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Remedies for treating dog vomiting and diarrhea

Updated on May 13, 2014
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.

My Dog just keep vomiting and has diarrhea

So man's best friend is sick, showing signs of vomiting and diarrhea, this can be as simple as your dog having an upset stomach to more serious issues of Parvo disease common in puppies not vaccinated.

Vomiting and Diarrhea can lead to serious fluid loss as it does in humans, which can leave your dog dehydrated and could even lead to death.

Causes of Vomiting and Diarrhea

Vomiting and Diarrhea can occur due to:

  • Diet: Drastic changes or certain food can lead to your dog having an upset stomach and so cause diarrhea and vomiting. Changes in diet could be as a result of changes in protein and carbohydrate, which can be as simple as moving from beef to chicken, or corn to potato.
  • Bacteria : Dogs naturally are scavengers and so they will at time go around and eat stuff such as: garbage and decay foods, this could possible lead to your dog contracting a bacteria, thus causing vomiting and the passing of watery stool, this is similar to when we contract certain bacteria.
  • Virus: The most popular virus seen in dogs is the canine parvo virus, a contagious virus that lead to gastrointestinal damage and serious dehydration in dogs. All canine lovers will know that they should get their dog vaccinated for this virus, generally the virus usually occurs in pups that are not vaccinated.
  • Intestinal parasites: Like being infected with bacteria, your dog by snooping around the yard can be infected with parasitic worms, that can lead to diarrhea and vomiting, this can be prevented as its no big secret that as dog owners we are to deworm our dogs at least twice a year.

Keeping your dog hydrated is very important

Just as in any human, diarrhea and vomiting will lead to dehydration in your dog if left untreated. Thus ensure your dog is well hydrated , therefore giving pedialyte and other oral rehydration salts , mixing small amount of salt with water or simply water will help your dog to keep hydrated and have a balance electrolyte which is key in ensuring your dog body function properly especially when having these conditions.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Treatment: Natural Remedies

The use of Pepcid ( dose 0.2 or 0.5 mg per pound) or pepto-bismol ( generally 2 tsp (10ml) per pound) is used , and they are great medications and are common for treating diarrhea and vomiting, with no serious side effect ever reported. Importantly, you should note, pepto-bismol have an added side effect of darkening your dog stool, however this is not harmful.

However, I believe just as I would not give my child a pet medication to treat a condition that my dog might have such as vomiting, the same goes for my dog.For me personally, natural remedies are the way to go, they have less side effects, if any, and they will overall promote the health of your dog digestive tract.

For treating diarrhea and vomiting, Runipoo Relief works wonders,(2-3 drops for your small , 5 for medium and 8-10 for large dogs in small amount of water,two to three times a day), now don't get me wrong there are other medications, but Runipoo Relief is what I use for my dog diarrhea relief and it has not fail, also its just as effective in cats. Furthermore stomach pain and gas sleepless and hiccups can also be treated with this medication.

However, as I would say to all my pet lovers, consulting with your Veterinary physician about the medications you wish to give your dog, will always help.

Remember

  • Ensure to keep your dog hydrated
  • Leash-walk your dog, as it promotes healthy bowel movement
  • Feed your dog small meals, for better digestion.
  • If the source of your dog vomiting and diarrhea is found such as garbage, remove or store them more safely.
  • Finally ensure your dog gets the best care always.

If this as been informative for you, just like and leave a comment, which could even be on other remedies you have tried.

Hope you and your Pet, even if not a dog will stay healthy and live long.


Comments

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    • profile image

      Sandra 

      2 years ago

      I have a 9 yr. old male Yorkie, and he has always been very healthy! The last 2 days he has been vomiting, but still anxious for his food! I can't afford a veterinarian! I will have to put him down, but I have his sister, who would miss him terribly! I am 81 yrs. old and can't lift him, he is a large dog!

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      3 years ago from Jamaica

      If you read the article you will see some of my recommenations

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      3 years ago from Jamaica

      The Runipoo can help, but also need to ensure your dog is well hydrated.

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      3 years ago from Jamaica

      Glad I could help

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      4 years ago from Jamaica

      Sorry to hear that, well The Runipoo relief as seen in the article is a natural over the counter medication that can relieve the diarrhea and vomiting your dog's are experiencing, so I would recommend you buy it and keep monitoring your dogs progress and if no improvement or symptoms worsen go to your veterinarian ,also keep them well hydrated with water.

    • profile image

      moe5525 

      4 years ago

      I have a mix of shih tzu and lasha alpso she has diarrhea and she vomits once in a while - what can I do? The vomiting is low like 2 times a day, this diarrhea is watery brown and like all diarrhea it's a mess and stinks! What can I do?

    • profile image

      Stella.wbk@hotmail.com 

      4 years ago

      I have less than 1 month old sisi , she is suffering from diarrea , please help me

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      4 years ago from Jamaica

      Your dog shaking and throwing up can be serious so taking them to the vet is ur number 1 priority. Also baking soda and water neutralizes the acids in their stomach and so can treat the vomiting. You can mix 1 teaspoon baking soda in 1 quart (or 4 cups) of water to drink. Sorry for the late response to these post not been on the site in a while.

    • profile image

      BuddyBunch 

      4 years ago

      I have a 6 mnths old labra...since morning he is suffering from diarrhoea n vomiting..nd also shivers.. Cud u pliz help me out ??

    • profile image

      Ralphjames 

      5 years ago

      I have a 1 &1/2 year old pit. He has watery stool and he throws up food and water, He also shakes some. Its very hard to see him sick this way. is there any thing I can give him over the counter that will help ? This is my e-mail address: ralphjames777@gmail.com please hurry ....

    • profile image

      Marian 

      5 years ago

      My pup gets diarrhea from eating Sod which I have in my yard. I am going to get rid of the loose sod now, and treat her with "Oral Rehydration Salts". And tell the person dumping Sod in my yard, along with topsoil, (the Top Soil is all we wanted here) not to come here anymore, as I told him two days ago, not to dump any Sod with the Soil, and within 5 min., he had dropped a trailer-load of earth mixed greatly with Sod. Your article helped me greatly with info on what to do for my pup.

    • myronjam profile imageAUTHOR

      myronjam 

      5 years ago from Jamaica

      Good point. Usually if the case becomes severe, that would mean you need to take a trip to the vet.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 

      5 years ago from New York

      Yes this has been helpful. I do think though severity of vomiting and/or diarrhea need to be considered before giving your dog anything. Dogs can dehydrate quickly so there isn't a lot of wiggle room if the problems are severe. In mild cases your suggestions sound like they'll work well.

      Voted up and interesting.

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