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Search for the Crimson Rook

Updated on August 12, 2015
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What kind of bird did I see?

One day while in my backyard, I observed a rusty or roufous colored bird, it looked a lot like the size and shape of a crow, but the wrong color. I rushed inside to grab my camera. Upon returning, I had just enough time to watch this unknown bird fly away, displaying more rusty plumage.

I was intrigued. What kind of bird was that? Crows, rooks, ravens are almost entirely black. It was too large to be a cardinal, and the color was wrong, being neither brilliant red nor the muted browns that a female wears.

This bird to the left is about the closest in size and shape I could find, but completely the wrong color.

Unless otherwise noted, I took all the pictures on this page.

Duck Male
Duck Male

I decided to find my Red Rook

After unsuccessfully spotting my red rook for some weeks, I decided to bicycle to a nearby park and see if I could get a shot of him, plus take some interesting pictures, exercise, and enjoy the weather.

I first came across what I think is a Muscovy Duck.

He was waddling along with a friend, minding his own business.

Certainly not what I was looking for, so I continued to the park.

Osprey
Osprey

Near the entrance to the park...

I heard a screech sound and looked around.

I found the fellow to the right sitting near his nest, watching me intently. He looks like an osprey to me.

Too big, wrong color, and wrong kind. Osprey are birds of prey, with a sharp beak and talons.

I took a bit to do some geocaching

Geocaching is a kind of a treasure hunting game. People will hide waterproof boxes, mark down the GPS coordinates, and then post online where the geocaches are.

Geocachers will go to these coordinates and try to find the treasure, then return the container back for other to find.

Geocaching is a fun way to spend a day. Geocaches come in many shapes and sizes, and many different difficulties.

I didn't find the cache, but I did find this tortoise, resting in his home. I didn't want to bother him any further, so I left.

Okay, no Geocache, but I did find this cute cactus

Okay, no Geocache, but I did find this cute cactus
Okay, no Geocache, but I did find this cute cactus

There were tiny fiddler crabs along the bank

There were tiny fiddler crabs along the bank
There were tiny fiddler crabs along the bank

This colorful crab was nice enough to pose for me.

This colorful crab was nice enough to pose for me.
This colorful crab was nice enough to pose for me.
Wooden Tower
Wooden Tower

I came across a wooden tower

I've been to this park before, so I had a good idea of where I could find this tower.

I decided to climb to the top and take some landscape photos of the intercoastal waterways while I was there.

It is always a beautiful view from the top.

Picture Facing North West from the wooden tower

Picture Facing North West from the wooden tower
Picture Facing North West from the wooden tower

I continued on

I found evidence of a fire in the park. A few years ago, there was a fire that threatened my home here. Pasco County Fire came out and fought it for quite a while and saved all the homes, thankfully.

I hadn't realized that the fire had gotten this far.

You can see black charring near the base of the tree on the trunk, where it splintered and fell.

Another Tortoise

Another Tortoise
Another Tortoise

What caused this copse of trees to grow like this?

What caused this copse of trees to grow like this?
What caused this copse of trees to grow like this?

Thunder Rolls...

Being quite a few miles from home, and heard thunder.

In Florida, thunder means imminent rain, so I decided to leave. I was a good 20 minute bike ride from home, and couldn't chance ruining my phone, GPS receiver, nor camera (although I did end up getting sand in the barrel, seizing the camera barrel, ruining it)

It got progressively darker as I made my trek back, and raindrops were just starting to come down as I arrived home.

Hepatic Tanager
Hepatic Tanager

Still no luck, but...

The closest I could find online to the bird I saw is part of the "Tanager" group of birds, specifically the Hepatic Tanager.

It seems a bit small compared to my memory.

I am keeping a close eye out still, to attempt to spot my "crimson rook" again, and will make more trips to search it out.

Photo from: Snowmanradio

What do you think the bird I saw was?

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    • Grifts profile imageAUTHOR

      Devin Gustus 

      5 years ago

      @SteveKaye: I will have to work on that, and keep an eye out for him again. Thanks for stopping by!

    • profile image

      SteveKaye 

      5 years ago

      You asked a challenging question in your note: "What is this bird."

      I'd need more info to be of any help. Certainly a photo would be useful.

      Here's an idea that may lead to an answer: Contact the Audubon chapter in your area and ask to speak with a local bird expert. This person will know what birds might appear in your area. Then be prepared to tell: a) Where you saw the bird (in a tree, on the ground, on a shore), b) Your best description of the bird, including overall size, bill shape, body shape, color, tail length, plus anything else that you remember, and c) What was the bird doing (resting, eating, and so on)?

      I hope this helps.

      I'll add that identifying birds can be difficult, especially in early summer. Juveniles are fledging that look sort of like (maybe) the adults. They may have smaller bills, different feather colors, and different behaviors.

      Wish you the best.

    • profile image

      SteveKaye 

      5 years ago

      @NC Shepherd: Thank you so much for this referral. You are very kind to think of me.

    • adragast24 profile image

      adragast24 

      5 years ago

      Great story! Hope you will see your bird again!

    • Grifts profile imageAUTHOR

      Devin Gustus 

      5 years ago

      @Namsak: Thanks!

    • profile image

      Namsak 

      5 years ago

      @Grifts: Go to his profile page https://hubpages.com/@stevekaye There is a contact button under his photo.

    • profile image

      Echo Phoenix 

      5 years ago

      oops! I will have to come back tomorrow to SquidLike you as it seems I have reached my limit for the day :)

    • profile image

      Echo Phoenix 

      5 years ago

      Lovely! I would love to learn more about birds and bird watching.... hmmmmmm, just met an avid bird lover on the train recently and he had that certain twinkle in his eye ;)

    • Grifts profile imageAUTHOR

      Devin Gustus 

      5 years ago

      @NC Shepherd: How might I get in contact with Steve Kaye?

    • profile image

      NC Shepherd 

      5 years ago

      I was going to suggest asking Steve Kaye, also.

    • profile image

      Namsak 

      5 years ago

      I don't know - but Steve Kaye would.

    • razelle09 profile image

      razelle09 

      5 years ago

      not familiar with birds., however you've captured a nice one

    working

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