode, i.e., running away from everything at warp speed. Once a bearded dragon reaches the subadult to adult age, they are less afraid of being eaten by predators and will generally calm down. We have adult dragons that love to hang out with us while we watch TV or will sit on our shoulders while we enjoy the summer sun on the patio. Some appreciate praise, respond to their names, like their heads scratched, etc. They are all individuals but all of our beardies respond to gentle human interaction.

More Than One?

Juvenile bearded dragons can be quite territorial and sit on a fellow cage mate preventing him or her from eating or drinking. If more than one beardie has found its way to your heart or home, keep the dragons in separate cages where they cannot see each other especially during the dragons' adjustment period.

As adults, this social hierarchy presents few problems and we house adult females together often. This is one way to observe the behavior of Arm Waving, an endearing characteristic.

HEALTH CHECKS

One of the most useful purchases you can make is a gram scale. Keeping weight and feeding records will alert you when something isn't quite right. This enables you to correct the issue before it becomes life-threatening. Good husbandry and frequent informal exams will keep your dragon happy and healthy for many years.

Before brumation which occurs typically during the dragon's second year, it is advisable to have a qualified reptile vet check a stool sample. Fecal checks can alert you to any parasites before the dragon goes to "sleep" and is most vulnerable to parasitic attacks. Just as you worm a puppy, you will probably need to worm your dragon at some point in his life.

HOUSING

A 20 gallon long aquarium is usually adequate to house a 6" juvie for a few months. This size is long enough to allow proper temperature gradient but small enough for the juvie to locate prey items.

As your dragon grows, it will require a larger enclosure. We use white cages with clear sliding doors vented in the back as shown in our Gallery section. These cages are easy to clean, keep valuable UVB and bright, visual light inside the cage rather than spreading it through the glass walls of an aquarium.

The cages are also able to withstand the high temperatures of the basking light without melting the structure. You can order similar cages by asking for the Fire and Ice Dragons set up at http://www.customcages.com/. We have tested many enclosures over 8 years. In the cages mentioned here, the dragons ate the best, looked the best and bred the best.

These cages are 48" x 24" x 24" high or 18" high. This size is large enough to allow for single dragons or up to 3 adults. The front is sliding glass doors. Vents are located in the back. The cages stack.

The only other items you will need to purchase are the appropriate substrate (we ONLY use paper towels or Repti-Sand in White since Repti-Sand has never caused impaction problems for us in 8 years), digital probe thermometers or an infrared temp gun) and a clear household light bulb to use for the basking light.

Substrate

We use Repti-Sand from Zoo Med as the substrate for juveniles or paper towels. Repti-Sand is super fine and doesn't need to be pre-sifted. Other sands and substrates have created well-documented impaction problems. Therefore we use paper towels or Repti-Sand exclusively. For our older dragons, we only use paper towels.

Spot clean feces immediately and disinfect the cage thoroughly once a week. Cleanliness now will save you many headaches in the future. We use 1 part bleach to 30 parts water to clean. Rinse well and dry.

Cage Furniture

Juveniles benefit from a simple environment. A smooth, pal sized river rock available at most nurseries makes an excellent basking rock. We use dark rocks which hold heat well and aid digestion. You can also allow the dragon to bask on the round reptile thermometer and scoot the dragon off to read the temp.

DO NOT use heat rocks or heating pads which burn a dragon's sensitive belly. The only items in our juvie bins are thermometers, a feeding dish and a shallow water dish. That's it.

UVB Lighting

Your dragon will need full spectrum UVB light. We use Zoo Med's 10.0 UVB Reptile light and a fluorescent type fixture that runs the length of the cage. This UVB bulb performed the best in our tests against all other UVB lights.

UVB only penetrates 8-12" from the source. Make sure the UVB light is about 10" from the floor of the dragon's cage.

If the UVB light is older than 3 months or is too high from the floor of the cage, the dragon will not be stimulated to eat and MBD (Metabolic Bone Disease) can cripple the dragon.

We check our UVB lights every six weeks with a Solarmeter 6.2. When UVB levels drop to 70% of burn-in levels, the bulbs are no longer in the therapeutic range and need to be replaced.

Thermometers & Basking Lamps

The basking or heat fixture we prefer is the silver domed variety, also known as a clamp light. For the actual heat bulb, we use a standard clear household lamp bulb, like Sylvania. You will want to buy several wattages and switch the light bulbs out while testing for the correct basking temperature and as the seasons change.

For juvies, the dragons generally eat best at 100 - 105 degrees using a digital infra-red temp gun (www.tempguns.com). This temp gun is completely accurate. We have seen other thermometers be off by as much as 15 degrees!

Do not use screen tops for aquariums as we have found the tops block up to 30% of UVB rays. We either hang the lamp from a positive above the bin or clamp the light on the side. If you are clamping the light on the side of an aquarium, you should try the smaller clamp lights available to Lowe's or Home Depot that are 7" across to narrow the heat beam.

The cool end of the cage needs to be at 80 degrees (taking your reading on the floor of the tank).

If the temperatures are not correct, raise or lower the lamp or the wattage of the bulb you are using in the basking lamp until the temperature under the light on the bottom of the cage is correct. Temperature mistakes can be fatal. Temperature problems cause 90% of dragon husbandry problems and are directly associated with lack of appetite. Bright light and correct temperatures stimulate dragons to eat.

For convenience, set lights on an auto timer for 12 hours/day. A nighttime drop in temp to a normal household temperature of 70 degrees is necessary.

Dragons wake up and bask to warm up. Light, heat and UVB stimulate a dragon's appetite and allow the dragon to digest his food.

If the basking spot is too hot or too cool, the dragons will not eat.

On the other hand, when a dragon's internal temperature becomes too hot, the dragon requires an area of the cage that is 20 degrees cooler to get away from the heat of the basking lamp and thermoregulate. Thermoregulation is required for a bearded dragon to survive. If the dragon cannot cool off, the dragon will die.

FEEDING

We feed hatchlings 3 times per day. We have tested both traditional and pellet diets and currently feed a mixed protein diet of crickets, small silkworms, Phoenix Worms and fresh, high calcium greens.

Crickets

Juveniles should be given as many crickets as the dragon will consume in 30 minutes. Feed juveniles 2- 3 times a day with appropriately sized crickets, no larger than the width of the dragon's mouth. Place 1 or 2 crickets in the cage at a time until the dragon is full.

Crickets should be dusted with supplements that support the fast growing bones of bearded dragons. Our choice is Repti-Calcium with vitamin D-3. We dust crickets 1 x per day for juvies. A vitamin supplement - Herptivite - is given 1 x week.

Crickets also need to be gut-loaded with other things to make them more nutritious. Products like Gut Load are fine. You can also use high calcium foods like the heavy leaves and stalks from mustard and collard greens, some kale, a potato and chopped fresh green beans. Veggies supply both food and moisture to the crickets.

Remove crickets within 1 hour of feeding. Remember to remove crickets at night. Crickets will bite hatchlings while they sleep.

Phoenix Worms

This worm is relatively new to the insect feeder market. So far, we are extremely pleased. The dragons eat the worms eagerly. The worms are naturally high in calcium and low in phosphorus and therefore, do not need to be dusted. The worms can also be plumped before feeding (see Tips) to add additional moisture. The worms also do not need to be gutloaded and keep for weeks at room temperature.

Phoenix Worms

The dragons eat the worms eagerly. The worms are naturally high in calcium and low in phosphorus and therefore, do not need to be dusted. The worms also do not need to be gutloaded and keep for weeks at room temp.

Greens

Each morning, place a shallow dish of torn salad greens that are high in calcium and provide moisture: mustard and watercress are excellent, as are turnip green, arugula, endive, escarole, collards, Romaine lettuce, kale, etc. can be given.

WATER

Provide a clean, shallow (knee deep or less) dish of water every morning. The bowl should be large enough for shoulders to enter into comfortably. Most dragons won't drink from bowls and need to be soaked and/or misted. Spraying babies head to tail 2 x a day for several minutes with a plant mister works best. Mist babies in the AM with hot tap water and in the PM with warm tap.

Ask Your Questions

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    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forI would take him to a reptile vet ASAP. Also check our website for how to set up the dragon. If dragons are set up wrong, they grey down.

      ----- Original Message -----

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have just bought a 2 year old citrus breaded dragon and it seems to not be eating and turning a bit gray what's happening to him ? Please help me only had him 2 days really worried feels like he has lost weight :(

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forKev,

      Likely your dragon has an intestinal parasite called coccidia. You will need to take him to a vet for a fecal float to obtain the proper meds. The cage should have just paper towel in the bottom. The rock and water dish and tank should be bleached with a ratio of 10% bleach to 30% water, left 10 minutes then rinsed with clear water very very well.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      hi ive just got a dragon and ive give it around 30 crickets over 2 days and today hes had a poo and mygod it stinks the house out can i use fairy liquid or stuff like that to clean his heat rock and climing tree? just to get rid of the smell thanks.ps im new to this :(

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forLauren,

      II am so sorry to hear about your dragon. It is unlikely he died for sorry. It is more likely the dragons had parasites and/or adenovirus.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      i had two bearded dragons for the past 7 years. One died this morning. will the other one die because its mourning its tank mate?

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forSeparate the dragons first. I would use Triple Antibiotic ointment every day on the injured tail. Make sure the dragon is only on paper towel substrate so sand does not stick to the ointment. Good luck!

      ----- Original Message -----

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      my bearded dragon got its tail bitten of at the bottom by another dragon, what should i do?

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forI would get it to 100 (no higher) ASAP.

      ----- Original Message -----

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Is it alright if my baby beardy's basking spot is 90 degrees instead of 100 - 110? If not how long do I have to fix this?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      my beardie fell from the computer desk and started shaking i don't think he broke anything but is he ok...

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Squidoo Comment Notification forHow old is your bearded dragon? What size tank is it in?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      My bearded dragon is not laying under her heat lamp anymore

      Should I be worried????

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: He is not getting enough fluids through misting which should be twice a day early AM and late PM or his basking bub is too strong/ You should check out our Care Sheet at www.fireandicedragons.com. It is easy to read and will help save your baby's life. Good luck!

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Without a pic is is hard to know. However, I would say it is normal for dragons to change color somewhat as they age. The exception is our line of 100% Citrus yellows which stay bright all of their lives.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I've had my bearded dragon for about 5-6 years now and she is starting to turn greenish. Is this a problem or is it normal?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Our new baby bearded dragon spends all his time in his water bowl...he seems too cold, is this dangerous?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I just got my bearded dragon a girlfriend and this is the second day I have had her but I noticed they smell of an odor. Should I be worried?

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      paul-smith-3954546 5 years ago

      hi i was just checking what medication you use to clear a high yeast infection ?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      my bearded dragon is about 1month old and he opens his mouth and try's to bite me when i try to change his water and try to feed him and i'm scared hes gonna bite me please help

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: At 3 - 4" he should be a new hatchling right out of the egg. At least here he would be. Please do not feed him anything but 90% bugs and 5-10% greens for at least 6 months or he will not grow. Babies need protein! Ours at his age are eating 20+ correct size bugs per day. Get crickets from a farm like Premium Crickets to get the best price and the right size which should be 3/8". Pet store sizes are always wrong.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @fireandicedrago: He is only 3-4 inches right now, I am honestly guessing on the age from research I have done. The lady at Petsmart said he was 6 months old!!! I really really doubt it because he is just now learning how to jump and chase his bugs. the 3/8 crickets he leaves in the tank, but the pin heads he gulps up. I am feeding him 5-7 a day, the lady at pet store said only 2-3 a day but he was starving! I have now gotten him to start eating some red leafed lettuce and some papaya, but not much maybe one or two small bites..do you have any other reccomedations for me to try with him?

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I have no idea but if it stresses him out, remove them! : )

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes, the bearded dragons can be feisty when they are hungry! Are you feeding him enough? Our babies eat 30 - 50 bugs per day. Pin heads are too small. Our 6 - 8" babies eat 3/8" crickets and medium phoenix worms. Belly marks or going dark is a sign of stress. Change his cricket size to 3/8", feed more often, like 3 times a day and watch his temps so they are correct.

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Sometimes is takes a few days for the bearded dragons to settle in. Does he have belly marks? What is the temp on the basking spot? There are a lot of reasons for not eating. I would suggest you read our Care Sheet, especially the Tips section at http://www.fireandicedragons.com/care_sheet.cfm

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I would feed her only Phoenix Worms and greens for a few weeks. I have seen amazing recoveries when folks have used this trick but it is not guaranteed. Good luck!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      im looking after my auntie Bearded Dragon and had to move him from about 10 -14 miles away, ive only had him snice yesterday i woke up this morning and he wouldn't eat or drink, i know that her husband wasn't feeding him ( which was only for a day) but he also seems to be unhappy. i don't know what to do, and was hopeing you could help?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have had my 5 week old beardie for a little over a week now, but he is getting kind of skiddish until he eats he can be kind of feisty. He also will NOT eat his veggies, but eats his pin head crickets. I thought he was going into the first stages of molting because he was turning a grayish coloe... He is now will go from really dark, to gray, to green on his back on he sides of them? HELP Please!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Why is my dragon aggressive after I changed the cage by edding new rocks and tree

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes! Get an infra-red digital temp gun from www.lllreptiles.com for like 23. It will solve your problem!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      My beardy is about 6 months old now, and seems to have MBD, will she ever grow out of it? I have replaced uvb to a 10.0 and have been feeding her dusted crickets along with veggies high in calcium and she still seems to have trouble moving about. any help is much appreciated

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Swelling can be caused by too much vitamin A or D. You should check the Care Sheet at www.fireandicedragons.com for how often to give vitamins. Also it could be the opposite - too little. Since I have no way of know how often you feed him supplements, I would read the care sheet and resources section newsletters.

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Swelling can be caused by too much vitamin A or D. You should check the Care Sheet at www.fireandicedragons.com for how often to give vitamins. Also it could be the opposite - too little. Since I have no way of know how often you feed him supplements, I would read the care sheet and resources section newsletters.

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Definitely not! You can mist him and use cardboard egg carton in his cage as a basking rock. He will rub all over the wet cardboard of the egg carton and remove his shed. If he is eating and not pooping he has a blockage probably from eating substrate (we only use paper towels) or from eating bugs that are too big. Try bathing him in warm water scooting him to make his back legs move. I would do that for about 5 minutes in shoulder deep water. Hopefully, he will poop. Otherwise, a trip to the vet is called for.

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes. I would go to the Care Sheet at www.fireandicedragons.com. It has a lot of tips for just this thing. A lot depends on what kind of bulb you are using or what size tank, etc which is way too much for this post here. If you read the Care Sheet you can compare each section to what you are doing and make the adjustments. Good luck!

    • fireandicedrago profile image
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      fireandicedrago 5 years ago

      @anonymous: It could be that he is sick in which case he needs a vet. It could also be that he is in a cage too small or is not hot enough. Try going to our website and looking in the Resources section and the Food Chart at the top of the Care Sheet section at www.fireandicedragons.com. There is a lot of info in old newsletters about this kind of thing. Meanwhile, I would take him to a vet. Good luck!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Why has my dragon gone white. And not moving much he's 2 half years old

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      We got our bearded dragon yesterday (04/28) and we seem to be having a hard time getting a good temp reading for his cage, this makes me very uncomfortable because I can't tell if he is too cold or to hot, any idea how to fix this?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Should I help peel the shedding skin from my beardies tail? Also he is eating and not pooping, what should I do about that?

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have had my bearded dragon for almost two years and I did not get him until he was a fairly big size not tiny like I see at the pet stores. Last summer his front leg would swell up and he would limp once in a while now he has it in his back leg. Any ideas on what's causing this? This is my first bearded dragon and I hope I am not doing anything wrong. Reading all the info I think I am doing everything correctly. I would be devastated if something happened to him.Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

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      fireandicedrago 6 years ago

      @lauraashleystrickland: Laura, Your dragon seems to be doing what is called "gaping" which is how a bearded dragon releases excess heat, much like a dog panting. It is normal behavior. Eating too large a cricket is another issue. I would leave him alone while he attempts to digest his food. He is skittish to tell you he doesn't want to be held. I'm sure it is only temporary but I would listen to his instincts. If he has trouble pooping tomorrow, I would place him in some shoulder deep warm water with you there the whole time so he does not drown. The goal is to get him to exercise his back legs to help him poop. To do this, make sure his legs are resting on the bottom of the sink while you do this but that is almost floating. Then gentle push him with a finger so he kicks his back legs. I would do that about 5-6 times then let him rest and soak for 5 minutes. Then repeat the process. I would do that for 15 minutes keeping the water warm. If he does not poop by the next day, I would do that soaking and exercise once in the early AM before feeding and again 30 minutes before lights out. I would also give him 2 drops of mineral oil in the AM to help him pass the block. If, at any time, his back legs become paralyzed, I would take him to a vet right away. If he doesn't poop by Day 3, I would take him to a vet. Good luck!

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      lauraashleystrickland 6 years ago

      my baby bearded just ate a cricket a little bigger than he should have it was in with all the small and extra small. He struggled a little eating it. I couldn't get to him to help him. now after putting him back in his tank from the feeding tank he is on his basking log holding his mouth open for a bit then closing it. he is acting really skidish around me now. he has a uva and an uvb bulb it stays 100 - 104 in his basking area and 86 in the middle of the tank and 82is on the cool side. should I be worried about my lil guy? Could this be from the cricket? I mist the cage twice a day