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Salvador Dali's Crucifixion - Analysis

Updated on October 17, 2016

Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) by Salvador Dalí. (1954)

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

The image shown here is claimed to be used under fair use as:

  • It is a historically significant painting, as per the information in the article.

  • The image is only being used for informational purposes.

  • Its inclusion in the article adds significantly to the article because it shows the art of the subject of this article and how the image depicted is familiar to the general public.

  • The image is readily available on the Internet.

A surreal crucifixion

Dali's paintings make a great intro to surrealism and modern art. Look at this one. If not for the cubes, Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) would look, at first glance, like an old master's piece.

Surrealism is the rendering of dreams in literature, art or music. Surrealists were influenced by that old Freud, Sigmund. Dali's brand of surrealism consisted of double images, floating objects, morphs....the stuff of dreams. For example, he has painted self-portraits on one of the knees of the crucified Christ, and the cubic cross floats above a giant chessboard. His wife, Gala, stands beside the cross, possibly standing for Mary Magdalene. What say, Dan Brown?

The cube motif is everywhere. Gala stands on one, the floor has black and white squares, and the four cubic nails form a square. Does the hypercube symbolise space-time? Does Dali mean that Christ is the Lord for all eternity, not bound by the limitations of time? He rose on the third day, didn't He? That message is rendered as a visual oxymoron. The world was given a Christ and they crucified Him. But did he stay transfixed? Only in images and sculptures. On the third day, He chose to transcend space time and rose.

Here, Dali shows Him fixed to the cross, but not fixed. He levitates, and projects Himself. Rising above His mortal avatar, His suffering, the earth's gravity, hate, war, death, passions...everything. Get it? The buoyancy of Absolute Love versus the gravity of hate.

What is your insight?

Christ of Saint John of the Cross by Salvador Dalí, 1951

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow

The image shown here is claimed to be used under fair use as:

  • It is a historically significant painting, as per the information in the article.

  • The image is only being used for informational purposes.

  • Its inclusion in the article adds significantly to the article because it shows the art of the subject of this article and how the image depicted is familiar to the general public.

  • The image is readily available on the Internet.

Divine Light

I love Dali's dreamy lighting. That's half the secret of the timelessness of his paintings. You can stand there looking at it for hours, and it can seem like a minute to you. Or possibly days. The light contributes to that effect, along with the geometrical composition.

I learnt to draw shadows from this picture. Look at the detail where I zoomed up the shadow of the hand. Crisp shadows, almost like Caravaggio's. Except they are not dark, but more realistic.

The Hidden Geometry

By now, after the Last Supper you must be quite an expert at finding out the hidden geometry of visual art? You are a great student of Art! Come here, please, and discover for yourself before reading what I think. Click on image to view bigger and better.

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Well, see if we match. If we do, then we congratulate each other. If we don't we learn from each other!

There is a heavy vertical grid, obviously by the presence of the cubes. Vertical lines, subliminally evoke feelings of stability, monuments, edifices, spiritual progress...Why? Think about it. The horizontal lines add to the stability of earthy matters. And provides a base for the subject.

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There are two triangles formed if you notice. From the Last Supper, you know that triangles mean stability and security. But not when they are inverted! The inverted triangle creates a feeling of tension and uneasiness inside us. Like a big cone about to topple. Here Christ is an inverted triangle, designed to create a little tension and dynamism in the picture. See?

To illustrate this concept further, I show you another crucifixion Dali did. See the inverted triangle? That's the painting I'm going to do next time. By which time, you will all be experts at reading the secret geometry of art. Praise be to God.

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.After that, since you have been a good student, gentle reader, I give you a light break. Enjoy the video!

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    • funride profile image

      Ricardo Nunes 9 years ago from Portugal

      I have no words capable to describe how much I´ve liked all of your art hubs. About this one I´m suspect because Dali is one of my favorite painters of all times.

      About the 'Christ of Saint John of the Cross', even though I´m still learning from you, I see Him looking above towards the earth at the same time He is also illuminating it with bright colors that contrast with the darkness around Him.

      And to show I already learn something eheheh I can tell you that there is another inverted triangle represented by Christ and also several horizontal lines represented by the cross, the hills and the clouds.

      I´ll be looking forward for your hub with your master takes.

    • profile image

      Iðunn 9 years ago

      I love this:

      "Here, Dali shows Him fixed to the cross, but not fixed. He levitates, and projects Himself. Rising above His mortal avatar, His suffering, the earth's gravity, hate, war, death, passions...everything. Get it? The buoyancy of Absolute Love versus the gravity of hate." <-----you

      another wonderful hub. I love dali anyway. nice choice. :)

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you Funride! Now what's left for me to analyse, LOL!

      Ah, Iðunn, you know my secret! The best way to make me blush and mumble is to quote me to me! Thank you, kind soul!

    • profile image

      Iðunn 9 years ago

      you're considerably more quotable than I am. :p

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      There I beg to differ, but I appreciate the graciousness behind the statement, and accept it in kind. Thank you.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image

      Patty Inglish 9 years ago from North America

      I realize that this is the first time that I have seen the complete paiting. Now I can view the figure standing below. Kenny, you have given me many more dimensions of reality with this fine Hub.

      Patty

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Dimension is the key to this, Patty, right! Thank you!

    • Wehzo profile image

      Nathaniel Stalling Jr 9 years ago from Detroit, MI

      Kenny, I must admit, I am a new student of art. I really enjoy your hubs and your analysis of each piece. I've learned some important things about art from you, thank you. Keep them coming.

    • In The Doghouse profile image

      In The Doghouse 9 years ago from California

      Kenny

      Once again you have given me an opportunity to ponder the beauty and message of true art. At first glance I tend to shy away from this type of art because surrealistic art is more for the abstract thinker than I view myself to be. Upon taking the time to ponder this piece however, I wonder if to truly enjoy surrealistic art more time must be invested by the viewer. That said I have found by pondering on the beauty of the picture some incredible insights I might have otherwise missed.

      By noticing the inverted triangle that is formed by Christ and the cross, I have been reminded that the inverted triangle is a symbol of the condescension that a God made to atone for the world, or man. Basically, it is heaven pointing toward earth. The image of the artists self-portrait that is in the knee of the Christ is a suggestion to me that he as accepted Him as his savior, thus "every knee will bow and every tongue confess, that Jesus is The Christ" becomes evident at the placement of the portrait. The positioning of Gala his wife in the position of the triangle looking toward heaven, is symbolic to me of man looking toward God. When those two triangles converge they form the six-pointed star. In the scriptures stars are often used to symbolize endless posterity of those who are faithful to the Abrahamic Covenant. When a husband and wife enter into that covenant together with Christ they have a potential of receiving those promises. The cubes or squares represent to me, the earth or the world, sometimes referred to the "four corners of the world". I feel that with the amount of these symbols present in this picture it may suggest that the Atonement was infinite and eternal, a gift to everyone. Christs free floating position also suggests that he over came the world. Obviously, I have gleaned a lot from your art classes... for this I am grateful to you.

    • Isabella Snow profile image

      Isabella Snow 9 years ago

      That video was great! Great hub, too! :)

    • VioletSun profile image

      VioletSun 9 years ago from Oregon/ Name: Marie

      Kenny, don' want to embarass you but I have never met a teacher of art like you! You are indeed a gift to the community; not only do you provide us with great hubs, your kindness in how you treat everyone shines through. As you can see, I am a fan of your hubs. LOL!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Dear Wehzo, I am delighted to have a 'new' student. Thank you for the honour of allowing me to be your first guide to art! :)

      Oh, wow, Doghouse! I invited Dan Brown, and I got a better guy: you! That was wonderful! Now, visitors will read your analysis and be inspired! Enthused is the word, I think.

      Thank you, Isabella! Fun video that! :)

      Violet, I don't mind this embarassment, thank you! 

      Don't look now, but your kindness is showing. 

      Through your comment, LOL! 

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      you are wonderful kenny..am speechless..any way to far above this simple one sitting here commenting to a professor of EVERYTHING.Loving what you do..am happy about that first sleepless night!!!! G-Ma :O) hugs

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      I'm only a jack of all trades, G-ma, and not far above. Not far, either, thanks to the internet. I feel you very near, actually. What simple one? You?

      You have seen it all, G-Ma. 

      But you are SIMPLY super and SIMPLY kind! Hugs. :) 

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      Oh you are a rascal aren't you? always a kind word for every one..I guess that is why you are so well thought of....and I think a lot of you G-ma :O) Hugs

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      First time I love being called a rascal, hehe! Hugs, G-Ma.

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      you keep changing your photo...just to keep us all on our toes? This is a good one..:O)   Hugs G-Ma :O)

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      My son keeps doing it, and anyway, you didn't like the last one. Ah, thanks for liking this. :)

    • Paraglider profile image

      Dave McClure 9 years ago from Kyle, Scotland

      Hi Kenny -

      Great work, again. The Christ of St John of the Cross is probably the first painting I was consciously aware of. We used to live not too far from Glasgow and often went to the Kelvingrove Museum (usually just called the Art Gallery by the locals). I'm talking about the 50s, when the painting was pretty new. For years, they hung it not in a gallery, but at the top of the main staircase leading up from the museum floor to the art floor. The setting was magnificent and the strong symmetry of the Victorian architecture was the perfect background, extension almost, of the painting. Much later, probably in the 80s, the painting was moved to a new Museum of Culture (I think) in another part of Glasgow. But the setting was not a patch on the original, and besides, Glasgow folk don't like 'their' traditions being messed with, so after much protest, it was returned to its proper home in Kelvingrove.

    • MrMarmalade profile image

      MrMarmalade 9 years ago from Sydney

      Kenny you have stun me and surpassed yourself.

      Kindness in abundance

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      Hasn't he though MrMarmalade....

      Kenny..... and so what if I didn't favor the last photo?...so your son is having fun with you...good and you seem like.... it is fun also..Good dad that you are.I wish I had more photo's to show that are good..oh well this is not a chat line...sorry G-Ma :O) hugs

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Paraglider, thank you for that nugget of information. I didn't know all that, this is much appreciated. Did you know you were very lucky? I haven't seen any of the paintings I talk about, live.

      Frank, it's my pleasure to kindly stun you.

      G-Ma, please post more photos. 

      I love your existing one, but would like to see you from more angles. Hugs.   :)

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      Oh dear here is one on a cruise ship with the chef's in the galley>>>> what fun G-Ma :O) hugs

    • G-Ma Johnson profile image

      Merle Ann Johnson 9 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

      No I changed it again...this is in my kitchen..hee hee.  G-Ma :O) hugs you can delete the one above sweetie

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      I missed the ship one! :( Now'll go check your pic in your profile, a bigger and brighter G-Ma!

    • LdsNana-AskMormon profile image

      Kathryn Skaggs 9 years ago from Southern California

      Kenny -

      I have truly been edified today.

      tDMg

      LdsNana-AskMormon

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      And I'm humbled and honoured by that! Thank you, Nana!

    • djtphn1 profile image

      djtphn1 9 years ago from Riverside County, California

      Beautiful hub, Kenny, thanks.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Debbie!

    • Zsuzsy Bee profile image

      Zsuzsy Bee 9 years ago from Ontario/Canada

      Quite an amazing painting

      great HUB

      regards Zsuzsy

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Amazsing Bee!

    • profile image

      Iðunn 9 years ago

      miracles. the rose-coloured glasses replaced, the smiles all real, and miracles raining from the heavens infusing my soul with rose-petals and thoughts of poetry about love.

      that is all. :)

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Wonderful, Iðunn, wonderful! I am delighted.

      That is enough. For now. :)

    • profile image

      Iðunn 9 years ago

      rose petals are warm, kenny, warm and sweet. they taste like burgundy wine.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Dear poet, you sound drunk on the wine of happiness and your avatar looks like burgundy in a glass! :)

    • profile image

      Iðunn 9 years ago

      Dear artist, I feel like burgundy in a glass, so then it's the correct choice at this time. :)

    • profile image

      Abhinaya 9 years ago

      Kenny look at all the comments you have here.I am speechless.I can comment on the art part but I know very less about Christianity,though my best friend is a true Christian.I am trying to learn.Thanks for all the info.Geat hub!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Iðunn, hope that's a good thing,and you can flowr out whenever you want to. Free Burgundy!

      Thank you, Abhinaya. That's okay. I was an atheist when I first saw this painting but did not appreciate it the less for that. :)

    • sim71 profile image

      sim71 9 years ago from Norwich, Norfolk, UK

      I really enjoyed this insight into Dali, I'll keep an eye out for your other hubs.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you Sim! Hope you read the next one on Dali, too.

    • cgull8m profile image

      cgull8m 9 years ago from North Carolina

      If Dali had been alive he would be impressed with your explanation, not everyone can deduce it. Great painting and analysis. Cheers.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you for that compliment, Cgull. I hope he'll be impressed. :)

    • rmr profile image

      rmr 9 years ago from Livonia, MI

      I don't know much about art, but I do love Dali. I'd love to hear your take on Persistence of Memory.

    • profile image

      tin 9 years ago

      thanks for the analysis. I must admit that you have really seen deeper, and unveiled geometry in this particular painting. I am still starting to appreciate art, and with that comes a requirement I need to fullfill: an oral exam explaining the corpus hypercubus. thanks for the idea

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Rmr, thank you. Think I'll do that, too, soon.

      Tin, thanks for the appreciation. 

      I'm hoping that I'll start everybody off in being with art longer than usual, 

      and gaining their own unique insights. 

    • Retro Mama profile image

      Retro Mama 9 years ago from Canada

      Wow, you are pretty intense for a children's book illustrator!

      Really great hub, I love Dali.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Hehe, Retro Mama, this is my secret side, like Mr Hyde!

      Thanks for a unique comment!

    • Joni Solis profile image

      Joni Solis 9 years ago from Kentwood, Louisiana

      >The buoyancy of Absolute Love versus the gravity of hate.

      Thanks for posting this hub. Your insight has delighted me.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Aw, what is the use of an insight if it's not shared? Your comment has buoyed me up, thanks, Joni!

    • WildwindE profile image

      Laurie J. Brenner 9 years ago from Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada, CA

      I have loved Dali since I was a teen. And I ain't no teen no more. Back in my late thirties - early forties I got to go to Washington, D.C. to the National Art Museums (there's the East and West one). I just did not get to spend enough time there. I love artists, art and art museums (along with SCIFI and fantasy as well!)

      Beyond being struck by a Monet from about 60 feet away - when I went downstairs (into the tunnel that connects the two museums) I gasped. There above the staircase, was the Last Supper - Dali's Last Supper - which is like and unlike Leonardo's.

      Thank you for this!

      Laurie B.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you for sharing that experience, Laurie.

      Dali's Last Supper is wonderful, in the real sense of the word. Do you want to do a hub on that? If you do, I'll link it to this for the benefit of my visitors.

    • tinyteddy profile image

      tinyteddy 9 years ago from INDIA

      hi kenny

      great consistent work.

      is it the fact that you are an atheist that helps you analyse christ on the cross (without blinking your eye lid)?

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      TT, thank you.

      I was an atheist, not now. And I blinked, but can't just stand there blinking, can I? Atleast for the sake of my readers? :)

    • sligobay profile image

      sligobay 9 years ago from east of the equator

      Wonderful hub,thanks.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Sligobay.

    • Create Your Dream profile image

      Mary Gallagher 9 years ago from Folsom

      Went to the Dali Exhibit at the Philadelphia Art Museum a couple years ago with my 10 year old son and my hubbie. It was an amazing experience to see the art of Dali so closely. This hub and your insights as well as the great comments brought the experience back to me in shivers! Thank you! Best, Mary g.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Mary, for feeling that this hub helped you relive the experience.

      Regards to you and your family.

      Kenny

    • Angela Harris profile image

      Angela Harris 9 years ago from Around the USA

      Wow, this is fantastic. Please keep enlightening me. By the way, I gave you a thumbs up for such an excellent hub.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thanks for the visit, thumbs up and calling this hub fantastic, Angela. Delighted that you like it so much, and hope you take a look at my other art hubs.

    • profile image

      K Selvaraj 9 years ago

      Dear Friend thanks for all that. i wish you for all great work its wonderful i dont know how to tell. your analysis is very great. I really enjoyed this insight into Dali, I'll keep an eye out for your other hubs.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you and welcome to my hubs, Friend. Why don't you also write here?

    • donnaleemason profile image

      donnaleemason 9 years ago from North Dakota, USA

      Kenny, I will never look at another picture by Dali in quite the same way. Now I will be looking for shapes and meanings, not just at the picture. Thanks that was fascinating.

      Donna

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 9 years ago from Chennai

      Donna, I am delighted to have made a difference in the way you look at art. No doubt you will share that attitude with people you touch, too! Thank you.

    • Dorsi profile image

      Dorsi Diaz 8 years ago from The San Francisco Bay Area

      Surrealism has always been one of my favorites- in fact some of my artwork, especially in the earlier days- was definitely surreal-There is something so much deeper than meets the eye-there is hidden meaning that sometimes we can pick up- or sometimes only the artist knows what he meant to say and we never know what the true intention was.Dali is one of my favorite artists- and this is a beautiful painting.Great hub!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Hi Dorsi!

      Surrealism allows us to give form to our subconscious visions and touch other minds, too. Whatever Dali wants to say does not matter when we look at his work, possess it and enjoy it with our interpretations.

      Thank you for that insight.

    • ripplemaker profile image

      Michelle Simtoco 8 years ago from Cebu, Philippines

      Kenny, I continue to learn from you as well as reading everybody's comments. Thank you. :)

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      I learnt a lot of things from my visitors, too; I'm truly fortunate.

      Thank you, Michelle! :)

    • Juliet Christie profile image

      Juliet Christie Murray 8 years ago from Sandy Bay Jamaica

      Great pices of explanation of art I feel I have entered and area described too sacred for me to tread. All that I can say is the pieces are inspirational. Your children's books must be beautifully illustrated

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Juliet, thank you for these very kind comments. I do my best when I work for children, so I hope they are as beautiful as you say.

      But art is not too sacred to tread. My main thing in life is to welcome everybody into that area. :)

    • Paraglider profile image

      Dave McClure 8 years ago from Kyle, Scotland

      {{{ But art is not too sacred to tread. My main thing in life is to welcome everybody into that area. :) }}}

      Keep up the great work - you do this so well!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Just like you welcome everybody into art through the door of poetry, O Paraglider!

      Thanks for the comment, I'm honoured.

    • perfumer profile image

      perfumer 8 years ago from California

      Thank you for such a great inspirational hub Kenny!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you for reading it, Perfumer!

    • profile image

      Sheyd 8 years ago

      I would like to thank you for one great information about this painting.

      Actually, we have this group exam and we have to analyze this particular painting. And I have to admit, your hub will really help us.

      Aside from your help for our exam. You did make me realize how wonderful art is. Before reading your hub, I completely had no idea about this painting. But through you, I did understand things. I am also inspired by the hideen meanings in this painting.

      I have to say, I am beginning to lovelooking at paintings differently. And that's because of you.

      Again, thank you so much!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Sheyd, I am honoured! And delighted, of course!

      "I have to say, I am beginning to love looking at paintings differently. And that's because of you." - that is what I wanted to achieve, so thank you for making me feel so great!

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image

      Patty Inglish 8 years ago from North America

      I agree with Sheyd, Kenny. Your work here also helps so many of us that received no art or art appreciation training in schools because of budget cuts (even at college level) resulting from the horrid verbalized attitude that "art is a waste of time."

      Bless you!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 8 years ago from Chennai

      Hi, thanks, Patty! Oh you have changed your avatar after ages! Now you are a cool blue! :)

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Just discovered your writing and since you labeled this as your favorite or best, I started reading this hub first. I love art and create some. Now I know what a treat I have in store for me in reading more of your hubs. You also have a new fan.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you Peggy for making me feel very good. :)

    • MickS profile image

      MickS 7 years ago from March, Cambridgeshire, England

      Watcha Kenny, interesting, senisible and well argued take that I wouldn't argue with.[there is a rule of grammer, it really is a myth, never use a preposition, to end a sentance with] :-) I think there may be other forms of symbolism, one I can think of at the mo is from the Buddha, All life is suffering, don't get what you want and you suffer, get what you want and you suffer, you might lose it; is Mary the embodiment of the world and that form of suffering? Did Jesus give the world what it wanted? Well no, he gave the world what it needed, the people didn't recognize that and they nailed him to a cross, and continued the suffering, right to this day. just a few thoughts off the top of my head:-) best Mick

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you Mick, for your top-of-the-head thoughts, :)

    • frogyfish profile image

      frogyfish 7 years ago from Central United States of America

      Beautiful and informative, very interesting! I especially clung to 'the bouyancy of Absolute Love". Thank you for this wonderful hub!

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Frogy, please cling to the buoyancy of Absolute Love. The more of us there, the lighter teh world will be. :))

      Thank you for making me feel buoyant!

    • agvulpes profile image

      Peter 7 years ago from Australia

      Kenny ,I have been a fan of Dali for ages but have not had the privelage of studying this painting with such detail.

      I had no idea that the on looker was his wife.

      I join everyone else in thanking you for passing on your knowledge :-) and I have become an instant fan.

    • Kenny Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Delighted, Agvulpes! I shall become your instant fan too! :)

    • profile image

      Ryan 7 years ago

      Crucifixion - I notice a couple of things here. First, there are no nails attaching him physically to the cross, which could represent a perfect ascension.

      Dali must have really liked mathematics, it fascinates me that he uses the hypercube here, in this case the three dimensional (unfolded) version of a four dimensional object, representing the fifth dimension, or as you said, a higher plane of existence, that since the development of sting theory in physics (and later M-Theory) is really a hot button for modern day physicists, especially the more philosophical ones.

    • Amez profile image

      Amez 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Thank you Kenny, Its ovious that your heart and soul are in a great place and your Hubs demonstrate your devotion, to the beauty in art. You truly deserve ten Hugs. Ed

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Ryan, for that added value to my hub! :)

      Ed, What you say applies a lot to yourself! Thank you very much for the ten hugs, you deserve double that. :)

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      abby 7 years ago

      Do you know of anywhere I might find more interpretations on the crucifixion by Dali? What I am trying to find is a comparison between realistic and dreamlike elements.

      Thank u

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

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      Shalini Kagal 7 years ago from India

      Wonderful hub, Kenny. Love the lighting and the sense of suspension - thank you for sharing the geometrical angle to the paintings!

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 7 years ago from Chennai

      Oh Shalini, thank you for this great comment! :)

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      anoushka shah 6 years ago

      wow this was really nice, i aspire to study art and reading things like this really open up the mind! thank you :)

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 6 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you Anoushka! Delighted to be of help! :))

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      keith 6 years ago

      maybe the figure isn't christ at all ... maybe it is infact dali - taking into consideration the era it comes from, his other "religious" works during the 1950's - the fact that christs face is never shown (except sacrament of the last supper, where gala's face is merged with christ's) ... i like to believe that if the heads of the "christ" figures were rotated a few degrees, we would infact see a glorious upturned moustache smiling at us :)

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 6 years ago from Chennai

      Maybe Dali thought it sacrilegious to show His face? Thanks anyway, Keith. :)

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      keith 6 years ago

      exactly Kenny ;) lol

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 6 years ago from Chennai

      Thanks for the return Keith! :)

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      Jackie Paulson 6 years ago from USA IL

      Since I am a newbie, and came across your art this is by far amazing work. Since I believe in Christ, this really inspired me and my ways. I truly believe that art speaks in volumes. Be true to myself, is the message it gave me today. May you be blessed as you bless others though your inspirational art and hubs.

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 6 years ago from Chennai

      I am overwhelmed by your comment and blessing, Onceuponatime!

      Art speaks volumes due to many reasons, and one is that a piece of art changes with who is in its presence and his or her personal interpretation.

      Please allow me to wish you the wonderful things you wished me. :)

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      Cam 5 years ago

      I've always seen this as a complex depiction of man's need to deconstruct his ego (achieved symbolically through destruction of the object, the physical as such) before being able to reach God. You can feel the tension between the mini cubes and the body, as if the whole thing is about to split into a million different cubes.

      Here's George Bataille on Art and the Sacrificial Victim

      'It is to this wait that the bait of sacrifice responds. What we have been waiting for all our lives is this disordering of the order that suffocates us. Some object should be destroyed in this disordering (destroyed as an object and, if possible, as something "separate"). We gravitate to the negation of that limit of death, which fascinates like light. For the disordering of the object — the destruction — is only worthwhile insofar as it disorders us, insofar as it disorders the subject at the same time. We cannot ourselves (the subject) directly lift the obstacle that "separates" us. But we can, if we lift the obstacle that separates the object (the victim of the sacrifice), participate in this denial of all separation. What attracts us in the destroyed object (in the very moment of destruction) is its power to call into question — and to undermine — the solidity of the subject. Thus the purpose of the trap is to destroy us as an object (insofar as we remain enclosed — and fooled — in our enigmatic isolation).'

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 5 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Cam! :)

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      Rosetta Ceesay 5 years ago from United Kingdom

      He is a fascinating artist and I have seen some of his works in person, which was awesome. Good article.

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 5 years ago from Chennai

      Lucky you, Rosetta! And thanks! :)

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      Stephanie Bradberry 5 years ago from New Jersey

      I went to a Dali exhibit a few years ago in Philly. It was really cool. There were interesting features like having one of Dali's non painted works on display. It was a model of the Crucifixion where you had to look through something similar to a spy glass. It made a really interesting surreal 3-D effect.

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      Ashok Rajagopalan 5 years ago from Chennai

      Thank you, Stephanie. I hope to look through that spyglass some day. :)

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