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Yancy2 ~ Medical Care for Felines

Updated on September 15, 2014

"Crusting Nasal Passages in Cats"

So much has happened in the life of this little nine month old kitty. Yancy has spent quite a bit of time under the care of doctors since she was first brought to the rescue home. We thought her followers would like to know how she's doing.Our little "Yum Yum" has adapted well to her femoral head ostectomy (hip) surgery and gets around like a big girl running, jumping and climbing. However another problem has surfaced for this feisty kitten, one that has two local veterinarians and a few at the University scratching their heads.

We noticed Yancy's breathing sounded as if she was congested. Holding her and looking closely at her nose we saw that her nostrils, particularly her left one, were partially blocked. They seemed to be continually crusting over causing a respiratory problem. We would clean them out as best we could but before long they were crusted over again, which made her breathing difficult.

Yancy fought this tooth and nail (if you get my meaning). She wasnt going to have anyone picking her nose without putting up a good fight. Yes, it is gross, but what else can we do?

As I'm writing this it is my hope that some veterinarian will contact us with a solution for this little bundle of love.

Photo by Favored1

Copyrighted Material by Favored1. Do not copy. Photo credit by Favored1 or Amazon unless otherwise noted. This artwork is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.



Yancy2 ~ A Purple Star Award

A purple star is awarded to an article for excellence in it's category.

Yancy2 received a purple star on January 28th, 2014. Thank You!

Petlinks System Curvy Two-Surface Scratcher

We bought this scratching toy for one of our cats. It's funny that the one we bought it for doesn't get to use it, because all the other kitties have claimed it as their own.

They do play and scratch on it, but mostly they fall asleep in the funniest positions. Not much time goes by before another car takes their place on this two surfaced scratching toy.

Yes, it does have a catnip feather toy that is attached by a spring. Yancy attacks it from underneath!

Petlinks Dream Curl Multi-Surface Scratcher with Catnip Toy
Petlinks Dream Curl Multi-Surface Scratcher with Catnip Toy

Curvy scratching post has a base rug with a scratching patch on the front side.

 
Photo by favored1
Photo by favored1

But I Don't Want to Go to the Doctor... Again!

Yancy - Little Yum Yum Update

Who would think a little 6 pound kitten would cause such a fuss? Well, if you had been to the doctor's as much as Yancy has, maybe you'd be on the snippy side also.Off to the vet and a round of antibiotics, Clavamox. The general opinion at the time was that she had a URI (upper respiratory infection).

A few weeks went by with no noticeable change, and a different antibiotic, Clindamycin was prescribed, with the same results as the first. Then the third and more potent, Azithromicin was given with again no change. Finally an anti-viral medication, Famciclovir was given. As of this writing she has been taken off all medication.

Her nose continued to crust over and her breathing still sounded as if she was congested.

Catit Design Senses Treat Maze

Keeping Yancy's mind off her medical problems isn't difficult when you provide her with fun "distractions" like these. Catit toys help to develop a cat's mind as well as providing them with many hours of fun.Look for the entire line of Catit Sense products designed to stimulate the mind and life of your pet.

Catit Design Senses Food Maze
Catit Design Senses Food Maze

We had one of these for our pups and our cat would try to take the treats. I would not recommend this for a regular food dispenser. They do have one though. Only use this toy when you plan on spending time with your pet. It is a fun way to have your cat interact with another one also. A great "critical thinking" toy for cats.

 

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Sinus Flush

The doctor recommended a sinus flush. (See photos below). This procedure was performed on Yancy where she had a small amount of air injected into her sinus passages in the back of her throat and exiting through her nose. Then a sterile solution was flushed through the same way. Everything came out clear and clean.An x-ray was also taken of her head at this time. The x-ray didn't show anything out of the ordinary. Her nose and nostrils were cleaned up. But within a day, her condition was the same as before.

The Procedure

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Yancy is intubated for the administering of "gas" anesthesia.  The large electrical cord going underneath the absorbent pad is for a warming blanket to help keep her body temperature up during the procedure.Inserting the flush tubing into the sinus area.  Part of the problem was that the equipment was too large.  Her nasel passages are the size of a toothpick.First the air flush.  The Doctor is using a syringe to gently push air through Yancy's sinuses and out her nose.Next the sterile solution is gently administered the same way as the air flush.The lights are on for a closer look at her throat and to remove the flush tubing.Yancy on the x-ray table.The Doctor positioning her head for the x-rays of her sinus and nose areas.
Yancy is intubated for the administering of "gas" anesthesia.  The large electrical cord going underneath the absorbent pad is for a warming blanket to help keep her body temperature up during the procedure.
Yancy is intubated for the administering of "gas" anesthesia. The large electrical cord going underneath the absorbent pad is for a warming blanket to help keep her body temperature up during the procedure.
Inserting the flush tubing into the sinus area.  Part of the problem was that the equipment was too large.  Her nasel passages are the size of a toothpick.
Inserting the flush tubing into the sinus area. Part of the problem was that the equipment was too large. Her nasel passages are the size of a toothpick.
First the air flush.  The Doctor is using a syringe to gently push air through Yancy's sinuses and out her nose.
First the air flush. The Doctor is using a syringe to gently push air through Yancy's sinuses and out her nose.
Next the sterile solution is gently administered the same way as the air flush.
Next the sterile solution is gently administered the same way as the air flush.
The lights are on for a closer look at her throat and to remove the flush tubing.
The lights are on for a closer look at her throat and to remove the flush tubing.
Yancy on the x-ray table.
Yancy on the x-ray table.
The Doctor positioning her head for the x-rays of her sinus and nose areas.
The Doctor positioning her head for the x-rays of her sinus and nose areas.

X-Ray Side View

This view shows the nasal passages from the side (they are so tiny and narrow). Notice how the intubation tubing shows up on the film.Photo by Favored1

X-Ray From Bottom to Top

This view was taken while Yancy was lying on her back. The Doctor said that both x-rays look normal.Photo by Favored1

Before

Ready for the doctor.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Just before the procedure.  You can see how her nose was totally closed over on one side.They put gel on their eyes to help them stay closed, and tape down the tongue.
Just before the procedure.  You can see how her nose was totally closed over on one side.
Just before the procedure. You can see how her nose was totally closed over on one side.
They put gel on their eyes to help them stay closed, and tape down the tongue.
They put gel on their eyes to help them stay closed, and tape down the tongue.

After

Crusting Removed

Photo by favored1
Photo by favored1

Her nose was cleared of the crusting as much as possible without causing the passages to become "raw". The next day it began to crust over again, and still does.Yancy's frame is very small, but she does not seem to have development issues.

Photo by Favored1

Information Needed

Photo by favored1
Photo by favored1

Getting the University Involved

Back to the Vet Clinic

Our Veterinarian called the University and spoke to a Doctor there. They recommended blood, throat and nasal passage samples be gathered and tested.Once again she was anesthetized, the cultures taken and blood samples drawn. The results all came back normal. No Herpes, which is often found in street or feral cats and passed down from mother to litter, and no viruses of any kind. Nothing to show what is going on or to even send up a flag that something might be wrong.

Photo by Favored1

March 2013 Test Results

Photo by favored1
Photo by favored1

These are the tests recommended by the University, and the results. As you can see, the results all came back negative. We were certainly glad to hear that, but now what?

Photo by Favored1

Still No Answers

Photo by favored1
Photo by favored1

As of today (March 30th, 2013) Yancy doesn't have a fever, although this little one has come into "heat." Having her fixed is another thing we have postponed several times, because of her health and all the medication she was taking at the time the surgery was scheduled.It has been recommended that Yancy have an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image) performed on her head area. The MRI images are taken in "slices". Each image is taken progressively from start to finish. So in theory, you can see the beginning, middle and end of any abnormality. The closest facility for an MRI for a cat is at the University which is a 400 mile round trip. The cost of an MRI for a cat ranges in price from $700-$1,500.00, depending on how far up the medical chain the reading of the results goes. Once again the pet needs to be anesthetized so that they will remain still during the imaging process. This along with pre and post procedure care runs the cost up.

Another suggestion is that of doing a sort of ream job on her nasal passages hoping to enlarge them. This is similar to what they do on humans. I have talked to people who have had this procedure done and was told that it was very painful and a majority of them said that if they had it to do over again, they wouldn't.

Allergies may still be an issue but we can't tell. Yancy has her own bed, eats dry kitten food and since the beginning uses corn cob litter. She doesn't eat meat or any treats (she won't I should say). She didn't develop this until a few months ago, so I don't know how it could be the litter. We just don't know at this point, but will keep testing until we find some answers for her.

Photo by Favored1 (Yancy March 16th, 2013)

Things Your Cat Will Love

PetFusion Ultimate Cat Scratcher Lounge.  [Superior Cardboard & Construction].  Beware 'cheaper copycats' with 'unverified' reviews
PetFusion Ultimate Cat Scratcher Lounge. [Superior Cardboard & Construction]. Beware 'cheaper copycats' with 'unverified' reviews

A great way to satisfy your cats urge to scratch. Get twice the use with this reversible lounge/scratcher. Large enough to hold more than one cat. Lasts longer than other brands.

 

Yancy March 30th, 2013

Yancy March 30th, 2013
Yancy March 30th, 2013

So This Is Where We Stand

So this is where we stand. We are still researching to see what Yancy's medical problem is, and daily clean her nose as much as she'll allow before resisting. She tends to let me do it for her more, I guess because I have smaller hands. We cannot use any gel to soothe the soreness, because it adds to the clogging of her passages.Yancy still has needs to have her nose "decrusted" as I call it, every few days. The good thing is that we have learned how to do it ... the bad things is that Yancy sees it coming and it takes both of us to hold her down.

If you know of another feline that has had this problem or are a vet and have any recommendations as to treatment for Yancy, please let us know. Everyone else, keep on praying for her. She is so precious and it's hard listening to her try to breathe through the congestion.

June 23rd, 2014 - Updated from January 25th, 2014 on her condition.

Image credit Favored1
Image credit Favored1

As of January 25th, 2014 Yancy still had to have a "de-crusting" in the nose on a regular basis. This photo was taken right after it was done. She has gotten stronger and faster at swatting us when we do it, but who can blame her.

It's now June, and Yancy still gets regular de-crusting done every few days, but now she is a lot faster and swats us when we do it. She does whimper some, because it is painful. Think of it as pulling a Band-Aid off quickly and you'll get the gist of it.

Her back leg has is more tender since gaining weight, because it puts more pressure on the muscle. Even with all she is experiencing, Yancy is coming up with new ways to get into a heap of trouble.

Yancy 6-20-14 on SmartyKat scratcher.
Yancy 6-20-14 on SmartyKat scratcher.

Yancy Rescue Kitty

5 out of 5 stars from 1 rating of Yancy

© 2013 Fay Favored

Have you any information on this condition that would help Yancy? - If so, please contact us.

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      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      @cmadden: Thanks, we hope so also. Just like Odan, she does challenge us at times. Yancy is like a toddler and runs from us when it's time for her to go to bed.

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      cmadden 3 years ago

      Yancy's adorable! I hope you can figure this one out - I've had a kitty with nasal congestion before, and the sound of a kitty having trouble breathing is frightening. Our Odan has sneezing fits; the doc hasn't found any reason for it and he isn't congested, so we're assuming allergies and keeping watch in addition to his twice yearly wellness exams. It most certainly hasn't slowed him down any....

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 4 years ago

      I hope Yancy is doing fine. I pray for you! :)

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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      @dibblecat: Yes, that's something we have considered, but haven't taken her off kitten food yet. She is so little we still want to keep her on it to help her grow, but we may need to change it. I can't seem to get her to eat any wet food though, so I'm not sure what else to do.

      Yancy doesn't have any itchy areas at all, so this is hard to figure out. Other than her nose, she seems to be fine. It has affected her breathing, which makes sense. When you mentioned "wheat" it sent signals that maybe it's the corn litter. We have used it since she was first operated on, but now you've got me thinking. I'm going to switch it just in case. There are natual "molds" in grains, so this may be something we hadn't considered.

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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      @anonymous: James, thank you for your information. My husband has heard of some of this, and we're going to ask the vet about it. The crusting is hard, but she doesn't have a runny nose. The doctor never said it was mucus, that's what we thought it was at first too. He wants to do some injections this week or next, but I'm not sure what they are yet. We'll post her progress as we go.

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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      @Camden1: Thank you. We're looking into new things every day. She's scheduled for more treatments soon.

    • Camden1 profile image

      Camden1 4 years ago

      Poor little kitty! Hopefully this mysterious condition will just clear on its own and Yancy will be able to breathe better.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Are there any other symptoms or just the crusting? What does it look like? Is it mucus? Sometimes systemic enzymes like serrapeptase can help to thin mucus. I know that there are pet formulations of these but I can't recommend one because I really don't know enough about the subject. Arthur Andrew Medical has a formulation for horses but it is more geared toward reducing inflammation and the pills are probably huge (also expensive!). Maybe your vet would know but I don't think its a very common practice among vets to administer systemic enzymes because they don't have well proven efficacy. Trying wouldn't hurt because they aren't dangerous as far as I know (although they do thin the blood so be careful if there are any complications that could arise from that). I hope Yancy gets better...

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      dibblecat 4 years ago

      Hi Favored1,

      You may want to change Yancy's food as this could be a food allergy. My cat Squeek had an allergic reaction to the dry food she was eating, turned out she was allergic to the wheat in the dry food. She had groomed her hindquarters raw and was miserably itchy. I switched her to canned, grain-free wet food and she has totally recovered from the allergy. I hope this helps!

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