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All That Yarn - Making Scarves

Updated on July 26, 2017

School Colors Set

Maroon and Golden
Maroon and Golden

Reasons to Like Scarves

I like scarves, for several reasons. One main reason is I like to keep my neck and face warm in the winter months. We have a lot of wind so when it’s cold there is the Wind Chill Factor to consider. A nice warm thick scarf can help prevent a chilly face.

Another reason is that they are easy and fairly quick to make, most of the time. I have tried to teach scarf classes at the Rec Center, and it goes over very well. I based it on a 2-hour scarf pattern from the Lion Brand website’s free patterns.
The scarf takes one ball of Fun Fur and one ball of Lion Brand Boucle yarn. Unfortunately, the Boucle has been discontinued for some time, so newer patterns show Homespun instead. The pattern is very fast and easy as it is all knitting (garter stitch) using 2 strands of yarn – one of fur and one of boucle type.
In my class I’ve had knitters and crocheters who both finished a scarf in about 2 hours time. I set the class time for 3 hours to make sure the slower knitter or crocheter can get close to done by the end of class.
The knitting needle sizes run either 19 or 35 (US sizes) and there are even patterns for 17 or 15 or 13 size needles. The crochet hooks called for are either P or Q (US sizes).

I found a bunch of the Lion Brand Boucle on the yarn sale website called Smiley’s Yarn. I purchased several skeins from them for my class. I found the Fun Fur on clearance or sales, some at LionBrand.com in multipacks of 3. I have also found it on eBay.
As an assist to the class I offer them the choice of colors of what I have for both yarns. I bring in a couple of plastic bins (40 quart size) of the yarns, as well as the knitting needles and crochet hooks they need for the patterns.

I tried the pattern off the skein wrapper from Red Heart’s Bright & Lofty yarn. This is a simple pattern for a lengthwise scarf of 6 rows. I had made my mother a scarf with the bright blue shades of Bright & Lofty. Many people liked the color, and the pattern worked up very fast so I was able to make another one for a friend who wanted one.
Since that yarn is now no longer available, the last time I taught the 2-hour scarf class I used some Light & Lofty in the Puff color (white) to try the pattern. I had similar results but since there is more yardage in Light & Lofty yarn, compared to Bright & Lofty, I was able to make several more rows than the pattern called for, when crocheting it. The knitted version had almost 1/3 of a skein left while the crocheted version had a few yards left. The knitted one takes size 17 knitting needles, and I found out the hard way that I needed circular ones for class instead of straight ones of 14” long. The student who tried this pattern struggled with getting the amount of stitches on the needle and then working them off. But she was a tight knitter so that was part of her problem with this yarn. The pattern’s 106 cast on stitches takes a lot of space on a 14” needle with using such a thick yarn. Crochet is 107 chains, with all single crochet back and forth for about 6 or so rows through the back loop.

My Hats and Scarves

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Using 2 strands of Worsted Weight Red Heart yarn in white and off-white.Close up of detail.Close up of hat detail. (School colors set)Close up of scarf detail. (School colors set)
Using 2 strands of Worsted Weight Red Heart yarn in white and off-white.
Using 2 strands of Worsted Weight Red Heart yarn in white and off-white.
Close up of detail.
Close up of detail.
Close up of hat detail. (School colors set)
Close up of hat detail. (School colors set)
Close up of scarf detail. (School colors set)
Close up of scarf detail. (School colors set)

It is a fun way to play with the available colors and come up with some very pretty combinations. I made two scarves where I used the same Boucle color but different Fun Fur colors. Each one looked very different. The fur part sticks out so it colors the scarf more than the boucle which is more of a background color.

Fast Scarves - Fuzzy Scarves

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2 strands of Fun Fur yarn. [Crochet Soft Furry Scarf pattern]1-Hour Scarf using Fancy Fur (discontinued) yarn. [will also work with plain Fun Fur]1 or 2-Hour Scarf, pattern using Lion Brand Boucle (discontinued) and Fun Fur yarn.Fun Fur and a bulky yarn. One Hour Knit Scarf pattern.
2 strands of Fun Fur yarn. [Crochet Soft Furry Scarf pattern]
2 strands of Fun Fur yarn. [Crochet Soft Furry Scarf pattern] | Source
1-Hour Scarf using Fancy Fur (discontinued) yarn. [will also work with plain Fun Fur]
1-Hour Scarf using Fancy Fur (discontinued) yarn. [will also work with plain Fun Fur] | Source
1 or 2-Hour Scarf, pattern using Lion Brand Boucle (discontinued) and Fun Fur yarn.
1 or 2-Hour Scarf, pattern using Lion Brand Boucle (discontinued) and Fun Fur yarn. | Source
Fun Fur and a bulky yarn. One Hour Knit Scarf pattern.
Fun Fur and a bulky yarn. One Hour Knit Scarf pattern. | Source

When I used the variegated furs there was enough yardage to match the boucle’s yardage. But when I used a solid color fur, I ended up with about 8-12 yards leftover. I put this to use by making a scarf of just the fur (in stockinette stitch) and tied on other leftover fur yardage as I finished up the previous one. It made a nice multi colored almost color-block scarf.

Stripes of Fun Fur

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Multiple Fun Fur skeins used.Fun Fur accents with worsted weight yarn.Fun Fur in Stripes (also a good way to use up leftover yards from other scarves).Half Red and Half Purple Fun Fur
Multiple Fun Fur skeins used.
Multiple Fun Fur skeins used. | Source
Fun Fur accents with worsted weight yarn.
Fun Fur accents with worsted weight yarn. | Source
Fun Fur in Stripes (also a good way to use up leftover yards from other scarves).
Fun Fur in Stripes (also a good way to use up leftover yards from other scarves). | Source
Half Red and Half Purple Fun Fur
Half Red and Half Purple Fun Fur | Source

Here's some free patterns for scarves.

Here’s the pattern, below.
Note: Any chunky yarn of size 5 (on the standard yarn label sizes) will work since both Bright & Lofty and Light & Lofty are discontinued from the Red Heart line.
Copied from the Red Heart Bright & Lofty yarn label inside patterns:
One Skein Scarf designed by Marilyn Coleman (copyright on label is 2004)
Scarves measure approximately 4.5” x 64”
One ball per scarf (Bright & Lofty yarn is 95 yards, 4 oz., Super Bulky “6”, 100% acrylic)
{discontinued in about 2007. Light & Lofty will work, but it was also discontinued in Feb. 2016.}
KNIT scarf:
Circular knitting needles size US 17 (29”), 12.75 mm
Knit Gauge: 5 stitches = 3”; 11 rows = 4.5” in pattern.
Cast on 106 stitches. Knit 11 rows. Bind off. Weave in ends.
CROCHET scarf:
Crochet hook 11.5 mm (US “P”-16)
Crochet Gauge: 5 stitches = 3”; 6 rows – 4.5” in pattern.
Chain 107.
Row 1 (Right Side): Single crochet (sc) in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across; turn. 106 sc.
Row 2 – 6: Chain 1, sc in back loop of each sc across; turn. Fasten off. Weave in ends

My October 2016 Pattern Note: I used Light & Lofty “Puff” (6 oz. skein, 140 yards) and was able to get 8 rows with crochet pattern and one skein with several yards left over. I quit after 15 rows on knit pattern and had about 1/3 of a skein leftover.
I did not use fringe on any of the scarves.

Here’s the Lion Brand pattern for crochet, using the Q hook:
Lion Brand® Fun Fur - Lion Bouclé Scarf
Pattern Number: 30235-C
SKILL LEVEL: Beginner
SIZE: About 5 inches x 42 inches [12.5 x 106.5 cm] NOTE Scarf will stretch with use.
MATERIALS
• 320-170 Fun Fur: Peacock
1 Skeins
• 930-206 Lion Bouclé: Hazelnut
1 Skeins
• Lion Brand Crochet Hook - Size Q-19
• Large-Eye Blunt Needles (Set of 6)
GAUGE: Piece is approximately 5 inches [12.5 cm] wide.
NOTES: Scarf is worked holding 1 strand of Lion Bouclé and 1 strand of Fun Fur together throughout.
SCARF
With 1 strand of each yarn held together, make a slip knot and chain 8.
Row 1 Single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and each chain across – 7 stitches. Turn.
Row 2 Chain 1, single crochet in each single crochet across. Turn.
Repeat Row 2 until all of one of the yarns is used, ending with a complete row. Fasten off and weave in ends.
*Fun Fur (Article #320) is a novelty "eyelash" yarn. Solids: 1¾/50g; 60 yd/54m per ball Prints: 1½ oz/40g; 57 yd/52m per ball 100% polyester.
*Lion Bouclé (Article #930) is a color-rich mohair blend that combines the textural curls and loops of bouclé with easy care. 79% Acrylic, 20% mohair, 1% nylon. Packaged in 2½ oz (70g) / 57yd (52m) skeins.

Here’s the P hook crochet version:
LION BRAND LION BOUCLÉ-FUN FUR
Crocheted Two-Yarn Quick Scarf
Pattern Number: 50335
Skill Level: Beginner
SIZE 3½" x 55" [9 x 139.5 cm]
MATERIALS
LION BRAND Lion Bouclé ball #202 Lime Blue (A) or color of your choice
LION BRAND Fun Fur ball #194 Lime (B) or color of your choice
LION BRAND size P-15 [10 mm] crochet hook
Gauge: double crochets = 3½" [9 cm] with 1 strand each of A and B held together.
SCARF
With 1 strand each of A and B held together, chain 6.
Row 1 Double crochet in 4th chain from hook and in each of next 2 chains; turn – 4 stitches.
Row 2 Chain 3, skip first double crochet, double crochet in each of next 3 stitches; turn – stitches.
Repeat Row 2 until Scarf measures 55" [139.5 cm] or until yarn runs out. Fasten off.
Weave in ends.
Bouclé (Article #930) is a color-rich mohair blend that combines the textural curls and loops of bouclé with easy care. 79% Acrylic, 20% mohair, 1% nylon. Packaged in 2½ oz (70g) / 57yd (52m) skeins.
Fur (Article #320) is a novelty "eyelash" yarn. Solids: 1¾/50g; 60 yd/54m per ball Prints: 1½ oz/40g; 57 yd/52m per ball 100% polyester.

Here are the knitted versions:
SKILL LEVEL: Beginner
NOTE: Scarf is worked holding 1 strand of Lion Bouclé and 1 strand of Fun Fur together throughout.
Knitted Scarf – using size 19 knitting needles
Size 5” x 52”, approximately
Materials
• Fun Fur 1 ball color of your choice*
• Bouclé 1 ball color of your choice* (approx. 57 yards)
• Size 19” scarf knitting needles
• Large-eyed, blunt needle (for weaving in ends)
GAUGE Piece is approximately 5” wide. Gauge is not essential but will affect size of Scarf.
SCARF
With 1 strand of each yarn held together, make a slip knot. Cast on 7 stitches – a total of 8 stitches.
Work in Garter Stitch (knit every row) on those 8 stitches until there is about 24” left of one of the yarns (might be more left of the other yarn).
Bind off all stitches loosely.
Weave in ends.


Knitted Scarf – using size 35 knitting needles
Size 6” x 47 approximately”
Materials
• Fun Fur 1 ball color of your choice
• Bouclé 1 ball color or your choice (approx. 57 yards)
• Size 35 scarf knitting needles
• Large-eyed, blunt needle (for weaving in ends)
GAUGE: 7 sts = 4” (10 cm) in Garter Stitch (knit every row) with one strand of each yarn held together.
SCARF
With 2 strands of yarn held together, cast on 10 stitches.
Knit every row (Garter Stitch) until approximately 24” left of one yarn (might be more left of the other yarn).
Bind off loosely.
Weave in ends.

Novelty Yarns - fuzzy and nubby.

I have tried to make furry scarves from eyelash yarn, which I got on the clearance rack. My sister says it looks like a muppet that needs some eyes added to it. The eyelash is not as comfortable as the fun fur yarns. I tried making an easy pillow cover with it instead.

When I first found the novelty yarns like eyelash, fur, boucle, nubby, etc. I experimented with mixing the novelty yarn with an acrylic worsted in a coordinating color. I have given away or donated most of those scarves. Some of the novelty yarns were not “thick” enough to make a good scarf, or there was not enough of it to do a smaller stitch to make it a little denser. It was easier to use a size 13 or 15 knitting needle with the 2-strands and about 12 stitches across. I usually quit the scarf when I ran out of novelty yarn as the acrylic was usually more ounces and more yards than the specialty yarn. I got a lot of them from “huge yarn lots” or “yarn from an estate” off of eBay’s auctions. There were some very interesting textures and colors. I also searched the local Hobby Lobby for clearance yarns when they stopped carrying a particular type. Seems when the trend was over that was when I started purchasing the trendy yarns.

Making Special Olympics Scarves

Now I’m working on my 4th year of knitting and crocheting scarves to donate to the local Special Olympics winter games. I got dragged into doing this when a co-worker wanted to do it and teach any other staff who wanted to learn to knit or crochet and help us make scarves. That first year was Navy and Cherry Red for yarn colors. I ordered about $500 worth of yarn from Red Heart (since they were the sponsors they had the colors). My co-worker paid me back for it and we handed out skeins of each color to our “students” at work. Some people managed only one scarf and others felt competitive so made a few. The co-worker and I made the most and I think I had one more made than she got done when it came time to drop off the donations. We had a total of 34 done. It filled a big cardboard box and then I had to wrangle it to the 2nd floor office where they were taking the donations (I’m glad there was an elevator).
We planned to do it again the next year but for some reason the Special Olympics decided not to ask for scarves or donations. Red Heart put out a notice that they had been told the SO didn’t want scarves, so they pulled their sponsorship.

A couple years later the individual states asked for scarves again for the Winter Special Olympics. The word went out on social media and blogs, so I was able to find out about it and spread the word to my knit/crochet friends. Every state wanted different colors, so if a knitter or crocheter wanted to donate a scarf then they had to check on what color combinations were wanted by which state. Some states wanted ear warmers and hats in addition to scarves. The Wyoming one wanted a Mist Green and White scarf. This became a problem as the only yarn that had Mist Green was Red Heart Classic which was not sold locally. White is easy to get, so the hunt for the green began. The website later allowed for any light green as they found people complaining about the scarcity of the Mist Green and Red Heart Classic availability.

The next year the colors were more “reasonable” to find. The 2016 colors were Black and Purple; the 2017 colors were Gold and Brown; and the 2018 colors are Black, White and Grey. It is more of a challenge to use 3 strands than 2 when trying to do a quick and easy scarf. I have found pictures of past scarves from other states that had a 3-color combination and that helped me make some choices.
One choice was to use the grey yarn as the main yarn and alternate rows with black and white. For example, starting with grey and black for 2 rows then switching to grey and white for 2 rows, and back to grey and black for the next 2 rows, etc. with carrying the unused color up the side in order to avoid lots of ends to tuck in later. Also, using all 3 strands on size 19 or 35 knitting needles works well, and uses all the colors without having to change out one or two every so many rows.
I found that using chunky yarns also goes faster on size 35 needles. I found that I had one skein of black Light & Lofty and one skein of white Light & Lofty mixed with a skein of chunky/bulky grey made for a fluffy scarf. I also tried a few length wise scarves, and had a few problems. I crocheted too many chains and ended up with 20” too much (the size they want is 6” by 60”). So I got creative and folded up 10” on each end to make pockets. This helped when I made my knitted lengthwise one also 20” too long, so it has pockets as well. Then I tried a pattern off the internet for a lengthwise using 3 yarns but alternating colors instead of using all 3 together. I tried to figure out the right length but ended up 10” too short. So I made 2 sections of 5” using the same striping pattern and sewed them to the ends. It looks a bit odd, but as they say “it’s not a mistake, it’s a design element”.

The main problem with the 2018 colors was that everyone has black and white in their stash, but the grey is not a “staple” of most yarn stashes. I had no grey yarn at all, so I had to quick order a bunch of it. Then I wasn’t sure if a lighter grey or darker grey was a better choice, so I got both. I also got both chunky and worsted weights of grey yarn since I had chunky black on hand. And I found that Red Heart’s worsted Zebra color had all 3 colors in it so that was easier to use without any added strands or changing of colors. I also had to order that since there was no supply of it in town.

Making Scarves to Sell

When I make scarves to donate or sell, I want to pay as little as possible for the yarn so that I can keep the prices on the finished scarves low enough to be attractive to customers. I have a bunch of the 2-hour scarves with fun fur and boucle priced at $20 each, and I don’t know if it is the price or the fashion season but they are not selling. Since I don’t have a store, but only take them to craft fairs, I don’t have a lot of requests for particular colors other than blacks or greys. No one it seems wants a white scarf. Guess they think it will get dirty.
I have some of the softest scarves which encourages a lot of “petting” of my merchandise by craft fair patrons. They really like the feel of the yarns but seldom buy any. I’m thinking I may need to make “display models” for pats and pets to keep people happy and keep my sale items a little cleaner.

Now it is up to You - what do you want to make?

So whether you want a quick gift, or you need to match a new coat, a Scarf is a good item to make in either knit or crochet. Sizes range from a yard or so long to 90 inches or longer for a Super Scarf. You can add pockets or fringe (or both) to your creation.
It is also a great way to use up scraps or practice a pattern like Cables (in knitting) before setting out to do that technique in something larger (like a sweater). You can pair up a hat with a scarf or just go with a fun scarf.
Whatever you decide to do, there are many free patterns and pattern books for sale that cover this deceptively simple item.
Have fun and play with colors, or yarns or what have you. It is a good way to practice your knitting or crochet stitches and make something practical at the same time. Most scarves don’t require a Gauge, so you can grab your yarn and tools and get going on a new scarf anytime.

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