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All That Yarn - Knitting Toys and Small items

Updated on July 26, 2017

A Bevy of Bears from the pattern.

Bottom 2 are with two colors of yarn, rest are made with ombre/variegated yarns.
Bottom 2 are with two colors of yarn, rest are made with ombre/variegated yarns.

Making Bears

I liked doing the knit pattern better than the crochet pattern since the knit bears are worked more in one piece from toes to top of the head with the arms, ears, and muzzle added separately.

The crochet bear starts out at the bottom and works up, with arms and legs done separately. The knit bear calls for stitching across the tops of the legs to make it “sit” but I think it is better to leave out that step so that they can stand. A little kid will most likely adjust the stuffing to fit their needs and it is easier to make it sit than to make the stitched one stand up.

I think the knit ones also come out a little tighter so that they have a more cohesive design. The crochet ones I have made tend to be fatter around the middle and the head, I’m guessing because of the design. They don’t look any fatter in the photos on the pattern, but maybe it’s just my interpretation of the design or something in the way I stuff it.

Also, the ears on both are different. The crochet ones are half circles while the knit ones are like little pillows (unstuffed). This also gives each bear a different look.

That’s why my preference is to knit a bear instead of crochet one. I just like the look of the knit ones.

I also like to use variegated yarns so each bear will have a unique look and “personality”. I have used two colors on some making the tips of the arms/legs and muzzle a different color like in the pattern. This works best with solid color yarns.

Knit and Crochet Bears

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The pattern book I used for all these bears.2 knit bears - ombre yarnsCrochet bear with yarn like knit bear's.Crochet bear in crayon colored yarn.
The pattern book I used for all these bears.
The pattern book I used for all these bears.
2 knit bears - ombre yarns
2 knit bears - ombre yarns
Crochet bear with yarn like knit bear's.
Crochet bear with yarn like knit bear's.
Crochet bear in crayon colored yarn.
Crochet bear in crayon colored yarn.

Parts to a Bear

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Knitting the legs, start at the tippy toes.Starting the body, both legs are joined.Working up the body to the head.At the top of the head.Sew the top of the head together and leave long tail to sew down the back seam.Parts to add on - ears, arms, muzzle.Parts joined onto the body. ( leaving long tails for sewing seams.)A finished, completed Bear with embroidered eyes, nose and mouth in black 3-ply yarn.
Knitting the legs, start at the tippy toes.
Knitting the legs, start at the tippy toes.
Starting the body, both legs are joined.
Starting the body, both legs are joined.
Working up the body to the head.
Working up the body to the head.
At the top of the head.
At the top of the head.
Sew the top of the head together and leave long tail to sew down the back seam.
Sew the top of the head together and leave long tail to sew down the back seam.
Parts to add on - ears, arms, muzzle.
Parts to add on - ears, arms, muzzle.
Parts joined onto the body. ( leaving long tails for sewing seams.)
Parts joined onto the body. ( leaving long tails for sewing seams.)
A finished, completed Bear with embroidered eyes, nose and mouth in black 3-ply yarn.
A finished, completed Bear with embroidered eyes, nose and mouth in black 3-ply yarn.

Other Patterns

I used to have a crochet Panda pattern that I think I got from Annie’s Attic, but now I'm not sure.

The unique thing about this pattern was that the black 4-ply yarn was split into 2-plys to make the ears, eye patches, and nose circle. It does not say that, but that is what I remember doing as the materials only say 4-ply yarn. I have not come across another pattern that does that technique.

One time I felt that pink and light blue yarn would work as well as black and white. My mother told me that she didn’t think a pastel panda would look like a panda.

Well, I went ahead and made my pink and blue one, and it was cute! My mother even said she thought it worked out better than she imagined it would. I know I have photos somewhere, but can’t seem to find them.

Panda pattern (and friends)

Panda toy (sitting on a canvas bag), knit dog puppet (my own adaption from old pattern), fabric mouse from sewing pattern circa 1970s-80s.
Panda toy (sitting on a canvas bag), knit dog puppet (my own adaption from old pattern), fabric mouse from sewing pattern circa 1970s-80s.

Pattern for Panda

I found the pattern. It doesn't say "Annie's Attic" but I'm pretty sure that's where I got it from. You can see my ears are placed higher on the head than this photo shows.
I found the pattern. It doesn't say "Annie's Attic" but I'm pretty sure that's where I got it from. You can see my ears are placed higher on the head than this photo shows.
Page 2, the legs.
Page 2, the legs.

Only photos and memories left from my work

I gave away all my bears so all I have are pictures to remember them by.

I will be making more in the future as I have variegated yarns lined up for a few more. It goes fairly fast to knit up a bear, so it’s just setting aside time to get going on one. I can usually get a couple of bears from a 4 oz. skein of worsted weight yarn, and have some left over for other small projects.

They are better warm weather projects as my fingers don’t get so cold and they don’t cover my lap like afghans do when I work on them.

Tiny buddies

Owl and Hedgehog from kits.
Owl and Hedgehog from kits.

Fox kit

Mochimochi Kit for Fox.
Mochimochi Kit for Fox.

Mochimoci kit knits

I came across a website for Mochimochi Land after I saw some cute interstitials on the Nickelodeon channel. They had some stop motion animation using knitted figures of Santa, reindeer, Snowman, Gnome, etc. It was so cute! So I did an internet search and found the site.

The creator of these is Anna Hrachovec and she has also published some books of patterns for various creations. She also has some free patterns on the web for a tiny Chicken, tiny Rose, tiny Girl Scouts, tiny Hearts, and tiny Bunnies, it takes very little searching as they are easy to find. Just type MochimochiLand.com free patterns in the Bing or Google search bar, and look on Anna’s blog. I made the Chicken with worsted weight yarn and it came out about 2” tall which is double the “normal” size of the pattern.

My sister really liked the snowmen and since she doesn’t knit I offered to make her some. The pattern was available on the website and I purchased it online.

After procrastinating for a year, I went back to the website and bought the kits. Since there was a special surprise kit for those purchasing a certain number of kits, I got a few more figures. There were Vikings, Cats, Pandas, Snowmen, and more. My surprise kits were the Owl, Fox, and Hedgehog patterns newly created in 2014.

I sat down at the kitchen table (so as to not lose hold of the tiny double pointed needles – US size 1) and got to work. I had to carefully count the rounds (I started with the Hedgehog) and keep track of where I was in the pattern by moving a marker down the page as I worked.

It took me about two and a half hours to finish the first one. I did it all in one sitting so I would not lose my place and forget where I had to go next.

My next project was the Owl (there is enough material in a kit to make 2 or 3). It took about 2 hours to make that one. My last project was to make the two Snowmen from that kit. They took a little less than two hours, but pretty close to it from start to finish.

I liked how they turned out and wanted to sell them for the Needle Guild’s silent auction that is held before Christmas every year at the county library to raise funds for needlework books. I had to write to the creator of the patterns to ask permission (she says on the website to ask first, as she discourages selling them for profit). She said it was ok as long as I put up a sign for Mochimoci Land’s website. I put both the Owl and the Hedgehog in the auction.

I priced them at $5 each as they sell for $12/kit. Either they were so tiny no one noticed them, or they thought the minimum bid of $5 was too high. Anyway, they didn’t sell so I still have them. My sister got the two Snowmen from that kit as her gift that year.

I like doing these, but most likely will end up giving them away as gifts since I can’t sell them. They are fun but it is tiny detailed work so it takes concentration and no distractions (at least for me). I still have the other kits to try. I want to make a Viking to give to my friends of Scandinavian descent. I think they’d get a kick out of having a tiny Viking hiding on their book shelf.

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