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Basket Weaving - How to Weave a Gift Basket

Updated on May 2, 2018

Weaving an Oval Basket

A simple, rustic basket woven in a very effective combination of brown and white willow rods, would make a wonderful gift basket or garden basket.

If you are new to basket weaving and need additional help with the different weaves used in this article, make sure you check out my other article on Basket Weaving - A Beginners Guide. This will tell you all about the different weaves and terminology used in making your own gift baskets.

How to Weave the Oval Wooden Base

The oval base is worked on heavy white willow stakes, six inches long and fourteen inches long. They are not split, but are interwoven with the cross stakes treated as pairs. They are then fanned out as single stakes, with the exception of the center cross-wise pair, and secured in position by two rows of pairing with white rods.

Change to thinner brown rods and work twelve rows of randing to bring you close to the end of the base stakes.

Cut and soak thirty-seven by-stakes, about 18 inches long, of the lighter white staking. Continue to treat the center pair of original cross-stakes on each side as one.

Insert the new bye-stakes, one on each side of the originals and fins a suitable gap for the single odd one. Kink them and bend them up.

The angle of the basket is shallow on the short ends and right-angled in the handle area of the long sides, gradually sloping out. (study the shape in the photograph).

Trim and abandon the original stakes and work three rows of upsetting on the by-stakes in white willow.

Weaving the Brown "Hump"

Change to the brown rods and work eight randing rows. Now extra rows have to be added in an area on the long sides of the basket to achieve the humped shape.

Loop a brown rod around the fourth stake from the center pair and rand to the same point on the other side of the center. Then back again.

On the next two rows work only to the third stake on either side and then work two more to the two second stakes. Repeat on the other side.

Rejoin the white rod and work around the whole basket with two rows of waling. Insert a heavy white stake, soaked and sharpened, for the handle. Push it in postion through the randing.

Weaving the Border

Because this basket is so played, the inside is on show, so work the border so that the ends are cut off on the outside.

Take each stake in turn and bend it down and over the 2nd and 3rd, under the 4th, over the 5th, under the 6th and finish on the outside, cutting it off to rest against the 7th stake.

Securing the Handle
Securing the Handle

Weaving the Handle

Add two staking canes, already soaked, to reinforce the first handle cane, pushing them down on each side through the border and in for a couple of inches or so.

Then take four lengths of heavy weight weaving cane to bind and secure the handle, looping through the border (see illustration). Bind joints at each side with fine cane.

Finish the handle with an additional inserted stake. Bind it securely with three white weaving rods, running the ends back into the basket with a bodkin.

Source

Weaving a Rectangular Basket

This would be a very handy basket indeed. Use it for a gift basket, or a shopping basket, or any other use you can think of.

How to Weave the Rectangular Base

Start the base with five heavy-weight cross canes about 7 inches long and four lengthwise canes, 10 inches long. Slit about 1½ inch in the middle of the five shorter canes and insert the four long canes in the gaps, pulling them through to form a cross. The five canes should be about 1 inch apart, the long canes close to each other.

Work two pairing rounds on these stakes with the heavier weight of weaving cane. Then spread out the end of the long canes and insert four bye-stakes into the four gaps between these and the cross stakes. Now treat each of the twenty-two stakes separately and, keeping the spaces even, work on with pairing in the lighter weight weaving cane to complete the base.

Now insert thirty-four prepared by-stakes, 15 inches long. Push them about 1½ inch in through the pairing. Arrange them so that one is lined up against each of the original ten cross spokes.

The original twenty-two stakes will now be trimmed off. Soak the bottom so that you can bend up the thirty-four new stakes for the sides. With the thicker weaving cane work a row of pairing. Then rand on up, adjusting the shape as you go. Change to lighter weight weaving can halfway up. At top leave at least 5 inches of staking for border.

Before you start the border take a heavy cane of the right length pointed at both ends. Soak it so that it is flexible. Push it between randing, at least 4 inches in on both sides, to form the handle.

Work the 3-rod plain border as in the illustration below. To work the border on single stakes, clip off the second one of each pair before starting.

Weaving the Border
Weaving the Border
Securing the Handle
Securing the Handle

Add two staking canes, already soaked, to reinforce the first handle cane, pushing them down on each side through the border and in for a couple of inches or so.

Then take four lengths of heavy weight weaving cane to bind and secure the handle, looping through the border (see illustration). Bind joints at each side with fine cane.

These are easy to make and with a little thought before hand and choosing your materials for effectiveness, the patterns in the basket can be designed in any color you wish.

Thanks for stopping by & Happy Crafting!

Try Weaving with Newspaper

© 2013 Dawn

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      Darrance 3 years ago

      This is just the percfet answer for all forum members

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      Jaycee 3 years ago

      Articles like these put the consumer in the driver seat-very imarntpot.

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      Susan 5 years ago from India

      Wow. This is so interesting. Will bookmark this. Thanks for sharing in creative hub. Voted up.

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