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The Fennec Fox

Updated on May 16, 2012

Have you ever heard of a Fennec Fox?

The Fennec Fox is a beautiful creature with some surprising qualities. Learn about its diet, behavior, habitat, and how it has adapted to life in the Sahara Desert. You will also see why conservation of the Fennec Fox and its habitat is so important.

Fennec Fox Photo Credit: National Geographic

The Fennec Fox, sometimes called the Desert Fox, is the smallest member of the fox family. It grows to about 1 1/2 feet high and weighs an average of 3 pounds. The Fennec Fox is dust colored, which helps it blend in with its natural habitat, the Sahara Desert. Probably the most recognizable feature of the Fennec Fox is its large ears, which grow to about 6 inches. The Fennec Fox also has thick fur on its feet to protect them from the hot desert sands.

Sahara Desert
Sahara Desert

Habitat of the Fennec Fox

The natural habitat of the Fennec Fox is the arid regions of North Africa and parts of the Arabian Peninsula. The Sahara Desert has the most concentrated populations of the Fennec Fox. The bottom of sandy mounds, hills, and dunes are favorite places for the fox to build their den because of moisture retention, and the sparse vegetation is used in the making of these dens. The Fennec Fox is exceptional at digging, and can burrow out a home for itself very quickly, which it shares with other pack members.

The Sahara Desert is the largest hot desert in the world, and one of the driest regions with the central part of the desert being the most arid . The Sahara is 3,600,000 square miles with some of the sand dunes rising as high as 590 feet, and harsh sand storms that whip through the region at high speeds. The driest regions of the Sahara averages less than an inch of rain per yer, which is why the Fennec Fox gets most of its water from vegetation.

The Fennec Fox is difficult to study in the wild because of these harsh conditions.

The Fennec Fox is an omnivore, meaning they eat both plants and animals. The diet of the Fennec Fox consists of desert creatures like insects, rodents, lizards and birds when available, plus their eggs. They eat the wild desert berries and grasses, which is where the Fennec Fox gets most of its water.

The Fennec Fox is also considered an exotic pet, and the diet of the Fennec Fox in captivity can be a bit challenging, since most people don't live in the desert. Some people have found that a mix of dog food, cat food, fruits and vegetables is an acceptable diet, with occasional fresh raw meat (not the rancid old package of beef left in the fridge too long). The best diet in captivity is the wild canid diet that zoos feed their wild creatures.

One of the amazing qualities of the Fennec Fox is it's ability to go for very long periods of time without drinking water. The kidneys of the Fennec Fox restrict water loss. The Fennec Fox also burrows in the ground, which helps retain water, and may also aid in building up moisture on the coat, which can be consumed. The fact that the Fennec Fox is nocturnal also help in protecting the creature from dehydration.

Another adaptation is the large ears of the Fennec Fox. The ears allow the Fennec Fox to hear very well. So well, that they can hear prey from a considerable distance. Not only can the Fennec Fox hear them moving in the sand above ground, but the prey can also be heard burrowing underground as well. The ears also aid in dissipating heat.

The sandy coat of the Fennec Fox not only helps in camouflage, but also reflects heat, helping the animal stay cool.

The furry soles of the Fennec Fox protect the fox from the burning sand and also aids in traction in the shifting sand.

The Fennec Fox usually gives birth to a litter of 2-5 young once a year, near the beginning of Spring, but twice is possible if the fox is healthy enough, and there is adequate food. Gestation is around 50 days, and the Fennec Fox is mature at about 10 months. The young Fennec Fox is greyish-white, gaining the usual desert coloration in the following weeks. They mature quickly, and only suckle for about a month. Grown male foxes are not allowed to enter the den until the young mature, but they do help the female protect the den.

Fennec Fox Stuffed Animal Plush Toy
Fennec Fox Stuffed Animal Plush Toy

Slightly understuffed body for incredible softness

Very detailed design to look adorably realistic

Quality fabric and ultra-plush stuffing

 

The Fennec Fox is extremely energetic. They have a lot of stamina, and like to play. The Fennec Fox is a burrowing animal, so they like to dig, they also bury their food. They are social animals, and can be found in packs. They are territorial, and males mark their territory. The Fennec Fox communicate with very high-pitched squeals, squeaks, and gurgles, they also wag their tails when happy or excited. The Fennec Fox will defend themselves when cornered or feel threatened, and are agile enough to escape if necessary. The Fennec Fox can also leap straight up a great distance in proportion to its body, which is used to escape if necessary, and they can dig so quickly that it almost seems that they disappear in the sand, escaping in this way also.

The Importance of Conservation

The Fennec Fox is approaching endangerment mainly because it is hunted for its fur. The Fennec Fox is a very important part of the Saharan ecosystem because it keeps the insect and rodent population in check. The Fennec Fox poses absolutely no threat to humans or livestock. Many animals have already been hunted to extinction, so the possibly is not remote. If the Fennec Fox population is decimated, the locust and rodent population would explode, damaging the livelihood of the Saharan people and those in surrounding areas. Disease from rodents could cause another epidemic. The Fennec Fox must be preserved to keep the delicate balance of the ecosystem intact.

The Fennec Fox is officially protected in Morocco, and select places in Egypt and Niger. According to ARKIVE, the fox is listed as 'least concern' because there is not enough information to determine its risk of extinction. More studies of the population in the wild need to be done.

The Desert Fox Family Book
The Desert Fox Family Book

A fascinating look at the Fennec Fox, with many beautiful pictures and detailed information, but written so that it could be understood by school-aged children.

 

Isn't the Fennec Fox beautiful?

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    • profile image

      Fabio 2 years ago

      more about 10 FAQ's about Revised GRENow you have learned about new GRE exam 2011, now use 20 Step GRE Exam Study guide to start panerripg.Related Posts GRE Exam Syllabus GRE General TestGRE Quantitative

    • profile image

      Fabio 2 years ago

      more about 10 FAQ's about Revised GRENow you have learned about new GRE exam 2011, now use 20 Step GRE Exam Study guide to start panerripg.Related Posts GRE Exam Syllabus GRE General TestGRE Quantitative

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      Yohan 2 years ago

      abarbara on This is the work done by Paula Gambin, Cherise Greach, Shannon Pace, Graziella Chetcuti and Megan Galea for the YRE coeiptitmonabarbara on This is the work of Grace Anne Muscat for the YRE coeiptitmon

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: what are the human effects

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: they are not supposed to e kept as pets but how can anyone resist they are so cute I want to be a vet and work with the lil cuties

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Adorable

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Fennec foxes are not pets they are wild animals . So if you don't want to hear horror stories about foxes being aggressive don't keep them as pets!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Beautiful and to think people hunt them for their fur ! Sickening Thought !

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      These are wondrous animals. They belong in the wild...not in homes as pets. Shame on everyone who insists on 'owning' one. As if there aren't over five million domesticated animals being killed in shelters each year. This is what happens when humans domesticate animals....the abuse is endless...starvation...death...and shelters. Instead of feeling like you have to own one because they are so cute (and a lot of hard work for many years..don't forget)....you can do them a better service by advocating for endangered wildlife species and the necessity of their survival on this earth.. Sign petitions...donate to wildlife groups...Educate yourself and your friends!!! Don't buy one...such a selfish move.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      They are so amazingly adorable!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Yes this animal is so cute so it has to be protected

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Writing a report and making a diorama for this cute little creature!

      What type of plants would grow there and what else could be in the diorama??

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I Know

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      im using the fennec fox for my report they are so cute

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      yes it is. i now want one as a pet they are so freakin adorble

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Its URGENT to protect this animal. In marroco they are selling them without knowing that this is an endangered species!! Pure lack of information!!! Does anyone knows an organization protecting this animal? Please reply ASAP. Thanks

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am using this for my report!!! Perfect!! Well I finished it already and got a 97%

      YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      AWESOME HELPED WITH MY PROJECT A TON!!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      its the most agly thing in the wold with big bad ears !!!!sis never ask that agine is it cut .cut means agly agly \

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 5 years ago from Canada

      The Fennec Fox videos really surprised me. I did not envision Scout as being so tiny. They sure have loud little voices for such a large eared little fox. I would think the squeals would hurt it's ears.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      i want one, they are soo cute it isn't even funny. my cousin who lives in california has one. and i want one for my birthday. how much are they???

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      i am doing a fennec fox as an animal for adaptations do you think i choose the right animal because all i know is the reason why i picked a fennec fox is because i thought that it would an animal that would really teach me a lot about adaptation and guess what i got a 4 on the assignment oh i love the fennec fox

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      The fennic fox was for a reaserch project but.........................................I only chose it because it's adorable

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      its cool and furry

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: so do i

    • dc64 lm profile image
      Author

      dc64 lm 5 years ago

      @anonymous: You and lovelots were both correct, and I have just now added a habitat section. Thanks for the suggestion!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      need more info in habitat!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      it's a cutiieee

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      yes it is adorable the best I WANT ONE SO BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      needs more info like habitat

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      yes

    • Sher Ritchie profile image

      Sher Ritchie 5 years ago

      Absolutely! I first heard of the fennec in an Arabian folk tale - and for a long time I 'didn't quite believe there really was such an animal'. But it is real, and here's your lens about them! Thankyou for all this great information, and the videos are fantastic. This is a real animal; thanks for showing me! I love your lens, I've featured it on my lens http://www.squidoo.com/zoo-with-paper-animals-for-... - under fennec. Thanks for sharing!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I'm looking up fennec fox facts, the most i got is from here

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!! I WANT ONE

    • flicker lm profile image

      flicker lm 5 years ago

      Yes, it certainly is! What a wonderful article about this interesting creature.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      The femmes fox is so gorgeous and I am only doing homework but this is the best website ever and I like the videos

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      good info helps with report a lot

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      i have a endagered anima;l project in my class so me and my friend where researching cute endangered animals and we chose of course the FENNEC FOX!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      she is but why does she kepping running around the place

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      yea kind of

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      Arthur Russ 5 years ago from England

      The fox is my favourite dog, and this one is adorable. I always enjoy seeing the British Urban fox when we're honoured with their visit to our garden, but difficult to capture on film as they are so shy. Although I did manage to film one in Pool when we were going on holiday, and used that film footage as a basis for a Squidoo Lens.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I agree!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Aww, What an adorable and beautiful little creature :)

    • WindyWintersHubs profile image

      WindyWintersHubs 6 years ago from Vancouver Island, BC

      Thanks for the info on this cute little fox. I'm not sure about keeping exotic pets in the home but the little Scout sure looks happy in his home. :)

    • indigoj profile image

      Indigo Janson 6 years ago from UK

      It is indeed a gorgeous and very unique animal, and I hope it can be protected before it becomes at too great a risk. I heard that this was the fox that features in the famous children's story The Little Prince.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      When I first saw your picture of the Fennec Fox, I thought it must be closely related to the Dessert Fox, yup, they are the same amazingly adapted characters. Cute as can be and able to survive well where others would perish. What a voice that little guy has and who can keep up with that energy level!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      you can even keep them as pets now theres an article on it here: http://www.infobarrel.com/Exotic_Pets_-_The_Fennec...

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      Norbert Isles 6 years ago from Philippines

      I first read about desert fox as a metaphor for the great German military commander Field Marshall Rommel. This is the second time I read about the desert fox - this time about the real one - and they are indeed beautiful and must be protected. Your lens is very informative. Thank you so much.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      The fennec fox is look like a Chihuahua. I heard that it is the smallest fox in the fox family.

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      GramaBarb 6 years ago from Vancouver

      Just had to bless this adorable and important 'fox awareness' lens.

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 6 years ago from United States

      I am returning today to leave my April Blessings on this fabulous lens! Yes, I selected animals for my April 1 neighborhood. Imagine that! LOL

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      vixxycrowe 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I don't necessarily think that they should not be pets however most people that want exotic pets such as this have no idea how much work it will be and never meet the actual needs of the exotic pets. I have worked with many rescue agencies and seen a lot of problems due to the fact that people had no clue what their exotic pets needed or found out how much actual work they are and end up abandoning them which by the way is bad for the ecology when you introduce an animal that isn't normally in it. Or they end up giving it away or selling it and it just breaks my heart to see some of the things I've seen. I think the govt needs to start making people get a special license where they have to go to a class teaching about said exotic pet as well as volunteering so many hours in an exotic animal rescue in their area.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I agree with you completely

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I think that fennec foxes are soooooo adorable and how does anyone even dare to hunt them! I think we should help save them! Don't you agree? HELP SAVE FENNEC FOXES!!!!!

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      Ann 6 years ago from Yorkshire, England

      it really is thanks for sharing - Angel Blessed

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      cool

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      the fennec fox is such a beautiful animal i don't know how anyone could hurt them. its really sad how people hurt all these poor animals around the world for no reason. things need to change and soon.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: i know right :)

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: thats alot of o's

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      i can't believe people would hunt such adorable and gentle animals! Hunters are stupid.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      want 1 NOW.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      So adorable and cute! I want two of them for a pet. Can't believe people are doing crazy things for money.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      there so cute i think we should have them as pets

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 6 years ago from United States

      What an adorable fox! Scout seems perfectly content to be a pet and that lab seemed content to have him there. A very pretty little fox! I enjoyed reading about them and watching the videos.

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      vixxycrowe 6 years ago

      People just really don't understand that just because something is beautiful doesn't mean it belongs as something owned. Do I love foxes oh yes I do. Do I want one of course however do I have the proper room and environment for these cuties to be happy and at home and stress free? Some wrote that these are domesticated and not wild etc.. however if you look at any place that sells these animals they say if you don't have somewhere for them to dig they will use your furniture... those are instincts they have naturally because they used to be wild. Dogs have been domesticated for so long they know the difference between outdoors and indoors and will typically not soil in their sleeping area. Our fox we had when I was a kid did soil where he slept. You have to understand these animals are not truly domesticated yet it takes a long time to breed the traits that make a good domestic breed. I think only people that can give these animals a life that will mimic what they instinctually want should own these cuties not just any tom, Dick or Harry. I think that for purchasing exotic pets that you should have to attend classes on the specific animal you want so you know everything about them before you are allowed to buy one.

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      vixxycrowe 6 years ago

      @anonymous: it takes a long time for animals to truly domesticate. They haven't been breeding these animals in captivity long enough for them to have actually truly domesticated. Just because you bring an animal into your house and tame it doesn't necessarily make it a "domesticated animal" Once an animal has been tamed or domesticated it is hard to put them back in the wild. Which is one of the reasons I say that people that want exotic pets should not just look at sights that say what cuties pies they are but what truly show the actual care these exotics will need. There are so many animals that are abandoned as well as abandoned in ecosystems they shouldn't be in which can be bad for the environment just as much as for the animal itself just because people didn't realize how hard it would be or the potential for it to be high maintenance. Sugar gliders are great too I used to have two of them and when my stepmother stopped allowing them out to fly around in the "sugar" room they didn't live long after that because they got depressed from being caged up. We want animals to stay in their habitats and not become extinct. The ENVIRONMENT needs all of its wonderful creatures. sometimes nature nixes a type of animal but most of the problems with endangered species we have now are because of people that want to domesticate/tame wild animals, or those that covet their fur or their meat. PEOPLE are the blame for the extreme imbalances in our world. That is why many want to preserve places for these animals and help them to get back to the balance they had before man hogged up more land and hunted or killed them. Or how about people that let loose constrictors in florida because they got big and the people didn't want them anymore. That is horrible for the environment not only ended up in hurting people as well. Get with he program just because something can be tamed doesn't mean it should be.

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      vixxycrowe 6 years ago

      @anonymous: you get your facts right. Just because something was raised in captivity it takes a VERY long time to get out the certain instincts they will have from being a wild species. How would you like it if oh say aliens came to our world and said omg I just have to have that one as a pet and kept you locked up but they fed you well and gave you shelter but you were always stuck in a cage/enclosure or a house. I'm not saying that I think people shouldn't be allowed to have exotic pets.... But most people have no idea how to meet the needs of some exotic pets nor how to properly care for them... they just wanted them because they were cute and they leave the animals in an enclosure that doesn't fit the needs of the animal. I see you telling people time and time again to get their facts straight but it is you that is only looking through I want to own fennec fox glasses and you don't think about the other needs these animals can need to make them happy and not stressful in their life.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Fennecs can live for up to 10 years in the wild, a common lifespan among African foxes. Captive fennecs may survive for up to 12 years. ("Fennec fox", 2004; Smith, 1985) There isn't much of a difference of average lifespan so it's easy to assume that captivity isn't something that under the right care should harm them however, they are foxes and they are still not truly a domestic. You need to know what you are getting into before you take a pet like this into your home. Foxes can be very nervous and easily scared and stressed which can mean a lot of accidents on your furniture and floors. Not everyone is cut out for pets like this. I love foxes they are my fave animal we actually had a pet red fox when i was a kid and it was a lot of work and it tore up furniture and if someone dropped something and it made a loud noise our lil toddy would have potty accidents sometimes or pee himself if someone knocked on the door too hard. Also studies now may not necessarily show a true documentation of average life span in captivity considering a lot of places do not allow ownership of exotic animals and they hide the secret. Statistics can also be manipulated for those that want to be able to sell these beauties. I'm not saying that is the case you you need to understand that the focus of who paid for the studies many times and their specific agenda is what the focus of the data is.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      what did the fennec fox evolve from?

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      i love fennec foxes i think they are so cute

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      Stop domesticating wild animals!

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: well they live longer in captivity, which i think is better than dieing quickly in the wild

    • dc64 lm profile image
      Author

      dc64 lm 7 years ago

      @anonymous: The blog says 'approaching endangerment'. The Fennec Fox is wild in Africa and is officially protected in Morocco, parts of Egypt and Niger because of a drastic decline in the fox's population. It is listed as least concern because according to "ARKIVE", there is not enough information to determine its risk of extinction.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: ummm people don't just go out and take fennec foxes out of the wild for fun. They breed them in captivity, and many never know any other life besides that. In their natural habitat, they are hunted for their pelts, and are more scared because they'll die soon. Get your facts right hun.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: ummmm the fennec fox actually has a drastically shorter life span in the wild compared to life in captivity. In the wild they live around 6 years, and in captivity they can live up to 12 or 13. Please get your facts right:))

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: They are not wild animals, they are breded and tamed in captivity meaning they are not wild. They are also put under least concern because they are not endangered. They are cute animals and they make great pets, like any other dog. Just because it was once wild does not mean they have to be put back into the wild. Would you say that about dogs when they were being domesticated? Also, we would not be endangering their lives by putting them in captivity, we would protecting them from the snakes and other predators of the Sahara.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: The Fennec Fox is not endangered, it is classified under least concern. The blog is wrong, except for the part about poaching. Also, these foxes cannot go back into the wild because they have no knowledge of the wild, the fennec foxes being breded must be kept in captivity for they will die in the wild. Also, they have plenty enough in the wild, go and check if you'd like to be extreme.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      you guys are right they should be free so they can live longer :)

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: your right they should not be captive

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      yea they are

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      yes

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: I agree, these beautiful animals should not be held captive in homes, let them be free to wander and keep the population of rodents and insects down.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: They use there fury paws as a small defense as well as biting, but they normally defend themselves by running some distance and then digging underground, they are so fast at burying themselves that it looks like they just disappear.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: they eat insect, rodents, birds, eggs, berries, and grasses.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: in the Sahara Desert. and over most of the northern countries of Africa.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      They are beautiful and adorable, but i don't think they should be kept as pets. Their population is unknown, if there aren't many left then we could be endangering their lives even more. Besides, wild animmals should be wild, not captive. They seem adorable and would make good pets, but they should not.

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      yes, they are amazing

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      I think they are AWESOME

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: how r they ugly

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      im doing a report on the 4 school and my cousin has one that's how i found out what they r

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: me 5 wtf

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      me 4 lol!! lol!!

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: haha me too!!! :D and i think they're cute :)

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: OMG!Me 2!!!!LOL!They are just SOOO adorable!

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      yes!!!!!

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      I think theyare UGLY!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      im doing a report on them to

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: me 3 lol

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: ME too!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      i think they r so cute im doin a report on them 4 school.