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DIY Water Droplet Photography

Updated on August 5, 2015
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What You Need:

So let's first start with a few of the things you'll need!

Camera - what I used: Nikon D5100 with 18-200mm lens

Off-camera flash - what I used: tt520 flash speedlite

Flash trigger - what I used: Aputure Trigger Trigmaster

Tripod

Glass dish

Colored paper

Bag of water

Something to hang the bag of water on

As you can see, it's such a simple setup.  I liked having a white wall that my flash could bounce off of. It helped in distributing the light.
As you can see, it's such a simple setup. I liked having a white wall that my flash could bounce off of. It helped in distributing the light.

Lights, Camera, Actions!

Connect your camera to tripod. Now let's set the camera settings! Turn your camera to Manual setting, and set it to take RAW and JPG (if possible). I've found for dim light these settings work the best: f/14; shutter: 1/13; ISO: 100. Note: depending on how dark the room is, you might have to change this slightly. Connect the flash trigger.

Set your flash on Manual Mode at 1/4 power. Connect your remote flash trigger.

Hang ziplock bag of water from a short lamp (or anything it can hang from), and secure it with either a twisty or clothespin.

Fill glass dish with water and place under bag.

Setup colored paper and place behind glass dish.


So we have our setup in place. Are you ready?!

Take a toothpick or straight pin and poke a hole in the bottom of the bag.

Now zoom in with your camera and set focus (you can either allow your camera to auto focus or you can do it manually), once set, set focus on your lens to "manual" and turn off vibration reduction.

Turn all equipment on and either manually press shutter button, set timer for shutter, or use a shutter release remote control. Dim lights and fire away!

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Post Processing

Even though I love photo editing, it's a pretty awesome feeling when you don't have to do much post processing!

Open your RAW or JPG images in your editing program, I use Affinity Photo, and make any changes that you think are necessary, and don't be afraid to get a little creative (like... changing the color of your images).

And voila! You have amazing water-drop photography! How cool is that?!

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    • Craftypicks profile image

      Lori Green 2 years ago from Las Vegas

      I love water droplet photography especially when done really well.

    working